Andy Pennell noted a really interesting post from a Mozilla Firefox developer. It looks like people out there are still using Visual C++ 6.0 as the debugger of choice. And, guess what, I also use Visual C++ 6.0 occasionally, but not for debugging (I switched long ago to the geeky, powerful, superfast command-line debugger called NTSD). I use VC6 these days as a tool to generate a COM server whenever I quickly need one.

In my view, Visual C++ 6.0 is still the perfect tool to generate a COM server, especially if you plan to run it on older versions of Windows like XP or Windows 2000 (which already contain the right runtimes in the OS). True, VC6 doesn't have that sexy COM attributed programming, which means that the generated code is sometimes more verbose. But I guess the main reason for not using the newer ATL is that I haven't seen yet an newer edition of ATL Internals...

But on the other side, I am now pretty familiar with ATL 3.0 version of atlbase.h and atlcom.h. If I can generate in 5 minutes a new COM server that does exactly what I want, I guess that's all I need for now :-)

 

P.S. For editing, depending on the project, I use either Source Insight or Visual Studio 2003. Recently I started to switch to Visual Studio 2005, which is pretty interesting...