Aaron Stebner's WebLog

Thoughts about setup and deployment issues, WiX, XNA, the .NET Framework and Visual Studio

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    What XNA Game Studio 4.0 functionality works in what version of Visual Studio and on what version of Windows

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    Since XNA Game Studio 4.0 and the Windows Phone Developer Tools shipped a couple of weeks ago, I’ve run into some common questions about the supported OS and Visual Studio matrix, so I decided to try to create a couple of tables to better illustrate what XNA Game Studio 4.0 functionality you can use where and provide a little more detail about the install scenarios.

    XNA Game Studio 4.0 – how to install

    You can download and install XNA Game Studio 4.0 two different ways:

    1.  As an integrated part of the Windows Phone Developer Tools

    • This installer works on Windows Vista and Windows 7
    • It includes an edition of Visual Studio
    • It provides the ability to develop games for Windows, Xbox 360 and Windows Phone

    2.  As a standalone XNA Game Studio 4.0 package

    • This installer works on Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7
    • It does not include an edition of Visual Studio – you must install Visual Studio 2010 yourself before being allowed to install the standalone package
    • It provides the ability to develop games for Windows and Xbox 360

    The following tables provide different views into what functionality is supported where.

    XNA Game Studio 4.0 – Supported Visual Studio editions

    The following table shows what type of games you can develop with XNA Game Studio 4.0 in what editions of Visual Studio 2010.

      Windows games Xbox 360 games Windows Phone games
    Visual Studio 2010 Pro/Premium/Ultimate (devenv.exe) Yes Yes Yes*
    Visual C# 2010 Express (vcsexpress.exe) Yes Yes No
    Visual Studio 2010 Express for Windows Phone (vpdexpress.exe) Yes* Yes* Yes*

    In the table above, Yes* means that the scenario is supported, but only if you install the Windows Phone Developer Tools.  It is not supported if you only install the standalone XNA Game Studio 4.0 product.

    XNA Game Studio 4.0 – Supported operating systems

    The following table shows what type of games you can develop with XNA Game Studio 4.0 on what versions of Windows.

      Windows games Xbox 360 games Windows Phone games
    Windows XP Yes Yes No
    Windows Vista Yes Yes Yes*
    Windows 7 Yes Yes Yes*

    In the table above, Yes* means that the scenario is supported, but only if you install the Windows Phone Developer Tools.  It is not supported if you only install the standalone XNA Game Studio 4.0 product.

    Windows Phone Developer Tools and Visual Studio editions

    Windows Phone Developer Tools setup will always install Visual Studio 2010 Express for Windows Phone (vpdexpress.exe), even if you already have another edition of Visual Studio 2010 installed.  If you have Visual Studio 2010 Professional, Premium or Ultimate installed, WPDT setup will add Windows Phone development features to those editions of Visual Studio 2010 as well.

    WPDT setup has somewhat confusing logic about what shortcuts it creates for Visual Studio 2010 editions.  If it detects that you to not have Visual Studio 2010 Professional, Premium or Ultimate installed, it will create a shortcut to Visual Studio 2010 Express for Windows Phone (vpdexpress.exe).  If it detects that you do have Visual Studio 2010 Professional, Premium or Ultimate installed, it will not create a shortcut to Visual Studio 2010 Express for Windows Phone (vpdexpress.exe), but it is still installed behind the scenes in case you want to use it.  Regardless of what start menu shortcuts appear after installation, you can launch the supported Visual Studio 2010 editions for XNA Game Studio 4.0 development directly from the following locations (these locations assume that you have installed Visual Studio 2010 to the default location):

    • %ProgramFiles%\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\Common7\IDE\devenv.exe
    • %ProgramFiles%\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\Common7\IDE\vcsexpress.exe
    • %ProgramFiles%\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\Common7\IDE\vpdexpress.exe

    Note – in the paths above, you should substitute %ProgramFiles(x86)% for %ProgramFiles% if you are running a 64-bit version of Windows.

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Configuring and testing icon images in XNA Game Studio 4.0 Windows Phone games

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    Michael Klucher wrote a blog post earlier this week that included some information about Windows Phone icon sizes for games and applications.  I wanted to provide a little more information about where each icon image is used and also give some suggestions for how to test your game icons in the emulator.  Here is a summary of what this blog post covers:

    • Windows Phone 7 icon types
    • Windows Phone 7 icon sizes
    • Configuring your project as an application or a game
    • Deployment details for games
    • Deployment details for applications
    • Updating icons in an XNA Game Studio 4.0 Windows Phone game project
    • How to test a game’s application icon in the emulator

    Windows Phone 7 icon types

    The Windows Phone Developer Tools allows you to configure 2 different types of application icons:

    1. The application icon – this is the icon used in the location that your application is deployed to on the phone OS (Games Hub for games, the Application List for applications)

      In a Silverlight for Windows Phone project, this is named ApplicationIcon.png by default.  In an XNA Game Studio 4.0 Windows Phone project, this is named GameThumbnail.png by default. 
       
    2. The pinned icon – this is the icon used in the Windows Phone 7 start menu if you click and hold on your application icon in Games Hub or the Application List and choose “pin to start”

      In both Silverlight for Windows Phone projects and XNA Game Studio 4.0 Windows Phone projects, this is named Background.png by default.

    Windows Phone 7 icon sizes

    The Windows Phone 7 OS displays application icons in 2 different sizes, depending on where they appear:

    1. 62x62 – this is the size used in the Application List (the list that appears when you click the right arrow on the top right side of the Windows Phone 7 start menu).
    2. 173x173 – this is the size used in the Games Hub and in the start menu

    Configuring your project as an application or a game

    The location that your application appears in the Windows Phone 7 OS depends on whether you have configured it to be an application or a game.  During development, this setting is controlled by the Genre value in the file \Properties\WMAppManifest.xml.  When you get ready to submit your application or game to the Windows Phone Marketplace, you will be asked in a web form whether it is an application or a game.  The ingestion process will take the value that you select there and overwrite whatever you list in the file \Properties\WMAppManifest.xml in the project you submit.

    The technology used to create the application or game does not matter.  In other words, although the default experience is to create games with XNA Game Studio and applications with Silverlight, you can also create applications with XNA Game Studio and games with Silverlight if you want to.

    Deployment details for games

    1. To configure your application as a game, set the Genre value in \Properties\WMAppManifest.xml to “Apps.Games”. 
    2. Games will deploy to the Games Hub in the Windows Phone 7 OS
    3. Games should use 173x173 icons for both the application icon and the pinned icon (ideally, the same icon)

    Deployment details for applications

    1. To configure your application as an application, set the Genre value in \Properties\WMAppManifest.xml to “Apps.Normal”.
    2. Applications will deploy to the Application List in the Windows Phone 7 OS
    3. Applications should use a 62x62 icon for the application icon and a 173x173 icon for the pinned icon

    Updating icons in an XNA Game Studio 4.0 Windows Phone game project

    The default project templates for both Silverlight for Windows Phone and XNA Game Studio 4.0 Windows Phone projects in the Windows Phone Developer Tools use the settings for applications, not games.  When you are ready to configure your XNA Game Studio 4.0 project as a game and update the icons, there are a couple of options.  What I typically do is the following:

    1. Right-click on the XNA Game Studio 4.0 Windows Phone game project in the Visual Studio solution explorer and choose Properties
    2. Click on the XNA Game Studio property page
    3. Change the Game thumbnail drop-down to use Background.png instead of GameThumbnail.png
    4. Create a 173x173 .png file for your game and overwrite the default Background.png in your project
    5. Set the Genre value in \Properties\WMAppManifest.xml to “Apps.Games”

    Alternatively, you can create a 173x173 .png file and overwrite the default GameThumbnail.png in your project.  However, if you do that, you also have to remember to overwrite Background.png in your project as well.  For a Windows Phone game, there isn’t any real reason to need 2 different icons because Games Hub and the start menu both use the same icon size.

