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More detailed troubleshooting ideas for .NET Framework 1.0 SP3 and 1.1 SP1 failures

More detailed troubleshooting ideas for .NET Framework 1.0 SP3 and 1.1 SP1 failures

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I have posted a couple of previous items about .NET Framework 1.0 SP3 and 1.1 SP1 installation issues (at http://blogs.msdn.com/astebner/archive/2004/09/20/232236.aspx and http://blogs.msdn.com/astebner/archive/2004/09/21/232653.aspx).  There is a KB article in the works with more information but it appears to not be posted for viewing yet, so I wanted to include the info that it contains here in the hopes that it might help some folks who are stuck installing one of these .NET Framework service packs.

.NET Framework SP Setup Issues

 

Overview

 

This document provides a reference to common setup issues and workarounds for .NET Framework 1.1 Service Pack 1 (SP1) and .NET Framework 1.0 Service Pack 3 (SP3).

 

Windows Update Failures

 

Windows Update Failed – Detailed Error Code “E0434F4D”

 

0xE0434F4D (-532459699) is a generic COM exception.  This is caused by a failure in the managed patch wrapper.  There are 3 recommended steps that may fix this problem.  If these do not work, further investigation will be required.

 

1.                  Repair .NET Framework 1.1 RTM (click Start, click Control Panel, click Add or Remove Programs, click Microsoft .NET Framework 1.1, click “Click here for support information”, click the Readme link).  This page has the 4 steps you will need to run to repair the .NET Framework

2.                  Clear the Windows Update temporary downloads cache.  See http://support.microsoft.com/kb/193385 for more information.

3.                  Clear the temporary directory.  Click Start, click Run, type “%temp%”, click Ok.  An Explorer window will open.  Select all of the files, and hit the delete key.

 

If these steps do not solve the problem then more information must be gathered.  To see a more detailed error, download the service pack from http://download.microsoft.com/ and then double-click the EXE package.  If the issue occurs again, a crash dialog will be displayed this time.

 

Windows Update Failed – Detailed Error Code “643”

 

0x643 = 1603 = ERROR_INSTALL_FAILURE.  This error can be caused by one of the issues listed in the Error Dialogs section below.  The two most likely causes are the netfx.msi resolve source issue or the info 9002 issue.

 

To see a more detailed error, download the service pack from http://download.microsoft.com/ and then double-click the EXE package.  If the issue occurs again, an error dialog will be displayed this time.

 

Windows Update Failed – Detailed Error Code “652”

 

0x652 = 1618 = ERROR_INSTALL_ALREADY_RUNNING.  This error is caused by the item titled Windows Installer Error 1618 – Another installation is already in progress described below.

 

Crash Dialogs

 

TargetInvocationException in SLxxx.tmp – missing registry key

 

TargetInvocationException in SLxxx.tmp can occur for many different reasons.  One of the reasons that this crash occurs is when the Windows Installer registry hive is missing the LocalPackage value for the version of the .NET Framework being serviced. 

 

Use the registry editor (regedit.exe) to navigate to

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Installer\UserData.  Next, search for the string “.NET Framework”

 

When the search completes, several registry name/value pairs will be listed in the right-hand window pane.  If a DisplayName value of “Microsoft .NET Framework” exists but there is not a LocalPackage value then the TargetInvocationException is being caused by this issue.

 

Reinstalling .NET Framework 1.0 or 1.1 will fix this problem. 

 

TargetInvocationException in SLxxx.tmp – missing MSI file

 

Another variation of the TargetInvocationException error is caused by a missing cached MSI file in the %windir%\Installer directory.  This crash occurs when the Windows Installer registry hive contains a LocalPackage value that points to a nonexistent file.

 

See the previous topic (TargetInvocationException in SLxxx.tmp – missing registry key) for details on how to find the LocalPackage registry value.  Once the key is found open a command prompt (click Start, click Run, type cmd) and use the dir command to try to locate the target of the LocalPackage value.  For example, if the LocalPackage key was d:\windows\installer\f493a.msi you would type “dir d:\windows\installer\f493a.msi”.  If the dir shows “file not found” then the TargetInvocationException is being caused by this issue.  Reinstalling the .NET Framework 1.0 or 1.1 will fix this issue. 

 

If the file does exist then the TargetInvocationException is being caused by another issue. 

 

TargetInvocationException in SLxxx.tmp – virus scanner

 

A TargetInvocationException can occur if the service pack setup “cancel” button is pressed while a virus scanner is running.

 

In this scenario, the TargetInvocationException appears right before the success dialog is displayed and does not harm the computer.  This TargetInvocationException can be ignored.

