Aaron Stebner's WebLog

Thoughts about setup and deployment issues, WiX, XNA, the .NET Framework and Visual Studio

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Link to MSDN article with information about which .NET Framework versions are in which versions of Windows and Visual Studio

    • 2 Comments

    I have been maintaining a blog post for a while that lists which version(s) of the .NET Framework are included with each version of Windows.  Recently, I found an MSDN article titled .NET Framework Versions and Dependencies that includes this information in addition to some other useful .NET Framework versioning information.  This article includes details about the following topics:

    • Operating system support - what versions of the .NET Framework are included with each version of Windows
    • Features and IDE - what version of the .NET Framework shipped with each version of Visual Studio and some key features included in each version
    • Targeting and running .NET Framework 4, 4.5, and 4.5.1 apps
    • Targeting and running apps for older versions of the .NET Framework

    In addition, the article includes links to several other useful articles related to .NET Framework versioning, including the following:

    If you have questions about .NET Framework versioning, compatibility, and/or OS integration, I encourage you to check out the information in this set of MSDN articles.

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Links to deployment guides for all versions of the .NET Framework

    • 2 Comments

    Recently, I was looking for links to some of the deployment guides for previous versions of the .NET Framework. After digging through search engine results and my blog archives to find them, I decided it would be easier to create one blog post with links to the deployment guides for all versions of the .NET Framework.  Here they are:

    For reference, the deployment guides for developers are targeted at developers creating applications that depend on the .NET Framework and that want to incorporate the .NET Framework into their installation process, and the deployment guides for administrators are targeted at system administrators that manage software installation on corporate networks and who want to plan a deployment of the .NET Framework to networks that they manage.

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Link to information about .NET Framework 2.0 installation error caused by Visual C++ runtime files

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    Recently, I was trying to help someone investigate a .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 installation issue.  Behind the scenes, the .NET Framework 2.0 SP1 was failing to install, and I found the following information in the setup log file:

    01/01/14 11:22:33 DDSet_Status: Executing Command to stop ngen service: c:\WINDOWS\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v2.0.50727\ngen.exe queue scmstop
    01/01/14 11:22:33 DDSet_Status: LANGID: 1033
    01/01/14 11:22:33 DDSet_Warning: CreateProcess failed

    The typical steps that I recommend in this type of scenario did not end up helping and after trying a few other things, I was stumped.  Fortunately, the customer who encountered this issue found the solution in the blog post at http://blogs.msdn.com/b/smondal/archive/2010/07/12/quot-25007-error-occurred-while-initializing-fusion-setup-could-not-load-fusion-with-loadlibraryshim-error-the-handle-is-invalid-quot.aspx.

    The diagnostic step that I missed when I was originally investigating this issue was to look in the System event log.  In this scenario, several error messages from the SideBySide event source showed that there was a problem with some of the Visual C++ runtime files on this computer.  The blog post that the customer found contains a set of commands that you can copy and paste into a script and run to remove Visual C++ runtime files used by .NET Framework 2.0 setup.  Re-running .NET Framework 2.0 setup will then re-install the Visual C++ runtime files that it needs, which will hopefully resolve this type of setup failure.

    Note – the issue described here and in the linked blog post does not apply to versions of Windows that include the .NET Framework 2.0 as a part of the operating system.  As of the time that I’m writing this blog post, Windows Vista, Windows Server 2008, Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1 and Windows Server 2012 all include the .NET Framework 2.0 as a part of the OS.

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    Link to more information about the Windows Installer Cache Verifier Package troubleshooter

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    There is a new general-purpose installation troubleshooting tool called the Windows Installer Cache Verifier Package troubleshooter that has been available on the Microsoft support site for a little while, and I want to post some information about this tool to help make it easier for people to find it.

    The Windows Installer Cache Verifier Package troubleshooter is integrated into the Microsoft Support Diagnostics service.  It can be used to detect if any .msi or .msp files are missing from the Windows Installer cache on a computer (typically located at c:\windows\installer).  If any files are missing, it will identify what products are associated with the missing files.