    How to test a game’s application icon in the emulator

    The Windows Phone emulator does not have the Games Hub in it, so you cannot directly test how your application icon will look when it is displayed in Games Hub.  However, the icon size in Games Hub matches the icon size when an application is pinned to the start menu.  That means that you can use steps like the following to test the appearance of your game’s application icon in the emulator:

    1. Set the Genre value in \Properties\WMAppManifest.xml to “Apps.Normal” – this is the default value for new projects but if you have changed it for some reason, you’ll need to change it back
    2. Deploy your game to the emulator using Visual Studio, XnaPack or the Application Deployment tool
    3. Click the back button in the emulator to exit your game
    4. Click the right arrow in the emulator start menu to go to the Application List
    5. Click and hold on your game icon in the Application List, then choose pin to start
    6. Click the back button or the Windows button in the emulator to return to the start menu, and look at the appearance of your game icon in the start menu

    Additional information

    There are a few follow-up questions that folks usually ask when I explain the above information to them:

    1. Why do XNA Game Studio 4.0 Windows Phone game projects include default settings for applications instead of default settings for games?  The primary reason we decided to use these settings for XNA Game Studio 4.0 projects is that the Games Hub is not available in the Windows Phone emulator, and some testing scenarios are not possible in the emulator unless you use the application configuration settings.
    2. Why are there 2 different icon sizes for phone applications?  The Application List displays smaller icons than the start menu, and scaling a 62x62 image up to 173x173 can cause the images to look grainy/blurry, so developers can provide 2 different resolutions for their icons that will look good in both scenarios.
    3. Why doesn’t the XNA Game Studio 4.0 Windows Phone project template just include a 173x173 version of GameThumbnail.png?  We explored this prior to shipping, but it ended up causing problems for cross-platform game development scenarios.  The maximum size of a game thumbnail in an Xbox 360 game is 16 KB, and a 173x173 version of the default GameThumbnail.png went over that size limit.  We wanted to preserve the ability to right-click on a Windows Phone game project and create a working copy for the Xbox 360.
    4. I also see a file named Game.ico in an XNA Game Studio 4.0 Windows Phone project.  What is that used for?  This is used as an icon for the .exe if you build a Windows copy of your game.  It is included in Windows Phone and Xbox 360 projects so you can right-click and create a copy of the project for Windows.
  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Steps to upgrade an XACT project so it can be used with XNA Game Studio 4.0

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    If you have an XNA Game Studio 3.1 project that includes an XACT audio project and plan to upgrade it to XNA Game Studio 4.0, there is an additional manual step you must take to upgrade your XACT project to the newer XACT file format required by XNA Game Studio 4.0.

    We updated the XACT tools used by XNA Game Studio 4.0 at the last-minute due to an issue that we discovered shortly before shipping.  Unfortunately, we did not have time to add information about how to upgrade XACT projects to the XNA Game Studio 4.0 upgrade documentation.  Hopefully this blog post will help folks who run into this issue figure out how to upgrade their XACT projects so they will work correctly with XNA Game Studio 4.0.

    Description of the issue

    If you have an existing XNA Game Studio 3.1 project that uses an XACT audio project, then you upgrade your project to XNA Game Studio 4.0, you will see an error like the following in the Visual Studio error list when you attempt to compile it with XNA Game Studio 4.0:

    The .xap file was created with a version of XACT that is incompatible with the XNA Framework Content Pipeline version used by this project. Refer to the documentation for options to resolve this mismatch.

    How to update an XACT project from XNA Game Studio 3.1 to the format required by XNA Game Studio 4.0

    Here are some more specific steps you can use to upgrade an XACT project used in XNA Game Studio 3.1 to the version of XACT required by XNA Game Studio 4.0:

    1. Make a backup copy of your .xap file if you would like to keep a copy of the .xap file from before upgrading it with the XACT tool.
    2. On a system with XNA Game Studio 4.0 installed, click on the Start menu, choose All Programs, then Microsoft XNA Game Studio 4.0 | Tools | Microsoft Cross-Platform Audio Creation Tool 3 (XACT3).
    3. In the Microsoft Cross-Platform Audio Creation Tool 3 (XACT3) tool, open the .xap file from the project that you upgraded from XNA Game Studio 3.1 to XNA Game Studio 4.0.  When it loads, you should see the following message in the XACT UI:

      ---------------------------
      XACT Version Mismatch
      ---------------------------
      This project file was created with the March 2009 release of XACT. You are running the February 2010 release.
      If you save this project, it will be saved as the current version and may no longer work with the version of
      XACT it was originally created with.
      ---------------------------
      OK  
      ---------------------------

    4. Click OK to upgrade the .xap project to the new February 2010 format.
    5. Save the .xap project in the XACT UI and close the XACT UI.
    6. Go back to Visual Studio 2010, open the project that you upgraded from XNA Game Studio 3.1 to 4.0 and choose to build it again.

    Additional notes about this error message

    The steps above explain how to upgrade an XACT project created with XNA Game Studio 3.1 to an XACT project that can be used with XNA Game Studio 4.0.  However, there are a few different scenarios where the “.xap file was created with a version of XACT that is incompatible with the XNA Framework Content Pipeline version used by this project” error message can occur, so the above workaround may not successfully resolve this error in all cases.

    Here are some of the possible configurations where this error will occur:

    • Attempting to compile an XNA Game Studio 4.0 project that was upgraded from XNA Game Studio 3.0 or 3.1 that includes an XACT project

      This is the scenario that the workaround above applies to

    • Attempting to compile an XNA Game Studio 3.1 project that includes an XACT2 project

      This is similar to the scenario that the workaround above applies to.  You can find more details about this scenario in this blog post.

    • Attempting to compile an XNA Game Studio 3.0 or 3.1 project that includes an XACT project created with the version of XACT that ships with XNA Game Studio 4.0

      This is the inverse of the above scenario. You need to create a new version of your XACT project using one of the XACT tools included with XNA Game Studio 3.1 at the following location on the start menu:  All Programs | Microsoft XNA Game Studio 3.1 | Tools.  You should use Microsoft Cross-Platform Audio Creation Tool 2 (XACT2) for XNA Game Studio 3.0 projects and Microsoft Cross-Platform Audio Creation Tool 3 (XACT3) for XNA Game Studio 3.1 projects.