 

TargetInvocationException in SLxxx.tmp – low system resources

 

A TargetInvocationException can occur when the system is out of memory.

 

Rebooting the computer and then re-running the service pack setup can correct this problem.

 

SLxxx.tmp – Configuration Error

 

The error "Configuration Error: Unable to load JIT compiler (MSCORJIT.DLL) File may be missing or corrupt.  Please check your setup or rerun setup!" is a known issue with the setup for both the .NET Framework 1.1 SP1 and .NET Framework 1.0 SP3 releases.  The error is harmless and does not damage the machine.  On heavily loaded machines (machines in which it takes at least 5 seconds for setup to launch), before setup has begun installing, a dialog can be displayed that warns about an issue with any one of the following files:

 

1.                  fusion.dll

2.                  mscorjit.dll

3.                  mscorlib.dll

4.                  mscorsn.dll

5.                  mscorwks.dll

6.                  perfcounter.dll

7.                  corperfmonext.dll

8.                  aspnet_isapi.dll 


The workaround is to reduce the load on the machine by closing applications before re-running setup. 

 

SLxxx.tmp – Unable to Locate DLL

 

This dialog is a variation of the SLxxx.tmp – Configuration Error issue described above.

 

SLxxx.tmp – Common Language Runtime Debugging Services

 

This crash dialog can be displayed for many reasons. A list of known causes and workarounds follows.

 

·         Check the My_Computer_Zone has FullTrust permissions enabled

 

1.       Click Start, Control Panel, and open Administrative Tools.

2.       Select the latest version of the Microsoft .NET Framework Configuration tool.

3.       Drill-down to Runtime Security Policy, Machine, Code Groups, All_Code, My_Computer_Zone.

4.       Right-click on My_Computer_Zone, select the Permission Set tab, and verify/change the permission set to FullTrust.

 

Installation Hangs

 

Service Pack installation hangs while running IIS

 

The service pack installation may hang due to unresponsive IIS services on the machine (specifically WS3SVC and SMTP).  This is because setup attempts to stop some services if they are running on the machine before patching.

 

If the service pack installation repeatedly hangs then the workaround is to manually stop the WS3SVC and SMTP services before running setup using the following steps:

 

1.       Run "%SystemRoot%\system32\services.msc /s" to start the Services Manager

2.       Find World Wide Web Publishing Service (WS3SVC) and Simple Mail Transfer Protocol Service (SMTP) in the services list.

3.       Right-click on each service name and select Stop

 

Alternately, turning off IISADMIN by opening a cmd prompt and running net stop /y iisadmin will also solve this service pack installation hang issue.  Both WS3SVC and SMTP are dependent on IISADMIN, so stopping IISADMIN will also stop WS3SVC and SMTP.

 

After the installation, rebooting the computer or restarting the services by clicking "Start" instead of "Stop" in the Services Manager will return the computer to its original state.

 

Error Dialogs

 

Windows Installer Error 1618 – Another installation is already in progress

 

Another installation is already in progress. Only one Windows Installer setup can run at a time.  You should complete the other installation before proceeding with this install.

 

Windows Installer Dialog – cannot find ‘netfx.msi’

 

Windows Installer may display a dialog asking the user to provide the location of netfx.msi.  This is called a Resolve Source Dialog.  Sometimes patches can prompt for the original installation media (asking the user for the location of netfx.msi).  This can happen when Windows Installer determines that the original product has missing or corrupt files which are not included in the patch package. 

 

Repairing or reinstalling the original product will fix this issue.  Here are the repair instructions for .NET Framework 1.0 and 1.1:

 

To repair the .NET Framework

Obtain the original installation source. For example, if you installed the .NET Framework from CD or DVD, insert the disk. Or, if you downloaded the .NET Framework, download again and choose to save to disk. If you installed from a network share, reconnect.

On the Start menu, choose Run.

For Windows 98 and Windows Me type:

command

For Windows NT, Windows 2000, Windows XP or later, type:

cmd

In the command window, type the following:

n:\<Installation Source>\dotnetfx.exe /t:%temp% /c:"msiexec.exe /fvecms %temp%\netfx.msi"

 

For example:

d:\dotNetFramework\dotnetfx.exe /t:%temp% /c:"msiexec.exe /fvecms %temp%\netfx.msi"

To repair a .NET Framework Language Pack

Obtain the original installation source. For example, if you installed the .NET Framework Language Pack from CD or DVD, insert the disk. Or, if you downloaded the .NET Framework Language Pack, download again and choose to save to disk. If you installed from a network share, reconnect.

On the Start menu, choose Run.