    Missing files in the Windows Installer cache is a common cause of problems encountered when trying to uninstall, repair or update MSI-based products.  If you run the Windows Installer Cache Verifier Package troubleshooter and it reports problems, there are some recovery options listed in the tool’s knowledge base article.

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Fixing a .NET Framework 4.5.1 detection logic problem on Windows 8.1

    • 25 Comments

    Last week, I posted an updated version of the .NET Framework setup verification tool that supports verifying the .NET Framework 4.5.1. This past weekend, a customer reported a problem where the tool wasn’t correctly detecting that the .NET Framework 4.5.1 is installed on Windows 8.1. The .NET Framework 4.5.1 is installed as a part of the OS on Windows 8.1, and it isn’t possible to uninstall it, so there had to be something wrong with the detection logic in the tool.

    After some investigation, I discovered a problem with the detection logic that is documented in the .NET Framework 4.5.1 Deployment Guide for Developers. The deployment guide says that an application can test whether the .NET Framework 4.5 or later is installed by checking the HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\NET Framework Setup\NDP\v4\Full folder in the registry for a DWORD value named Release. A value of 378758 means that the .NET Framework 4.5.1 is installed. This logic works correctly for the redistributable version of the .NET Framework 4.5.1. However, on Windows 8.1, the Release value is set to 378675 instead, so this logic doesn’t work on Windows 8.1.

    I have updated all of the following tools and samples to correctly detect the .NET Framework 4.5.1 in both the redistributable case and the Windows 8.1 OS install case:

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    .NET Framework setup verification tool and cleanup tool now support .NET Framework 4.5.1

    • 1 Comments

    I have posted updated versions of the .NET Framework setup verification tool and the .NET Framework cleanup tool that support verifying and cleaning up the .NET Framework 4.5.1. You can find more information about how to download and use these tools at the following locations:

    As always, if you run into any issues or have any feedback about the .NET Framework setup verification tool or the .NET Framework cleanup tool, please let me know by posting a comment on one of my blog posts or using my blog contact form.

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Updated sample .NET Framework detection code that works with the .NET Framework 4.5 and 4.5.1

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    Someone recently asked me about the availability of an updated version of my sample .NET Framework detection code that supports the .NET Framework 4.5.  I could’ve sworn I had already updated that sample code to detect the .NET Framework 4.5, but when I looked back in my archive, it turns out I only updated the version of the detection code that gets built into the .NET Framework setup verification tool and the .NET Framework cleanup tool.

    Since today is the official public release date for Windows 8.1, and Windows 8.1 includes the .NET Framework 4.5.1 as a part of the OS, I thought it would be a good day to post updated versions of my sample .NET Framework detection code with support for detecting the .NET Framework 4.5 and the .NET Framework 4.5.1.

    You can find information about the sample .NET Framework detection code and download links in the article at http://blogs.msdn.com/b/astebner/archive/2009/06/16/9763379.aspx.

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    How to work around Windows Phone SDK 8.0 installation failure caused by invalid digital certificate

    • 36 Comments

    UPDATE - A new Windows Phone SDK 8.0 setup package has been published that contains a fix for this issue.  The original workaround is no longer needed.

    Recently, an issue came up that can cause the Windows Phone SDK 8.0 to fail to install on 64-bit versions of Windows 8 or Windows 8.1.  This issue will cause setup to fail and report an error like the following:

    A required certificate is not within its validity period when verifying against the current system clock or the timestamp in the signed file.

    Microsoft has published a knowledge base article with steps you can use to work around this issue.  You can find the knowledge base article at http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2897627.  Here is a quick summary of the steps listed there:

    1. Uninstall the partially installed Windows Phone SDK 8.0 if it currently installed on your computer.
    2. Download and install the updated setup package
      1. Web downloader - http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=35471
      2. ISO - http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=257234

    Here is the previous workaround that was published prior to the updated setup package being published:

    1. Uninstall the partially installed Windows Phone SDK 8.0 if it currently installed on your computer.
    2. Download the .msi and .cab files from the following 4 locations and save them to the same folder on your computer:

      http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=257143
      http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=257144
      http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=257145
      http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=257146

    3. Go to the folder that you saved the files to and run Win8SharedSDKTools.msi file.
    4. After installing Win8SharedSDKTools.msi, re-run Windows Phone SDK 8.0 setup and install like normal.