    • Attempting to compile an XNA Game Studio 4.0 project that includes an XACT project created with a version of the XACT tool other than the one that ships with XNA Game Studio 4.0 (for example, the version of XACT in the DirectX SDK)

      This is similar to both of the above scenarios.  You need to make sure the XACT project is saved in the format of the version of XACT that ships with the version of XNA Game Studio that you are using.

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    XNA Game Studio Connect beta for XNA Game Studio 4.0 now available for download

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    Last week, we released XNA Game Studio 4.0 and the Windows Phone Developer Tools.  However, there was a slight delay in the release of the new XNA Game Studio Connect beta that allows you to deploy, run and debug 4.0 games on your Xbox 360.  As announced on the XNA team blog this morning, the XNA Game Studio Connect beta is now available for download on the Xbox LIVE Marketplace.

    You will need to delete the version of XNA Game Studio Connect that you have installed on your Xbox 360 console, then download the new one.  You can find more detailed steps in this blog post and this news item.

    If you are planning to use XNA Game Studio 4.0 for Xbox 360 game development, I encourage you to download and try out the XNA Game Studio Connect beta.  If you run into any issues, please report them at the following locations:

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    How to fix compatibility mode error that can appear when installing Windows Phone Developer Tools or Visual Studio 2010

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    I have heard from a few people who tried to install the final release of the Windows Phone Developer Tools but get an installation error like the following:

    Visual Studio setup cannot run in compatibility mode.
    For more information see the 'Installing' section in the Visual Studio readme at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=143397.

    The link in the error message points to the Visual Studio 2010 readme because this issue can affect all editions of Visual Studio 2010, including WPDT.  Item 2.1.10 in that readme provides a workaround for this issue.  In my past experience, that workaround has proven to be incomplete though, so here are some updated steps that usually help solve this type of error:

    1. Click on the start menu, choose Run, type regedit and click OK.
    2. Browse to each of the following keys and delete any value that refers to the WPDT setup program (named vm_web.exe):

      HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\AppCompatFlags\Compatibility Assistant\Persisted
      HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\AppCompatFlags\Layers
      HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\AppCompatFlags\Compatibility Assistant\Persisted
      HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\AppCompatFlags\Layers

    If the above doesn’t help, then you can also try to save vm_web.exe to your computer and run it from there.  When compatibility mode is triggered by Windows, it is based on a full path to the setup executable, so if you save it to a different location than you previously tried to run it from and then run it again, that can help avoid triggering compatibility mode.

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    How to reset the default deployment target in Windows Phone Developer Tools to the emulator

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    A few folks have noticed that after uninstalling pre-release builds of the Windows Phone Developer Tools and installing the final release, the default value for the deployment dropdown for Silverlight and XNA Game Studio 4.0 Windows Phone projects is the device instead of the emulator.  The default value is supposed to be set to the emulator in all cases, but in some cases, uninstalling previous builds of WPDT leaves behind some information that causes the default value to be reversed.  If you run into this, you can reset it by doing the following:

    1. Close any instances of the emulator and Visual Studio 2010 that are running on your computer
    2. Delete the folder named “%LocalAppData%\Microsoft\Phone Tools”
    3. Re-start Visual Studio 2010
  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Assembly references in XNA Game Studio 4.0 beta projects need to be updated after installing the final release

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    Since we released the final version of the Windows Phone Developer Tools and XNA Game Studio 4.0, I’ve heard from a few people who were using the beta version of the tools, upgraded to the final release, and ran into errors when compiling their XNA Game Studio 4.0 projects.  I want to describe the errors, the root cause and the fix in more detail in case anyone runs into this in the future.

    Description of this issue:

    After upgrading from the beta to the final release, some XNA Game Studio 4.0 projects created with the beta may fail to compile with errors like the following:

    Could not resolve this reference. Could not locate the assembly "Microsoft.Xna.Framework.Content.Pipeline.EffectImporter, Version=4.0.0.0, Culture=neutral, PublicKeyToken=6d5c3888ef60e27d, processorArchitecture=MSIL". Check to make sure the assembly exists on disk. If this reference is required by your code, you may get compilation errors.

    There was a breaking change in XNA Game Studio 4.0 between the beta and RTW that will require you to update any projects that you created with pre-release builds of the tools.  There is a note about this issue in the Breaking Changes for Windows Phone Developer Tools from Beta to RTM section of the release notes, but it is pretty easy to miss, and it doesn’t include searchable text that includes the exact error message:

    The public key token for XNA Framework assemblies has changed. Assembly references in content projects and game projects created using previous releases of Windows Phone Developer Tools must be updated to work correctly. You can do this by removing and re-adding references that do not resolve correctly using the References node in the Visual Studio Solution Explorer.

    The XNA Framework public key token value changed from 6d5c3888ef60e27d to 842cf8be1de50553 in the final release of XNA Game Studio 4.0.  This causes assembly references to XNA Framework assemblies in projects created before this change to no longer resolve correctly once you update to the final release of XNA Game Studio 4.0.

    How to resolve this issue:

    You can use the following specific steps to resolve this issue if you run into it for XNA Game Studio 4.0 projects created with pre-release builds of the tools:

    1. Go to the Visual Studio solution explorer
    2. Expand the References node for your game project(s) and content project(s)
    3. For any XNA Framework assembly references that do not resolve correctly, delete them by right-clicking and choosing Remove or just by pressing the Del key
    4. Right-click on the References node, choose Add Reference... and re-add any references that you removed in step 3

    References that do not resolve correctly will show up with a little yellow and black exclamation mark next to them like the content pipeline assemblies referenced by the content project in this example:

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Final versions of Windows Phone Developer Tools and XNA Game Studio 4.0 now available for download

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    As announced on the Windows Phone Developer Blog, the final release of the Windows Phone Developer Tools (WPDT) (which includes the final release of XNA Game Studio 4.0) is now available for download.

    Getting started links – Windows Phone Developer Tools

    Here are links to help you get started installing and using the Windows Phone Developer Tools:

    Here are links for documentation and support related to the Windows Phone Developer Tools:

    Getting started links – XNA Game Studio 4.0

    Here are links to help you get started installing and using XNA Game Studio 4.0:

    Note – deploying, running and debugging Xbox 360 games with XNA Game Studio 4.0 requires an updated version of XNA Game Studio Connect on the Xbox 360 console.  As noted on the XNA team blog, there will be a beta version of XNA Game Studio Connect that supports XNA Game Studio 4.0.  It was supposed to release today along with the final release of XNA Game Studio 4.0, but there have been some slight delays, and it will be released very soon.  Please keep an eye on the XNA team blog and the Creators Club site for an announcement when the XNA Game Studio Connect beta is available for download.

    Here are links for documentation and support related to XNA Game Studio 4.0:

    How to install Windows Phone Developer Tools

    Here are steps you can use to install the Windows Phone Developer Tools:

    1. If you have either of the previous Windows Phone Developer Tools CTPs or the beta installed, you will need to uninstall them first.  You can do that by going to the Programs and Features control panel and choosing to remove the item named Microsoft Windows Phone Developer Tools CTP – ENU or Microsoft Windows Phone Developer Tools Beta – ENU.  This item will remove the other components that need to be removed.
    2. If you have the Visual Studio 2010 RC on your system, you will also need to uninstall that before you can install WPDT.
    3. (optional) If you plan to also use another VS 2010 edition (such as Professional, Ultimate, C# Express, etc) in addition to WPDT, you should install them before you install WPDT.  If you install them after WPDT, you will be prompted to download and install a Silverlight update when trying to use them.
    4. After removing previous WPDT CTPs and beta and the VS 2010 RC (if you had it installed still) and installing other VS 2010 editions (if you choose to), you can proceed with installing WPDT.