For Windows 98 and Windows Me type:

command

For Windows NT, Windows 2000, Windows XP or later, type:

cmd

In the command window, type the following:

n:\<Installation Source>\langpack.exe /t:%temp% /c:"msiexec.exe /fvecms %temp%\langpack.msi"

 

For example:

d:\dotNetFramework\langpack.exe /t:%temp% /c:"msiexec.exe /fvecms %temp%\langpack.msi"

 

Info 9002: .NET Framework 1.1 Service Pack 1 (SP1) cannot be installed

 

The dialog “Info 9002: .NET Framework 1.1 Service Pack 1 (SP1) cannot be installed because you have one or more hot fixes installed.  Remove them and try again” is displayed when a blocking hot fix is already installed on the computer. 

 

The 2003 October SDK Documentation Update (KB 827821) as well as two other .NET Framework 1.1 SDK patches (KB 841510 and KB 823641) can block the installation of .NET Framework 1.1 SP1.  A workaround for this issue is to remove all of the following registry keys:

 

·         HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Updates\.NETFramework\1.1\M827821

·         HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Updates\.NETFramework\1.1\M8278211028

·         HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Updates\.NETFramework\1.1\M8278212052

·         HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Updates\.NETFramework\1.1\M8278211042

·         HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Updates\.NETFramework\1.1\M8278211036

·         HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Updates\.NETFramework\1.1\M8278211031

·         HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Updates\.NETFramework\1.1\M8278211041

·         HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Updates\.NETFramework\1.1\M841510

·         HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Updates\.NETFramework\1.1\M823641

 

Removing the registry keys can be done by using the registry editor:

 

1.       Click Start -> Run, type “regedit.exe” and click OK

2.       Inside the Registry Editor, navigate the registry structure until you are in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Updates\.NETFramework\1.1

3.       Expand the registry key list by clicking the plus ‘+’ sign next to the ‘1.1’ registry hive

4.       Right-click on ‘M827821’ and select ‘Delete’

5.       Continue right-clicking and selecting ‘Delete’ for M827821028, M827822052, M827821042, M827821036, M827821031, M827821041, M841510 and M823641 if they are present

 

Windows Installer Error 1325 – ‘XXX’ is not a valid short file name

 

Windows Installer Error 1325 occurs when the service pack is deployed with the command line argument SHORTFILENAMES=1.  A transform file (.MST) is needed to update the short filename in the file table of the .NET Framework netfx.msi to fix this issue if it is necessary to use the SHORTFILENAMES parameter to deploy the service pack.

 

Windows Installer Error 1642 – The installer cannot install the upgrade patch

 

 The installer cannot install the upgrade patch because the program being upgraded may be missing or the upgrade patch updates a different version of the program. Verify that the program to be upgraded exists on your computer and that you have the correct upgrade patch.

 

This dialog means that the wrong patch is being run.  This happens when the wrong version of the patch is accidentally downloaded.  For instance, .NET Framework 1.0 English (ENU) is installed but the .NET Framework 1.0 SP3 German (DEU) patch is being double-clicked.

 

Verify that the correct patch is being used.  The patch file name ends with the 3-letter language identifier (for instance –enu or –deu).

 

How to get help

 

Collect installation log data

 

Gather the following log files when none of the above items solves your problem and further investigation is required:

 

1.       %temp%\netfxsl.log

2.       %temp%\netfxupdate.log

3.       %temp%\MSI*.LOG

 

To get to the %temp% directory click Start, click Run, type “%temp%” and click OK.

 

The MSI*.LOG file(s) may not be created by default.  If an MSI*.LOG file does not exist please enable Windows Installer verbose logging and then re-run the installation so that an MSI*.LOG file is created.

 

The following steps can be used to enable Windows Installer verbose logging:

 

1.       Use the registry editor (regedit.exe) to navigate the registry hive HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\Installer.

2.       Right-click in the right window pane, select New

3.       click DWORD Value

4.       Type “Debug” and hit enter

5.       Right-click the new registry value Debug and select Modify

6.       Set the Value Data field to “7”.

7.       Next, Right-click in the right window pane, select New

8.       click String Value

9.       Type “Logging” and hit enter

10.   Right-click the new registry value Logging and select Modify

11.   Set the Value Data field to “voicewarmup!”.

 

Note: After gathering MSI*.LOG, it is recommended that you disable verbose logging by deleting the Debug and Logging values under HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\Installer in your registry.  If these values are left behind, they will cause Windows Installer to create a verbose log for every MSI-based setup that is run on your computer, which can significantly impact the speed of installation.

 

<update date="10/9/2008"> Fixed a broken link to the Windows Update download troubleshooting knowledge base article. </update>

 

  • I would have needed this explanaitions 2 month ago, when my old desktop PC resumed to install. Now on my new PC it worked as expected...
  • I have been facing one of the problems listed above when I try to install .NET SP1 in my Win 2000 Professional system.I have .NET Framework 1.1 installed in my system.