    <update date="10/11/2013"> Added a step about uninstalling the Windows Phone SDK 8.0 first if there is a partially installed version on the computer from a previous failed install. </update>

    <update date="10/17/2013"> Added information about the new setup package that contains a fix for the invalid digital certificate issue. </update>

     

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Mailbag: Does my application need to install the .NET Framework 4 on Windows 8 or Windows Server 2012?

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    Question:

    I have an application that requires the .NET Framework 4. The application supports running on Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012, which both include the .NET Framework 4.5 as a part of the operating system. Does my application installer still need to install the .NET Framework 4 on these operating systems even though the .NET Framework 4.5 is already installed?

    Answer:

    No. The .NET Framework 4.5 is a full in-place update for the .NET Framework 4. Applications that require the .NET Framework 4 will run correctly if the .NET Framework 4.5 is installed on the computer. In addition, the installer for the .NET Framework 4 will prevent you from attempting to downgrade a computer that already has the .NET Framework 4.5 back to the .NET Framework 4.

    For more detailed information about .NET Framework 4.5 installation scenarios like this, please refer to this MSDN topic.

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Updating the last modified time to prevent Windows Installer from updating an unversioned file

    • 2 Comments

    Someone recently asked me a question about the unversioned file replacement scenarios that I wrote about a while ago in this blog post.  The scenario that they described to me is similar to one that we faced when building the installer for the XNA Game Studio components that ship in the Windows Phone SDK 8.0, so I wanted to provide an overview of our problem and the solution we implemented in case it is useful to anyone else.

    The problem we faced was that version B of our product (the XNA components in the Windows Phone SDK 8.0) upgrades several components that are shared by version A (the XNA Game Studio 4.0 Refresh).  One of the components is an MSBuild .targets file, which is an unversioned file.  Version B ships a version of the .targets file that is backwards compatible with Version A, so we wanted the installer for version B to overwrite the .targets file if a user installs version A and then version B.  However, we did not want the installer for version A to overwrite (and downgrade) the .targets file if a user installs version B and then version A.

    In order to prevent Windows Installer from overwriting this unversioned file, the last modified time had to be different than the creation time (as documented here).  This feels a bit dirty, but we ended up solving this problem by implementing a custom action in version B of our product to call the SetFileTime function to update the last modified time of the .targets file after installing it.  This causes version A of our product to not overwrite the file if a user installs version B and then version A.  The .targets file is in its own Windows Installer component, which is reference counted by Windows Installer so that the .targets file is left behind after uninstalling either version of the product.  Since we designed version B of the .targets file to be backwards compatible, it would continue to work even if a user installs version B, installs version A, and then uninstalls version B (which leaves them with version A of the product installed but version B of the .targets file installed).

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Cannot install .NET Framework 1.0 service packs if .NET Framework 4 or 4.5 is installed

    • 8 Comments

    There are some known compatibility issues between .NET Framework 4 and 4.5 setup and .NET Framework 1.0 setup.  As a result, installing the .NET Framework 4 or 4.5 will set a registry key that prevents .NET Framework 1.0 setup from running afterwards.  That means that if you need to install both the .NET Framework 1.0 and 4 or 4.5 on the same computer, you need to install the .NET Framework 1.0 first, then install the .NET Framework 4 or 4.5.

    I ran into a similar issue recently that I want to highlight as well because I didn’t find any official documentation about this behavior.  The registry key set by .NET Framework 4 and 4.5 setup will also prevent .NET Framework 1.0 service packs from running afterwards, even if you already have the .NET Framework 1.0 installed.  That means that if you need to install any .NET Framework 1.0 service packs and you have the .NET Framework 4 or 4.5 installed, you will need to do the following:

    1. Uninstall the .NET Framework 4 or 4.5
    2. Install the .NET Framework 1.0 service pack
    3. Re-install the .NET Framework 4 or 4.5

    Behind the scenes, .NET Framework 1.0 setup includes a block that is implemented as a Type 19 custom action.  This custom action is sequenced so that it runs during initial install and repair.  Installing a service pack does the equivalent of a repair, which is why the block is triggered during service pack installation too.