    If you encounter setup failures

    If you run into an installation or uninstallation failure for the Windows Phone Developer Tools, you can use the log collection tool to gather your setup log files.  This log collection tool will create a file named %temp%\vslogs.cab.

    This tool does not gather XNA Game Studio 4.0 setup log files, so if your setup failure is caused by the XNA Game Studio 4.0 component, you’ll need to gather those logs separately by zipping up all of the logs in the folder named %temp%\XNA Game Studio 4.0 Setup\Logs.

    Once you have gathered your setup log files, you can upload them to a file server of your choice (such as http://skydrive.live.com), and post a link to the log files in the forums to get additional support.

    If you run into uninstallation issues with the WPDT CTP, CTP Refresh or Beta, you can use the information at http://blogs.msdn.com/b/astebner/archive/2010/07/12/10037442.aspx to remove XNA Game Studio or the Windows Phone Developer Tools.

    <update date="10/11/2010"> Fixed link to the release notes that was still pointing to old beta information. </update>

     

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    The final release of XNA Game Studio 4.0 is coming soon

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    Many folks noticed the recent post on the Windows Phone Developer Blog that announced a September 16, 2010 release date for the Windows Phone Developer Tools.  XNA Game Studio users have noted that CTP and beta versions of WPDT have included pre-release builds of XNA Game Studio 4.0, and they have asked whether that implies that XNA Game Studio 4.0 is shipping then as well.  Today, Kathleen posted more details about the answer to this question on the XNA team blog, and I wanted to summarize it here as well and provide a bit more detail about the scenarios that will be supported when XNA Game Studio 4.0 is released.

    When will XNA Game Studio 4.0 be available, and what will it include?

    The Windows Phone Developer Tools will ship on September 16, and XNA Game Studio 4.0 will also ship on September 16.  The final release of XNA Game Studio 4.0 will include the following:

    • Support for developing Windows and Xbox 360 games (tools, XNA Framework assemblies, Visual Studio 2010 integration, documentation, etc)
    • Support for developing Windows Phone games, but only if installed with the Windows Phone Developer Tools
    • Standalone XNA Framework Redistributable 4.0 for creating installers for Windows games

    Along with XNA Game Studio 4.0, we will be shipping a beta version of a version of XNA Game Studio Connect that will allow you to deploy, run and debug XNA Framework 4.0 Xbox 360 games if you have an XNA Creators Club premium membership.  We will release the final version of XNA Game Studio Connect in the future, but the API surface area will be the same because that is defined by the XNA Framework reference assemblies that ship with XNA Game Studio 4.0.  That means that once the final version of XNA Game Studio Connect is released, you should not have to make any code changes to your game in order to get it to run correctly.

    Where will I be able to get XNA Game Studio 4.0?

    XNA Game Studio 4.0 will be available to install as a part of the Windows Phone Developer Tools installer or via a standalone package.  Windows Phone Developer Tools setup will install the same XNA Game Studio 4.0 package that will be available as a standalone download, and it will install some additional components to enable Windows Phone development.  The supported scenarios differ somewhat based on how you choose to install XNA Game Studio 4.0.

    Windows Phone Developer Tools supports the following:

    • Windows Vista and Windows 7
    • Windows Phone game development in Visual Studio 2010 Professional or better and Visual Studio 2010 Express for Windows Phone
    • Xbox 360 and Windows game development in Visual Studio 2010 Professional or better, Visual C# 2010 Express and Visual Studio 2010 Express for Windows Phone
    • You do not need to install an edition of Visual Studio 2010 before installing Windows Phone Developer Tools

    The standalone XNA Game Studio 4.0 package supports the following:

    • Windows XP, Windows Vista and Windows 7
    • Xbox 360 and Windows game development in Visual Studio 2010 Professional or better and Visual C# 2010 Express
    • No Windows Phone game development – you must install Windows Phone Developer Tools to do this
    • You must install an edition of Visual Studio 2010 on your own before installing the standalone XNA Game Studio 4.0 package
  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    New knowledge base article with detection information for all versions of the .NET Framework

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    Microsoft has posted an updated knowledge base article today with a unified list of install state and service pack level detection information for each of the currently released versions of the .NET Framework (1.0, 1.1, 2.0, 3.0, 3.5 and 4).  You can find the knowledge base article at http://support.microsoft.com/kb/318785 and I encourage you to take a look if you have any scenarios where you need to detect .NET Framework install state information.

    Also, as a reminder, I have posted some sample code that demonstrates how to implement .NET Framework detection logic, and this type of example might be useful if you need to be able to detect the .NET Framework install state in your installer or your application code.

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Possible workarounds for XNA Game Studio setup errors caused by XnaLiveProxy

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    Every once in a while, I hear from a customer on the Creators Club forums or via my blog who cannot install XNA Game Studio due to a problem with the XnaLiveProxy component that is installed behind the scenes during setup.  I wanted to describe how I diagnose this type of issue and offer a few suggestions for working around this issue in case anyone runs into a similar problem in the future.

    How to diagnose this issue

    The first thing I do when XNA Game Studio setup fails is look at the setup log files.  XNA Game Studio setup automatically creates verbose setup log files at the following locations:

    • XNA Game Studio 2.0 - %ProgramFiles%\Microsoft XNA\XNA Game Studio\v2.0\Setup\Logs
    • XNA Game Studio 3.0 - %temp%\XNA Game Studio 3.0 Setup\Logs
    • XNA Game Studio 3.1 - %temp%\XNA Game Studio 3.1 Setup\Logs
    • XNA Game Studio 4.0 - %temp%\XNA Game Studio 4.0 Setup\Logs

    I sort the logs in this folder by modified date and then look for the most recent log file named GameStudioSetup*.log.  Then, I search for the string Bootstrapper.exe Error in this log file.  For this particular issue, the error in GameStudioSetup*.log will look like the following:

    Bootstrapper.exe Error: 0 : In Task InstallXnaLiveProxy: MSI Task Processor Failed on task: Copying XNA Game Studio files \n Please consult C:\Users\myusername\AppData\Local\Temp\XNA Game Studio 4.0 Setup\Logs\xnaliveproxy-20100724.150035.LOG for additional log information.

    This error message lists the name of an additional log file that will contain more detailed error information.  The next step I take is to search for the string return value 3 in the xnaliveproxy*.log file listed in the above error message.  For this particular issue, the error in xnaliveproxy*.log will look like the following:

    MSI (s) (7C:00) [12:34:56:789]: Product: Microsoft XNA Game Studio 4.0 (XnaLiveProxy) -- Error 1722. There is a problem with this Windows Installer package. A program run as part of the setup did not finish as expected. Contact your support personnel or package vendor.  Action InitializeXnaLiveProxy, location: C:\Program Files\Microsoft XNA\XNA Game Studio\v4.0\Bin\XnaLiveProxy.exe, command: /install

    How to work around this issue

    Here are some possible causes and suggested workarounds for this error:

    1.  A problem with Games for Windows – LIVE

    To work around this issue, I recommend going to the Programs and Features control panel, removing the item named Microsoft Games for Windows – LIVE Redistributable, installing the latest version of Games for Windows – LIVE, then trying to run XNA Game Studio (or Windows Phone Developer Tools) setup again.