    The error that comes up when I try to install SP1 is the Windows Installer Error 1642 that says the installer cannot install the upgrade patch. This is the exact error message:

    The installer cannot install the upgrade patch because the program being upgraded may be missing or the upgrade patch updates a different version of the program. Verify that the program to be upgraded exists on your computer and that you have the correct upgrade patch.

    The one & the only one remedy listed out says that the above error is coz the wrong patch is being run.Moreover it says that the patch file name ends with a 3-letter language identifier (like "enu", "due") but the patch that I have downloaded doesn't have its name ending with any 3-letter language identifier although the directory named WUTemp in which the patch gets saved does end with "EN" (if I am not mistaken that means "English"); so I guess I am running the appropriate patch atleast with respect to the language. The patch file that gets saved in my hard disk is in the following directory under the D: drive (Win2K is installed in C:\):

    WUTemp\com_microsoft.KB867460_DOT_NET_EN_1_1_SP1

    & its name is NDP1.1sp1-KB867460-X86.exe.

    I even had a look at a few more detailed ideas to troubleshoot this problem but unfortunately those didn't help me out either!

    Please do note that SP1 gets downloaded when I update my system. This I do by opening IE6.0 & navigating to the Windows Update sub-menu from the Tools menu. After scanning my m/c, Windows itself lists SP1 as a critical update that is missing from my system!

    Could you please help me overcome this highly annoying problem which has been bothering me for quite some time now?

    Thanks,

    Regards,

    Arpan
  • Hi Arpan, I will follow up with you with a direct email with some tools that may help us diagnose what is going on with your machine. Thanks!
  • I have XP SP2 and have never installed .NET. I am getting the 643 error, and install fails. I do not have the mscoree.dll or urttemp file on my system, so deleting them is not an option. I have tried installing from Windows Update, and also from a downloaded dotnetfx.exe. Help? musichem at hotmail
  • A couple of updates -

    I followed up with Arpan and it turned out that there was a previous beta version of the .NET Framework 1.1 installed on the machine that had a different product code. This caused the 1.1 SP1 patch to not apply.

    I have sent Michael a mail to try to narrow down his error as well. One note on the error code - 643 is the hex value for the error, which is 1603 in decimal. 1603 represents a generic Windows Installer "installation failed" message which can be caused by any number of possible problems. I'm hoping that looking at the verbose log file will lead us to a custom action failure or something else that will give us a better explanation for the problem and help us figure out a fix.

  • I have a question:

    I had the following errors:
    (1) 1.0 SP3: "internal error 2755. 1601,c:\windows\installer\c79ca.msi"
    (2) 1.1 SP1: An exception "System.Reflection.TargetInvocationException" has occurred in SL57.tmp

    Lets start with number (2) :

    I checked the registry and got :

    Microsoft .NET Framework SDK (English) 1.1 - 1.1.4322 --> C:\WINDOWS\Installer\1ba43f2.msi (exists)
    Microsoft .NET Framework (English) - 1.0.3705 --> C:\WINDOWS\Installer\c79ca.msi (exists)
    Microsoft .NET Framework 1.1 - 1.1.4322 --> c:\WINDOWS\Installer\1f32ce0.msi (does not exist)

    So ... i just reinstall the framework 1.1. and it will work? Doesnt it conflic with the SDK installation?
  • I believe that reinstalling the .NET Framework 1.1 should fix this. It will not conflict with the SDK 1.1. In fact, for the 1.1 release, the .NET Framework 1.1 redist is a separate product and a prerequisite for the .NET Framework SDK 1.1 to work correctly. Please let me know if that does not work for you.

  • On many systems at our company we are experiencing Windows Installer Error 1325 – ‘XXX’ is not a valid short file name

    Not just developers' systems, it seems to be a creeping malaise that is affecting more and more users around the company.

    Thanks for the tips so far, I'm going to turn on verbose logging to see if I can find the cause of the problem.
  • i think i found it (dont know for sure), the c:\windows\installer directory is read only.

    now i have to find out how to set it to non read-only.
  • That is odd for this directory to be marked read-only. Are you logged in as a limited user, or an administrator?

  • admin, still looking, no virus, no spyware, no antivirus lock, but it is now no longer relevant for this thread so i will investigate myself. i will post the final answer fyi.
  • the dir is readonly on my other xp machines too so i assume it is not odd but practice...ah well...maybe i should just fdisk,reformat and reinstall. Maybe this time ill create a vmware image for my vs.net work might be handier.
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