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    System Update Readiness Tool is included as a part of Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012

    • 5 Comments

    Recently, while investigating an issue related to a .NET Framework hotfix installation problem, I reviewed the contents of the System Update Readiness Tool knowledge base article.  I noticed that the contents have been updated since the release of Windows 8.  Instead of needing to download and run a separate tool, the diagnostic and repair functionality in the System Update Readiness Tool is now built into Windows in Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012.  This change should make it much easier to investigate and fix issues on Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012 such as the one I described a while ago in this blog post.

    You can find more detailed information about how to use System Update Readiness Tool functionality in Windows 8 and Windows Server 2012 in this blog post from the Windows servicing team.

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    More information about the versions of the .NET Framework that ship with Windows 8

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    Since the release of Windows 8 last fall, I’ve gotten a few questions about what versions of the .NET Framework ship with Windows 8 and how to install, uninstall and repair them.  Most of this information is documented in other places, but I wanted to put together a brief summary and post some links to hopefully make this information easier to find.

    Windows 8 and the .NET Framework 4.5

    Windows 8 includes the .NET Framework 4.5 as a part of the OS.  It is installed by default and it is not possible to remove it.

    The .NET Framework 4.5 is an in-place upgrade for the .NET Framework 4, and applications built for the .NET Framework 4 will run if the .NET Framework 4.5 is present.  As a result, there is no need to install the .NET Framework 4 or 4.5 redistributable packages on Windows 8.  If you attempt to run the .NET Framework 4 or 4.5 redistributable installers on Windows 8, they will prevent you from installing the redistributable versions.  See this knowledge base article for more information about this scenario.

    Windows 8 and the .NET Framework 2.0, 3.0 and 3.5

    Windows 8 includes the .NET Framework 2.0, 3.0 and 3.5 as a part of the OS.  They are not installed by default, and it is possible to add or remove it by using the Windows Features control panel.  There is also an install-on-demand feature in Windows 8 that will prompt you to install the .NET Framework 2.0, 3.0 and 3.5 if you run an application that requires it.

    If you attempt to run the .NET Framework 2.0, 3.0 or 3.5 redistributable installers on Windows 8, they will prevent you from installing the redistributable versions.

    Here are links with more information about how to install the .NET Framework 2.0, 3.0 and 3.5 on Windows 8:

    If you have an application that depends on the .NET Framework 2.0, 3.0 or 3.5, here are links with more information about options for automating the installation on Windows 8:

    <update date="2/8/2013"> Added a link to a knowledge base article with more information about scenarios where installing the .NET Framework 4 or 4.5 redistributable package is blocked by Windows 8. </update>

     

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Windows Phone SDK update for Windows Phone 7.8 is now available for download

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    As announced earlier today on the Windows Phone Developer Blog, the Windows Phone SDK update for Windows Phone 7.8 has been released. The Windows Phone SDK update for Windows Phone 7.8 is a patch and not a standalone product, so you must install the Windows Phone SDK 7.1 or the Windows Phone SDK 8.0 before you can install this update. Here is some information to help you get started installing and using the Windows Phone SDK update for Windows Phone 7.8:

    What’s new in the Window Phone SDK update for Windows Phone 7.8:

    • Windows Phone 7.8 emulator image.
    • Windows Phone 7.8 256MB emulator image.
    • Bundled install of the features included in the Windows Phone SDK 7.1.1 Update if you have the Windows Phone SDK 7.1 installed.

    Download and getting started links for the Windows Phone SDK update for Windows Phone 7.8:

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    Link with more information about developing Xbox LIVE-enabled games for Xbox, Windows, Web, and Windows Phone

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    Every once in a while, I see an email or a post on the forums from a developer who has created a game and wants to explore options for publishing it as an Xbox LIVE Arcade game or an Xbox LIVE-enabled game for Windows Phone, or Windows.  There is a forum FAQ that we have been maintaining that contains some getting started links that will hopefully help developers who are interesting in learning more about this process.  You can find the FAQ item at http://xboxforums.create.msdn.com/forums/t/3290.aspx.