    2.  A problem with the DirectX 9.0c runtime files

    If the above doesn’t help, then I recommend trying to install the DirectX 9.0c redistributable using the standalone web installer, then trying to run XNA Game Studio (or Windows Phone Developer Tools) setup again.

    3.  A problem with the .NET Framework

    If neither of the above help, then I recommend trying to uninstall + re-install the .NET Framework 3.5 or 3.5 SP1 (if you are trying to install XNA Game Studio 3.0 or 3.1) or the .NET Framework 4 (if you are trying to install XNA Game Studio 4.0, then trying to run XNA Game Studio (or Windows Phone Developer Tools) setup again.

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Installing offline documentation for Windows Phone Developer Tools

    • 4 Comments

    The Windows Phone Developer Tools CTPs and Beta have only offered online documentation for general Windows Phone developer topics and Silverlight Windows Phone application development topics.  However, it is possible to use the Visual Studio 2010 Help Library Manager to download an offline copy of the Windows Phone developer documentation.  Here are the steps I’ve used to do this on my computer:

    1. Launch Help Library Manager.  To do this, open Visual Studio 2010 or Windows Phone Developer Tools, click on the Help menu and choose Manage Help Settings.
    2. If you have never run Help Library Manager before, you will have to first select a local path to download the content to.  This dialog looks like the following:

      Help Library Manager local content location
    3. After selecting a local path, the main Help Library Manager page will appear.  Click on the link named Install content from online.  This dialog looks like the following:

      Help Library Manager main page
    4. In the list of online content, scroll to the bottom, locate the item named Windows Phone Development and click the Add link.  This dialog looks like the following:

      Help Library Manager install from online
    5. If you would like, you can also use the Help Library Manager to install offline content for other technologies like the .NET Framework, the Windows SDK, etc.

    XNA Game Studio 4.0, which is installed as a part of the Windows Phone Developer Tools setup process, installs a CHM file with offline documentation, but the CHM file can only be launched via the shortcut on the Windows start menu (located at All Programs | Microsoft XNA Game Studio 4.0 | XNA Game Studio Documentation).  The CHM cannot by pressing F1 while working on an XNA Game Studio project in the Visual Studio IDE.

    We are planning to make the XNA Game Studio 4.0 documentation available for offline download via the Help Library Manager in the future.  Once we do that, you will be able to download and install the documentation in the same way that I described above for the Windows Phone Development documentation.  After installing the offline documentation using Help Library Manager, you will be able to access the documentation by pressing F1 while working on an XNA Game Studio project in the Visual Studio IDE.

    <update date="7/30/2010"> Updated the first step in this post with an easier way to launch Help Library Manager. </update>

     

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Link to a survey about the .NET Framework 4 setup and deployment experience

    • 2 Comments

    Peter Marcu has posted a new survey on his blog that I wanted to link to here in order to try to help him get more responses.  He's looking for feedback about changes made to the setup and deployment experience for the .NET Framework 4 to help determine how to continue to improve the experience in future versions of the .NET Framework.

    If you are a developer working on the deployment of applications that require the .NET Framework, I encourage you to check out his blog post at http://blogs.msdn.com/b/pmarcu/archive/2010/07/16/do-you-deploy-a-managed-app-part-2.aspx and post comments there or send him an email to share your experiences and suggestions for improvements.

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Possible issues uninstalling the Windows Phone Developer Tools CTP Refresh and installing the RTW version

    • 9 Comments

    Note - I originally wrote this blog post when the Windows Phone Developer Tools Beta was released, but the information is also useful when trying to install the RTW version.  I'm going to update some of the links from this post to point to the WPDT RTW version instead of the beta version.

    As noted in my previous blog post, the Windows Phone Developer Tools RTW was released recently.  Since the RTW version was released, we’ve heard from some people who have had problems uninstalling the previous WPDT CTP builds from their computer in order to be able to install the RTW version.  There are 2 specific types of issues that I’ve seen, so I want to describe each of them in a bit more detail in case anyone reading my blog in the future runs into similar problems.

    Issue 1 – WPDT CTP uninstall will not proceed due to missing components

    In this scenario, the WPDT CTP or CTP Refresh uninstall process detects that some optional components (Silverlight 4 Tools, XNA Game Studio 4.0 and/or XNA Game Studio 4.0 Windows Phone Extensions) are not present, and it forces you to re-install those components before being allowed to uninstall the WPDT CTP.

    In most cases, you can simply allow setup to re-download and re-install the missing components, then run setup again and uninstall the CTP.  The steps to accomplish this are documented in this blog post.  This post describes CTP uninstall, but equivalent steps can be used for CTP Refresh uninstall as well.

    Sometimes, the re-download and re-install of these components can also fail.  If you encounter this type of failure, you can download the XNA Game Studio cleanup tool and choose the option in that tool to uninstall the Windows Phone Developer Tools as a last resort.  After the uninstall completes, you can proceed with the installation of the WPDT RTW.

    Note – the underlying problem with WPDT setup that causes it to force you to re-install components in order to uninstall the product is a known bug that existed in the CTP and CTP Refresh and has been fixed in the Beta and in the RTW version.  However, since the bug was present in the CTP Refresh, it still impacts scenarios where you try to uninstall the CTP Refresh in order to move forward to RTW.  You should not see this type of issue when uninstalling the Beta or RTW versions of WPDT.

    Issue 2 – WPDT RTW install will not proceed because of incompatible components

    In this scenario, the WPDT RTW setup process blocks you from installing because it detects that incompatible components are still installed on your computer.  In some cases, this can happen even after uninstalling the CTP builds as described above in Issue 1.

    I use the steps like the following to diagnose and resolve this issue:

    1. Open the file %temp%\dd_install_vm_xcor_100.txt and determine the exact components that WPDT setup has identified as incompatible.  The incompatible products will generate log file entries like the following:

      [07/12/10,10:49:40] VS Scenario: ***ERRORLOG EVENT*** : Error: CVSScenario::ExecuteEachBlocker returned false
      [07/12/10,10:49:40] Setup.exe: AddGlobalCustomProperty
      [07/12/10,10:49:40] VS Scenario: ***ERRORLOG EVENT*** : Error:There is a blocking condition met, the installer is blocking because of Section :
      [07/12/10,10:49:40] Setup.exe: AddGlobalCustomProperty
      [07/12/10,10:49:40] VS Scenario: ***ERRORLOG EVENT*** : Microsoft Visual C# Express 2010
    2. Look in the WPDT setup data file named blocker.sdb to determine the exact registry key that is being used to detect each incompatible product.  Blocker.sdb is located in the vm_web.exe self-extracting setup package, and I have posted an extracted copy at this location.  For the product in the above example, the information in blocker.sdb looks like the following:

      [Microsoft Visual C# Express 2010]
      VersionCheck=RegVerBuildCheck
      DetectKey=HKLM,SOFTWARE\Microsoft\DevDiv\vcs\Servicing\10.0\xcor
      DetectKeyVal=Version
      DetectKeyValData=30319.01

      This means that setup will block if the registry key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\DevDiv\vcs\Servicing\10.0\xcor@Version exists and the value is less than 30319.01.

