Citizen journalism is a growing phenomenon. The ability for us to use our phones to take pictures or shoot video using devices such as our mobile phones, and to instantly share them with the world is really quite something else. The Mars landing recorded live from mission control by US Congressman John Culberson, or the opening of the World Economic Forum or videos taken at SxSW in Austin, are examples of videos that were streamed live from mobile phones.

Qik is one of the leading live mobile video streaming platforms. Qik enables anyone to stream video live from their mobile phones to the web, from anywhere in the world. Today, Qik is announcing support for the Motorola Q and the Samsung Blackjack, Windows Mobile phones.

Qik's usability is what makes the application extremely appealing. Users can stream live video to the Internet in just two clicks from their Windows Mobile phones, and join others as they watch online and engage in live interactive chat. Windows Mobile phones have been gaining in popularity worldwide, and Qik wants to leverage the popularity of the platform.

Qik has gained immense respect with the bloggerati. Michael Arrington from TechCrunch (TechCrunch), Robert Scoble from FastCompany.tv (Scobleizer), Kevin Rose from Digg (Kevin), Daniel Terdiman from CNET (Qik Profile) are just some who have been using Qik to live stream.

I look forward to continuing work with Qik to get the product to a beta form, and to support more Windows Mobile phones moving forward.

The alpha of the Qik runtime for Windows Mobile phones is available in a closed alpha form. Email winmo@qik.com to request an invite (currently restricted to the first 50 requests, others will be added to a waitlist). And, follow me on Qik!

"ai"