    In that FAQ, there are several links with more information about the Xbox LIVE Arcade program, the game submission process, and developing and submitting game pitches.  Here are a few of the most useful getting started links:

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Uninstalling the Windows Phone SDK 8.0 will break XNA Game Studio 4.0 and vice versa

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    The XNA Game Studio components that are installed as a part of the Windows Phone SDK 8.0 have a setup bug that causes the uninstall process for the Windows Phone SDK 8.0 to break XNA Game Studio 4.0 and vice versa.

    How to fix XNA Game Studio 4.0 if you uninstall the Windows Phone SDK 8.0

    If you have both the Windows Phone SDK 8.0 and XNA Game Studio 4.0 installed and then uninstall the Windows Phone SDK 8.0, you will need to do the following to restore XNA Game Studio 4.0 functionality:

    1. Go to the Programs and Features control panel and uninstall the item named Microsoft XNA Framework Redistributable 4.0 Refresh.
    2. Go to the Programs and Features control panel and repair the item named Microsoft XNA Game Studio 4.0 Refresh.

    How to fix the Windows Phone SDK 8.0 if you uninstall XNA Game Studio 4.0

    If you have both the Windows Phone SDK 8.0 and XNA Game Studio 4.0 installed and then uninstall the XNA Framework Redistributable 4.0 component that is installed as a part of XNA Game Studio 4.0, you will need to repair the Windows Phone SDK 8.0 to restore XNA Game Studio functionality in the Windows Phone SDK 8.0.

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    XNA Windows Phone project templates are not available if Visual Studio 2012 is installed to a non-default path

    • 1 Comments

    The XNA Game Studio component that ships with the Windows Phone SDK 8.0 has a setup bug that causes some of the project templates to be installed to an incorrect location if Visual Studio 2012 or the Windows Phone SDK 8.0 is installed to a non-default path.  If you run into this issue, you can use the following steps to restore the missing project templates.

    If you are using Visual Studio 2012 Professional, Premium or Ultimate:

    1. Copy the following files from C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 11.0\Common7\IDE\Extensions\Microsoft\XNA Game Studio 4.0\ProjectTemplates\CSharp\XNA Game Studio 4.0 to <Visual Studio non-default install path>\Common7\IDE\Extensions\Microsoft\XNA Game Studio 4.0\ProjectTemplates\CSharp\XNA Game Studio 4.0:

      CSXnaWindowsPhoneGame-v4.0.zip
      CSXnaWindowsPhoneLibrary-v4.0.zip

    2. Copy the following files from C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 11.0\Common7\IDE\Extensions\Microsoft\XNA Game Studio 4.0\ProjectTemplates\VisualBasic\XNA Game Studio 4.0 to <Visual Studio non-default install path>\Common7\IDE\Extensions\Microsoft\XNA Game Studio 4.0\ProjectTemplates\VisualBasic\XNA Game Studio 4.0:

      VBXnaWindowsPhoneGame-v4.0.zip
      VBXnaWindowsPhoneLibrary-v4.0.zip

    3. From an elevated cmd prompt, run <Visual Studio install path>\Common7\IDE\devenv.exe /setup

    If you are using Visual Studio 2012 Express for Windows Phone:

    1. Copy the following files from C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 11.0\Common7\IDE\VPDExpressExtensions\Microsoft\XNA Game Studio 4.0\ProjectTemplates\CSharp\XNA Game Studio 4.0 to <Visual Studio non-default install path>\Common7\IDE\VPDExpressExtensions\Microsoft\XNA Game Studio 4.0\ProjectTemplates\CSharp\XNA Game Studio 4.0:

      CSXnaWindowsPhoneGame-v4.0.zip
      CSXnaWindowsPhoneLibrary-v4.0.zip

    2. Copy the following files from C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 11.0\Common7\IDE\VPDExpressExtensions\Microsoft\XNA Game Studio 4.0\ProjectTemplates\VisualBasic\XNA Game Studio 4.0 to <Visual Studio non-default install path>\Common7\IDE\VPDExpressExtensions\Microsoft\XNA Game Studio 4.0\ProjectTemplates\VisualBasic\XNA Game Studio 4.0:

      VBXnaWindowsPhoneGame-v4.0.zip
      VBXnaWindowsPhoneLibrary-v4.0.zip

    3. From an elevated cmd prompt, run <Visual Studio install path>\Common7\IDE\vpdexpress.exe /setup
  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    XNA Windows Phone projects must be upgraded from 7.0 to 7.1 to use with the Windows Phone SDK 8.0

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    The Windows Phone SDK 8.0 supports XNA Windows Phone game projects that target Windows Phone OS 7.1.  It does not support XNA Windows Phone game projects that target Windows Phone OS 7.0.  However, it does not block you from trying to open XNA projects that target Windows Phone OS 7.0.  Instead, it will allow you to open the projects and try to build them, and then you will see error messages about missing reference assemblies.

    In order to open and use your XNA projects that target Windows Phone OS 7.0 in the Windows Phone SDK 8.0, you must first upgrade them to target Windows Phone OS 7.1.  You can perform this upgrade in one of the following ways:

    1. If you do not have the Windows Phone SDK 7.1 installed, you can open your game project (*.csproj or *.vbproj) in a text editor such as Notepad and hand-edit it to upgrade it.  You will need to set the following property:

      <XnaRefreshLevel>1</XnaRefreshLevel>

      If your project file does not yet have the XnaRefreshLevel property, you will need to add it to the PropertyGroup at the top of the project file and set it to 1.  If your project file already has the XnaRefreshLevel property and it is set to 0, you will need to change it to 1.

    2. If you have the Windows Phone SDK 7.1 installed, you can open your 7.0 project with the Windows Phone SDK 7.1 and upgrade it by using the menu item in the Visual Studio 2010 IDE.  There are more detailed instructions in this documentation topic.
  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Windows Phone SDK 8.0 now available for download

    • 6 Comments

    As announced earlier today on the Windows Phone Developer Blog and the Visual Studio Blog, the Windows Phone SDK 8.0 is now available for download. Here is some information to help you get started installing and using the Windows Phone SDK 8.0.

    Download links

    The Windows Phone SDK 8.0 is available in the same set of languages as the Windows Phone SDK 7.1 – Chinese (Simplified), Chinese (Traditional), English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Russian and Spanish.

    Documentation and getting started links

    Installing the Windows Phone SDK 8.0

    The Windows Phone SDK 8.0 must be installed on a Windows 8 x64 computer, and the computer must have a processor that supports Second Level Address Translation (SLAT) in order to fully function. You can use the tool at https://slatstatuscheck.codeplex.com/ to determine if your processor supports SLAT. If you install on a computer with a processor that does not support SLAT, then Windows Phone SDK 8.0 setup will complete, but the Windows Phone 8 emulator will not function correctly.

    Unlike in previous releases, Windows Phone SDK 8.0 setup will not block attempts to install on Windows Server 2012. However, the Windows Phone 8 emulator will not function correctly on Windows Server 2012.

    If you run into an installation or uninstallation failure for the Windows Phone SDK 8.0, you can use the log collection tool to gather your setup log files. This log collection tool will create a file named %temp%\vslogs.cab. Once you have gathered your setup log files, you can upload them to a file server of your choice (such as http://skydrive.live.com), and post a link to the log files in the forums to get additional support.

    Notes about XNA Game Studio

    The Windows Phone SDK 8.0 includes a subset of the XNA Game Studio 4.0 Refresh product. Specifically, it only allows you to develop Windows Phone games that use the XNA Framework. You can see more information about what XNA Framework functionality is supported in the Windows Phone SDK 8.0 in this documentation topic.

    If you are developing Windows games or Xbox 360 games that use the XNA Framework, you must continue to use an edition of Visual Studio 2010 and one of the following products:

    Both of the above products can be installed side-by-side with the Windows Phone SDK 8.0.