      There is one subtle issue here - the WPDT setup is a 32-bit application, so that means that the registry location will be different on a 64-bit version of Windows.  In the example above, the registry key will be at HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Wow6432Node\Microsoft\DevDiv\vcs\Servicing\10.0\xcor@Version.
    3. Use the Programs and Features control panel to uninstall the product that is triggering the block.  In some cases, uninstalling the product will not remove the registry key that WPDT setup is checking for in blocker.sdb.  In those cases, you may have to manually rename or change the registry value so that the block will no longer be triggered.

    If you run into WPDT CTP uninstall issues or RTW install issues that are not solved by the above suggestions, you can use the log collection tool to gather your setup log files.  This log collection tool will create a file named %temp%\vslogs.cab.  This tool does not gather XNA Game Studio 4.0 setup log files, so if your setup failure is caused by the XNA Game Studio 4.0 component, you’ll need to gather those logs separately by zipping up all of the logs in the folder named %temp%\XNA Game Studio 4.0 Setup\Logs.  Once you have gathered your setup log files, you can upload them to a file server of your choice (such as http://skydrive.live.com), and post a link to the log files in the forums or in a comment on my blog to get additional support.

    <update date="7/13/2010"> Updated the link for uninstall steps to point at a new CTP Refresh-specific blog post instead of the old MIX CTP blog post. </update>

     <update date="7/14/2010"> Added a note about where to find the blocking registry keys on 64-bit versions of Windows. </update>

     <update date="10/14/2010"> Updated the post to refer to WPDT RTW instead of the WPDT beta. </update>

     

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Windows Phone Developer Tools Beta and XNA Game Studio 4.0 Beta now available for download

    • 24 Comments

    As announced on the Windows Phone Developer Blog, a Windows Phone Developer Tools (WPDT) Beta (which includes an XNA Game Studio 4.0 Beta as well) was released for download today.

    Getting Started links

    Here are links to help you get started installing and using the Windows Phone Developer Tools Beta:

    Documentation links

    Here are some links to useful documentation to help you get started with the Windows Phone Developer Tools Beta:

    Support links

    Here are some links if you run into questions or issues with the Windows Phone Developer Tools Beta:

    How to install

    Here are steps you can use to install the Windows Phone Developer Tools Beta:

    1. If you have either of the previous Windows Phone Developer Tools CTPs installed, you will need to uninstall them first.  You can do that by going to the Programs and Features control panel and choosing to remove the item named Microsoft Windows Phone Developer Tools CTP – ENU.  This item will remove the other components that need to be removed.
    2. If you have the Visual Studio 2010 RC on your system, you will also need to uninstall that before you can install the WPDT Beta.
    3. (optional) If you plan to also use another VS 2010 edition (such as Professional, Ultimate, C# Express, etc) in addition to WPDT, you should install them before you install the WPDT Beta.  If you install them after the WPDT Beta, you will be prompted to download and install a Silverlight update when trying to use them.
    4. After removing previous WPDT CTPs and the VS 2010 RC (if you had it installed still) and installing other VS 2010 editions (if you choose to), you can proceed with installing the WPDT Beta.

    If you encounter Windows Phone Developer Tools Beta setup failures

    If you run into an installation or uninstallation failure for the Windows Phone Developer Tools Beta, you can use the log collection tool to gather your setup log files.  This log collection tool will create a file named %temp%\vslogs.cab.

    This tool does not gather XNA Game Studio 4.0 setup log files, so if your setup failure is caused by the XNA Game Studio 4.0 component, you’ll need to gather those logs separately by zipping up all of the logs in the folder named %temp%\XNA Game Studio 4.0 Setup\Logs.

    Once you have gathered your setup log files, you can upload them to a file server of your choice (such as http://skydrive.live.com), and post a link to the log files in the forums to get additional support.

    If you run into uninstallation issues with the WPDT CTP, CTP Refresh or Beta, you can use the cleanup tool described at http://blogs.msdn.com/astebner/pages/9544320.aspx to remove XNA Game Studio or the Windows Phone Developer Tools.

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Possible installation problems with .NET Framework 2.0, 3.0 and 3.5 hotfixes that can remove assemblies from the GAC

    • 2 Comments

    A couple of new knowledge base articles related to failed installations of .NET Framework 2.0, 3.0 and 3.5 hotfixes were published this week that I want to link to in order to hopefully help provide more visibility into the issues that they describe.  You can find the articles at the following locations:

    Summary of the issue

    To summarize the issues described in these knowledge base articles, hotfixes for the .NET Framework 2.0, 3.0 and 3.5 can fail to install if the hotfix attempts to update an assembly that is installed in the global assembly cache (GAC) and that assembly is held in use with a hard lock by another application running on the system.  To make matters worse, when a .NET Framework hotfix fails to install due to hard-locked files, the original file can end up being removed from the GAC entirely, which can cause .NET Framework applications to fail to run correctly on the system afterwards.

    In general, hard locks are very rare and very few applications will load .NET Framework assemblies in a way that causes them to be hard-locked.  There is a tool described in this blog post that can be used to simulate hard locks if you need to test this type of scenario.

    This issue only affects hotfixes for MSI-based versions of the .NET Framework (so it will not affect the .NET Framework 2.0 or 3.0 on Windows Vista or the .NET Framework 2.0, 3.0 or 3.5 on Windows 7 for example).

    How to diagnose the issue

    In this type of scenario, you may see an error that looks like the following in the verbose log file for the .NET Framework hotfix (the exact file name in the error message will vary depending on what hotfix you are installing and what files are hard-locked):

    07/01/10 11:30:00 DDSet_Error: Failed to install assembly 'C:\WINDOWS\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v2.0.50727\System.EnterpriseServices.dll' because of system error: The process cannot access the file because it is being used by another process.

    07/01/10 11:30:00 DDSet_Error: Failed to install assembly 'C:\WINDOWS\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v2.0.50727\System.EnterpriseServices.dll' because of system error: Access is denied.

    If any files are removed from the GAC during the failing .NET Framework hotfix installation, the .NET Framework setup verification tool will report that one or more files is missing from your system.

    How to resolve the issue

    If you encounter this error, you can resolve it by doing the following:

    1. Repair or uninstall + re-install the .NET Framework (using these steps if necessary)
    2. Make sure that any .NET Framework files are no longer in use by using the steps in this knowledge base article
    3. Attempt to install the .NET Framework hotfix again
  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Link with information about expert settings in Visual Studio 2010 Express for Windows Phone

    • 2 Comments

    If you have used previous versions of XNA Game Studio, particularly if you do cross-platform game development, you are probably used to seeing the following drop downs on the standard toolbar in the Visual Studio IDE:

    • Solution Configurations drop down (which contains options like Debug and Release)
    • Solution Platforms drop down (which contains options like x86, Windows Phone, Xbox 360, Mixed Platforms, etc)

    The Visual Studio 2010 Express for Windows Phone IDE that comes with the Windows Phone Developer Tools does not include either of the above drop downs on the standard toolbar by default, and it took me a little while to figure out the set of steps required to add them.

