Computer Science Teacher
Computer Science Teacher - Thoughts and Information from Alfred Thompson

  • Computer Science Teacher - Thoughts and Information from Alfred Thompson

    Just Add Imagination

    • 148 Comments

    I met a 12-year old programmer yesterday. He was on a field trip to the Microsoft Technology Center in Chicago with his middle school. He'd brought a USB storage stick with a program he'd written on it to show us. What he had written was a very cool web browser. He told me it included about 20,000 lines of C# code.

    He demonstrated the program for the group and I have to say he impressed a lot of people. This web browser had the features you would expect such as tabbed browsing but it had a lot of features I'd never thought about. For example it was a simple menu option to have the program look up the ownership of a domain using whois. And there were other options to get other bits of information about the web site as well. Frankly there was too much to see in a short period of time for me to absorb it all. I gave him my card and asked him to email me. Frankly I want to try his program out for myself. I also want to know more about how he did it as well.

    There were a couple of messages I took from this experience. One key message was that young students are very capable of thinking outside the box. They are quite adept at looking at a tool (in this case C# and the .NET Framework) and putting the pieces together in new and interesting ways. Another is that Visual Studio and the objects in the .NET Framework clearly make a lot of things easier to include in a program than ever before. This student was taking full advantage of them and had created a very powerful application.  The combination of opportunity, the right tools and a young, energetic creative mind is a very wonderful and powerful thing.

    I just wish we could introduce programming to more young students. This student is 12 but has already been programming for three years. Bill Gates started programming when he was 13 so this young student has a four year head start. Just imagine the possibilities.

    {Note: I have a brief follow up on this student posted as he enters high school.]

    [Note to Digg readers - please look around and read more of my blog. I'm glad you stopped by.]

  • Computer Science Teacher - Thoughts and Information from Alfred Thompson

    Why are all programming languages in English?

    • 93 Comments

    Last week I was at the CSTA Computer Science & Information Technology conference in New York City. One of the great thing about events like this is the hallway conversations that just happen. When you get a lot of interesting people together the conversations are interesting by default. I had one such conversation with Dave Reed, computer science faculty at Creighton University and past Chief Reader of the Advanced Placement Computer Science exam. We started by talking about programming by people whose language is not English. The keywords they use are, for almost all languages, in English. Comments, variables, user written classes and methods though are in their own language. How confusing might that be? Dave has used a program written in German in some of his classes and asked students to explain what is going on from context. That’s an interesting exercise for sure. On the other hand why not translate the keywords?

    Many years ago I heard Grace Hopper talk about an early compiler. As I recall they wrote this sample compiler and finished it before it was due. They thought about the fact that keywords are really just symbolic so why not make them in other languages. They wound up adding support for several languages into the compiler. Unfortunately the committee who reviewed the final project thought that was far to complicated to actually work and concluded the demo was faked. Ah, the early days on computers when people really didn’t understand what they could do. To this day compilers seem to only understand keywords in one language and that language is almost always English.

    It is not just Americans or even other English as a first language speakers who are doing this. Niklaus Wirth who designed PASCAL among other languages was Swiss. No doubt he could have used any one of several other natural languages but he used English. Off hand I don’t know of programming languages that use non English keywords. If there are some, and there must right, they don’t appear to be common. Anyone know any?

    I’m not sure why this is. Most modern computer design was done in English language countries but that should not be a limitation. The other thing I really don’t understand is why IDEs don’t support non-English keywords. I mean how hard could it be to add a parser that uses different (or additional) keywords? It’s been a long time since my graduate course in compiler design but as I recall parsing was only a small part of the whole process. Converting things to meta data should be a simple matter. Expensive perhaps but not critically so. Anyone know of IDEs that do this sort of thing? And why are people whose first languages not designing their own languages using non-English keywords? I can understand something about wanting widespread acceptance and that most experienced programmers know English keywords if not a real working knowledge of English. On the other hand having kids learn in their native language strikes me as potentially a good thing.

    Just something to wonder about today.



  • Computer Science Teacher - Thoughts and Information from Alfred Thompson

    Visual Studio Learning Opportunities

    • 3 Comments

    I received some information about some new offerings from Microsoft learning last week and thought they would be worth sharing with others. If you are looking to upgrade to Visual Studio 2008 now or in the near future these resources may help you jump start your learning.

    Free Visual Studio 2008 e-book

    If you want a book to get up to speed quickly on Visual Studio 2008 this free e-book may be a good start for you. There are also some special training offers there.

    Find Classroom Training on Visual Studio 2008

    There is a new one day training course being offered at training centers all over the county. This course teaches new development features available in Visual Studio 2008. Read about the course and find local training near you here.

    Visual Studio 2008  Free E-Learning for Visual Studio 2008

    There is a new free online course, "Developing Enhanced Web Experiences with Microsoft ASP.NET AJAX Extensions", for people who want to incorporate ASP.NET and AJAX.

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