    <update date="10/31/2012"> Fixed documentation links to point to MSDN instead of redirecting through the Windows Phone Dev Center. </update>

     

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    Links to .NET Framework 4.5 deployment guides

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    The official .NET Framework 4.5 deployment guides for developers and administrators are available on MSDN, and I wanted to provide links here to help raise visibility for them. Here they are along with some additional information about what is contained in each of them:

    Microsoft .NET Framework 4.5 deployment guide for developers

    You can find the deployment guide for application developers at the following location:

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee942965(v=vs.110).aspx

    The deployment guide for application developers is targeted at developers creating applications that depend on the .NET Framework 4.5 and that will need to incorporate the .NET Framework 4.5 into their installation process. It contains the following information:

    • Deployment options
    • Redistributable packages
    • Deployment methods
    • Setting a dependency on the .NET Framework
    • Installing the .NET Framework manually
    • Chaining the .NET Framework using the default .NET Framework setup UI
    • Chaining using custom UI
    • Detecting the .NET Framework
    • Detecting .NET Framework language packs
    • Chaining language packs to your application setup
    • Troubleshooting – download and installation error codes
    • Uninstalling the .NET Framework
    • Command-line options for .NET Framework setup
    • Supported languages

    Microsoft .NET Framework 4.5 deployment guide for administrators

    You can find the administrator deployment guide at the following location:

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee390831(v=vs.110).aspx

    The administrator deployment guide is targeted at system administrators who want to deploy the .NET Framework 4.5 across a network by using System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM). It contains the following information:

    • Prerequisites
    • Command-line options
    • The deployment process
    • Deploying the .NET Framework in a test environment
    • Creating a collection
    • Preparing the package source directory
    • Creating a package for the .NET Framework redistributable package
    • Creating a program with setup parameters
    • Selecting a distribution point
    • Creating an advertisement
    • Troubleshooting – log files and error codes
  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    .NET Framework Repair Tool now supports diagnosing and repairing .NET Framework 2.0, 3.0 and 3.5 setup issues

    • 18 Comments

    A little while ago, I posted an introduction to a new .NET Framework Repair Tool that can be used to diagnose and repair .NET Framework 4 setup issues.  An updated version of the repair tool has been released today to add support for diagnosing and repairing issues with .NET Framework 2.0 SP2, 3.0 SP2 and 3.5 SP1 setup.  The repair tool can identify and fix issues with the installation of MSI-based versions of the .NET Framework, but it cannot fix issues related to versions of the .NET Framework that are installed as a part of Windows.

    If you run into installation issues with the MSI-based versions of the .NET Framework 2.0 SP2, 3.0 SP2, 3.5 SP1 or 4, I strongly encourage you to download the .NET Framework Repair Tool and run it to see if it resolves your issue before resorting to trying the .NET Framework cleanup tool. Here are links that you can use to find additional information about the .NET Framework Repair Tool:

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    The XNA Framework can be used to create games that run on the Windows 8 desktop

    • 13 Comments

    With the release of Windows 8 and the new development platform for Windows Store applications, there has been some confusion about the level of support for games on Windows 8 that use the XNA Framework and that are built with XNA Game Studio.  I wanted to post something here to help clarify what is and isn’t supported:

    • You cannot use the XNA Framework in Windows Store applications for Windows 8.
    • You can use the XNA Framework in games that run on the Windows 8 desktop.

    The process for creating and deploying XNA Framework-based games for the Windows 8 desktop is no different than the process for creating and deploying games for earlier versions of Windows.  In fact, the deployment process is simpler because Windows 8 includes the .NET Framework 4.5 as an OS component, so you do not need to worry about installing the .NET Framework before you install the XNA Framework 4.0 Redistributable on Windows 8.  If you are creating XNA Framework-based games for the Windows 8 desktop, you can use the information in this forum post to create an installer for your game.

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Updated .NET Framework setup verification tool that addresses application compatibility issues

    • 5 Comments

    A little while ago, I posted an updated version of the .NET Framework setup verification tool that enabled support for the .NET Framework 4.5 and Windows 8.  I used the Windows 8 Release Preview to test that version of the tool, and an application compatibility shim was added to the final version of Windows 8 that causes the .NET Framework setup verification tool to silently exit and return success.  This was done to address application compatibility issues such as this.