    Fortunately, my colleague Michael Klucher documented these steps in a recent post on his blog (complete with step-by-step instructions and screenshots) to make it easier for folks who want to use these drop downs.  I encourage you to check out his blog post if you would like to enable the Solution Configurations and Solution Platforms drop downs in Visual Studio 2010 Express for Windows Phone.

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Possible problem installing Windows Phone Developer Tools CTP Refresh on a system with Silverlight 4 installed

    • 6 Comments

    Yesterday, I investigated a Windows Phone Developer Tools CTP Refresh installation issue on a colleague’s computer, and I wanted to describe what I found in case anyone else runs into a similar issue.

    Description of the issue

    Silverlight 4 was posted on Microsoft Update earlier this week, and I found that if this version of Silverlight is installed on a computer prior to running setup for the Windows Phone Developer Tools CTP Refresh, it will cause WPDT setup to fail while it tries to install Silverlight 4.  The error in the log file named %temp%\dd_install_vm_xcor_100.txt looks like the following:

    [06/04/10,12:34:56] Microsoft Silverlight 4.0: ***ERRORLOG EVENT*** : Error code 1502 for this component means "The event log file is full."

    Unfortunately, this error message is misleading, and it does not help to try to clear out your event logs in this scenario.  I narrowed this down further by having my colleague run the Silverlight 4 setup in full UI mode from the WPDT setup location.  When doing that, it displays an error message stating that a later version of Silverlight is already installed.

    How to work around the issue

    If you run into this error while trying to install the WPDT CTP Refresh, you can solve it by doing the following:

    1. Go to the Programs and Feature control panel.
    2. Locate the item named Microsoft Silverlight and uninstall it.
    3. Re-run WPDT setup.

    This issue will be addressed in a future release of the Windows Phone Developer Tools.

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    How to create an administrative install point for the .NET Framework 4

    • 20 Comments

    I previously wrote a blog post listing the silent install, repair and uninstall command line parameters for the .NET Framework 4.  Since then, I’ve gotten questions from a few folks who are trying to deploy the .NET Framework 4 in ways that require them to run the MSIs directly instead of using the setup executable (for example, via Group Policy or WMI).  Here are some steps you can use to extract the .NET Framework 4 setup package and create administrative install points for the MSIs that are a part of the .NET Framework 4:

    1. Download the .NET Framework 4 standalone installer and save it to your hard drive
    2. Run the following command to extract the contents of the .NET Framework 4 installer:  dotNetFx40_Full_x86_x64.exe /x:c:\dotnetfx4
    3. Run the following command to create an administrative install point for the .NET Framework 4 core x86:  msiexec /a c:\dotnetfx4\netfx_Core_x86.msi EXTUI=1 TARGETDIR=c:\dotnetfx4\AIP\netfx_core_x86
    4. Run the following command to create an administrative install point for the .NET Framework 4 core x64:  msiexec /a c:\dotnetfx4\netfx_Core_x64.msi EXTUI=1 TARGETDIR=c:\dotnetfx4\AIP\netfx_core_x64
    5. Run the following command to create an administrative install point for the .NET Framework 4 extended x86:  msiexec /a c:\dotnetfx4\netfx_Extended_x86.msi EXTUI=1 TARGETDIR=c:\dotnetfx4\AIP\netfx_extended_x86
    6. Run the following command to create an administrative install point for the .NET Framework 4 extended x64:  msiexec /a c:\dotnetfx4\netfx_Extended_x64.msi EXTUI=1 TARGETDIR=c:\dotnetfx4\AIP\netfx_extended_x64

    Once you’ve created the administrative install points described above, you should be able to install the MSIs in the administrative install point folders directly or use steps like the ones previously published for the .NET Framework 2.0 to create Group Policy objects to deploy the .NET Framework 4.  When doing this, you will need to apply an additional transform to each of the MSI files to prevent the installation from blocking you and telling you to run setup.exe instead.  I have created an example transform that you can download from here for this scenario.  The transform changes the condition for CA_BlockDirectInstall to False so it will not be run during the installation process.

    Important note: when creating administrative install points and installing the .NET Framework 4 MSIs directly, it is your responsibility to install all of the prerequisites for these MSIs onto the target computer prior to attempting to install the MSIs.  This includes the OS prerequisites listed here plus the OS update (.msu) files that are packaged with the .NET Framework 4 if you are running setup on Windows Vista or higher.  If you do not install these prerequisites, then installing the MSIs will fail.

    <update date="6/17/2010"> Added a link to a transform that can be used to bypass the custom actions in the .NET Framework 4 MSIs that prevent installing the MSI drectly and tell you to run setup.exe instead. </update>

     

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Updated versions of .NET Framework cleanup and verification tools that work with the .NET Framework 4

    • 18 Comments

    Over the past week or so, I finally found some time to update the .NET Framework cleanup and verification tools to support the recently released .NET Framework 4 product family.  I have uploaded new versions of both tools, and you can find more information about the tools and download links in their users guides.  Here are links for the users guides for each of these tools:

    As always, please let me know if you run into any bugs, questions or feature suggestions while using either of these tools.  I would prefer that you post a comment on the user’s guide blog posts so the comments will be visible to other users as well, but you can also send me an email.

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Silent install, repair and uninstall command lines for the .NET Framework 4

    • 102 Comments

    I have previously posted command lines that can be used to install, repair and uninstall the versions of the .NET Framework in silent mode and unattended mode.  Now that the .NET Framework 4 has shipped, I wanted to post an equivalent set of steps to install, repair and uninstall the .NET Framework 4 Client Profile and Full.

    The .NET Framework 4 uses a different setup chainer than in previous versions of the .NET Framework.  As a result, the command lines are somewhat different than in previous releases.  There are also a few differences in how the repair and uninstall processes work that I wanted to call out specifically:

    • There are different repair and uninstall command lines for 32-bit and 64-bit versions of the .NET Framework 4
    • The .NET Framework 4 includes both a client profile and a full version.  Uninstalling the full version requires 2 steps – one to uninstall the extended component and another to uninstall the client profile.