    This week, I’ve posted an updated version of the .NET Framework setup verification tool that has a couple of key changes to react to the application compatibility issues that led to this shim being added to Windows 8.  Here is a brief summary of the changes:

    Updated pass/fail logic

    The logic for determining success and failure for .NET Framework setup verification has been updated.  Previously, the tool would report errors if any file that was supposed to be installed by a given version of the .NET Framework was not found on the computer.  Now, missing files are logged as warnings instead of errors because many of the files installed by the .NET Framework are not critical to the functionality of the .NET Framework.  The only things that will cause the verification tool to report an error are the following:

    • Missing registry keys that are used by applications to detect whether or not the .NET Framework is installed (as documented in the deployment guide for each version of the .NET Framework).
    • Failure to run a sample application that verifies that the .NET Framework runtime can be started correctly.

    Silent mode has been removed

    The .NET Framework setup verification tool no longer supports running in silent mode.  While it was never officially supported to do so, some applications have redistributed older versions of the .NET Framework setup verification tool in their installers.  They would run the verification tool in silent mode, and in some cases they would prevent the user from installing their application if the verification tool reported any failures.  This has caused application compatibility issues (such as this) as new versions of Windows and the .NET Framework have been released.

    You can download the latest version of the .NET Framework setup verification tool by using the links in the User’s Guide.  As always, if you run into any issues or have any feedback about the .NET Framework setup verification tool, please let me know by posting a comment on one of my blog posts or by using the contact form.

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Link to new .NET Framework Repair Tool that can diagnose and repair .NET Framework 4 setup issues

    • 8 Comments

    There was a .NET Framework Repair Tool posted on the Microsoft Download Center earlier this summer, and I wanted to post a link here to hopefully make it easier for people to find. 

    I have seen this new tool successfully identify and fix .NET Framework 4 installation issues that have previously required using more invasive means to solve.  Unlike the .NET Framework cleanup tool available via my blog, this new tool performs targeted diagnostics and makes fixes for specific setup issues instead of resorting to forcibly removing the .NET Framework and requiring the user to re-install it.

    If you run into a .NET Framework 4 installation issue, I strongly encourage you to download the .NET Framework Repair Tool and run it to see if it resolves your issue before resorting to trying the .NET Framework cleanup tool.  Here are links that you can use to find additional information about the .NET Framework Repair Tool:

    <update date="9/8/2012"> Added a link to the knowledge base article for the .NET Framework Repair Tool. </update>

     

     

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Final versions of Windows 8, .NET Framework 4.5 and Visual Studio 2012 now available for download

    • 13 Comments

    As announced on the Windows 8 app developer blog, Somasegar’s blog and Jason Zander’s blog, the final versions of Windows 8, the .NET Framework 4.5 and Visual Studio 2012 are now available for developers to download. Here is some information to help you get started installing and using these releases.

    Download links

    Here are links to help you get started downloading Windows 8:

    Here are links to help you get started downloading the .NET Framework 4.5 and Visual Studio 2012:

    Documentation links

    Here are links to help you get started using Windows 8:

    Here are links to help you get started using the .NET Framework 4.5 and Visual Studio 2012:

    Important note about installing Visual Studio 2012 on Windows 8

    The .NET Framework 4.5 is included as a part of Windows 8, and Visual Studio 2012 requires the .NET Framework 4.5 as a prerequisite.  You can only install the final version of Visual Studio 2012 on the final version of Windows 8 because the final version of Windows 8 is the only one that includes the final version of the .NET Framework 4.5.  This means you cannot install pre-release versions of Visual Studio 2012 on the final version of Windows 8, and you also cannot install the final version of Visual Studio 2012 on pre-release versions of Windows 8.

    Notes about XNA Game Studio and Windows Phone development

    If you plan to develop games and applications using XNA Game Studio and/or the Windows Phone SDK, there are a couple of important notes to keep in mind:

    1. XNA Game Studio and the Windows Phone SDK 7.1 both work with Visual Studio 2010, not Visual Studio 2012. You will not see any XNA Game Studio or Windows Phone project templates or other functionality for these products in Visual Studio 2012 if you install both products on the same computer. You can safely install Visual Studio 2010 and Visual Studio 2012 side-by-side on the same computer though.
    2. If you try to install XNA Game Studio or the Windows Phone SDK 7.1 on Windows 8, setup may fail. If it does, you can use the workaround at http://blogs.msdn.com/b/astebner/archive/2012/02/29/10274694.aspx to solve the setup failure.
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