    .NET Framework 4 product family

    .NET Framework 4 Client Profile (32-bit) – silent repair

    %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\SetupCache\Client\setup.exe /repair /x86 /x64 /ia64 /parameterfolder Client /q /norestart

    .NET Framework 4 Client Profile (32-bit) – unattended repair

    %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\SetupCache\Client\setup.exe /repair /x86 /x64 /ia64 /parameterfolder Client /passive /norestart

    .NET Framework 4 Client Profile (32-bit) – silent uninstall

    %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\SetupCache\Client\setup.exe /uninstall /x86 /x64 /parameterfolder Client /q /norestart

    .NET Framework 4 Client Profile (32-bit) – unattended uninstall

    %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\SetupCache\Client\setup.exe /uninstall /x86 /x64 /parameterfolder Client /passive /norestart

    .NET Framework 4 Client Profile (64-bit) – silent repair

    %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\SetupCache\Client\setup.exe /repair /x86 /x64 /ia64 /parameterfolder Client /q /norestart

    .NET Framework 4 Client Profile (64-bit) – unattended repair

    %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\SetupCache\Client\setup.exe /repair /x86 /x64 /ia64 /parameterfolder Client /passive /norestart

    .NET Framework 4 Client Profile (64-bit) – silent uninstall

    %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\SetupCache\Client\setup.exe /uninstall /x86 /x64 /parameterfolder Client /q /norestart

    .NET Framework 4 Client Profile (64-bit) – unattended uninstall

    %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\SetupCache\Client\setup.exe /uninstall /x86 /x64 /parameterfolder Client /passive /norestart

    .NET Framework 4 Full (32-bit) – silent repair

    %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\SetupCache\Client\setup.exe /repair /x86 /x64 /ia64 /parameterfolder Client /q /norestart

    .NET Framework 4 Full (32-bit) – unattended repair

    %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\SetupCache\Client\setup.exe /repair /x86 /x64 /ia64 /parameterfolder Client /passive /norestart

    .NET Framework 4 Full (32-bit) – silent uninstall

    %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\SetupCache\Extended\setup.exe /uninstall /x86 /x64 /ia64 /parameterfolder Extended /q /norestart

    %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\SetupCache\Client\setup.exe /uninstall /x86 /x64 /parameterfolder Client /q /norestart

    .NET Framework 4 Full (32-bit) – unattended uninstall

    %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\SetupCache\Extended\setup.exe /uninstall /x86 /x64 /ia64 /parameterfolder Extended /passive /norestart

    %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework\v4.0.30319\SetupCache\Client\setup.exe /uninstall /x86 /x64 /parameterfolder Client /passive /norestart

    .NET Framework 4 Full (64-bit) – silent repair

    %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\SetupCache\Client\setup.exe /repair /x86 /x64 /ia64 /parameterfolder Client /q /norestart

    .NET Framework 4 Full (64-bit) – unattended repair

    %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\SetupCache\Client\setup.exe /repair /x86 /x64 /ia64 /parameterfolder Client /passive /norestart

    .NET Framework 4 Full (64-bit) – silent uninstall

    %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\SetupCache\Extended\setup.exe /uninstall /x86 /x64 /ia64 /parameterfolder Extended /q /norestart

    %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\SetupCache\Client\setup.exe /uninstall /x86 /x64 /parameterfolder Client /q

    .NET Framework 4 Full (64-bit) – unattended uninstall

    %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\SetupCache\Extended\setup.exe /uninstall /x86 /x64 /ia64 /parameterfolder Extended /passive /norestart

    %windir%\Microsoft.NET\Framework64\v4.0.30319\SetupCache\Client\setup.exe /uninstall /x86 /x64 /parameterfolder Client /passive /norestart 

    <update date="6/1/2010"> Fixed incorrect command lines for uninstall of the .NET Framework 4 extended. </update>

     

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Offline install options for the Windows Phone Developer Tools CTP Refresh

    • 0 Comments

    I have heard from a few folks who have had trouble getting the web download bootstrapper for the Windows Phone Developer Tools CTP Refresh working correctly in their network environment.  Unfortunately, the CTP Refresh only ships as a web download bootstrapper and not as a full install package that can be downloaded as a single package and installed offline without requiring Internet connectivity.  However, there are a couple of options that can be used as workarounds in case you run into problems with the web download bootstrapper:

    1. A customer created a full install ISO file for the WPDT CTP Refresh that can be burned to a CD and installed offline.  You can find more information in this blog post.

    2. You can use information in the setup data files for the WPDT CTP Refresh to assemble your own network install layout.  The instructions in this blog post are from the Visual Studio 2008 Express Editions, but the same type of technique will also work for the WPDT CTP Refresh because it uses the same installation engine as the other editions of Visual Studio.
  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Mailbag: How to detect the presence of the Visual C++ 2010 redistributable package

    • 58 Comments

    Question:

    I have seen your previous blog posts that describe how to detect the presence of the Visual C++ 2005 redistributable package and the Visual C++ 2008 redistributable package.  I am creating an installer that requires the Visual C++ 2010 runtime files.  How can I detect the presence of the Visual C++ 2010 redistributable package?

    Answer:

    Unlike the Visual C++ 2005 and 2008 redistributable packages, there are registry keys that can be used to detect the presence of the Visual C++ 2010 redistributable package.

    Visual C++ 2010 redistributable package detection registry values




    Alternatively, like in past releases of the Visual C++ redistributable package, you can use an algorithm like the one I described in my previous blog posts to detect the presence of the Visual C++ 2010 redistributable package on a system:

    1. Call the MsiQueryProductState API
    2. Pass in the product code for the package that you want to detect based on the list below
    3. Check the return value of this API.  If it is anything other than INSTALLSTATE_DEFAULT, the package is not yet installed

    Visual C++ 2010 redistributable package product codes

    Visual C++ 2010 SP1 redistributable package product codes

    <update date="4/12/2011"> Added product codes for Visual C++ 2010 SP1 redistributable packages. </update>

     

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    How to install the Windows Phone Developer Tools on Windows Server 2008

    • 65 Comments

    The Windows Phone Developer Tools are not officially supported on operating systems other than Windows Vista or Windows 7.  In between the CTP and the CTP Refresh, a block was added to setup to prevent installing on Windows Server 2008 to help enforce this support limitation.  I’ve heard from some folks who were using the original CTP on Windows Server 2008 who cannot move forward to the CTP Refresh or the final release because of this block.

    There is a way you can work around the Windows Server 2008 setup block if needed.  Please note that this is not officially supported, so if you try these steps, you are doing so at your own risk.

    1. Download the Windows Phone Developer Tools web bootstrapper and save it to your hard drive
    2. Extract the contents of the setup package by running vm_web.exe /x and choosing a path to extract to
    3. Go to the folder you extracted to in step 2 and open the file baseline.dat in notepad
    4. Look for the section named [gencomp7788]

      Note - you have to change this exact section - this is the one that controls the OS version blocking behavior in Windows Phone Developer Tools setup.
       
    5. Change the value InstallOnLHS from 1 to 0
    6. Change the value InstallOnWin7Server from 1 to 0
    7. Save and close baseline.dat
    8. Run setup.exe /web from the folder you extracted to in step 2

      Note - please make sure that you include the /web command line parameter in step 8.  If you don't, setup will not attempt to download the packages it needs to install, and it will fail to install correctly as a result.

    <update date="9/17/2010"> Added an emphasis on steps 4 and 8 - setup will fail if you don't pass in the /web switch when using these steps.  Also updated the steps for the final RTW build of Windows Phone Developer Tools. </update>

     

  • Aaron Stebner's WebLog

    Windows Phone Developer Tools CTP Refresh and XNA Game Studio 4.0 CTP Refresh now available for download

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    As announced on the Windows Phone Developer Blog, a Windows Phone Developer Tools (WPDT) CTP Refresh (which includes an XNA Game Studio 4.0 CTP Refresh as well) was released for download today.

    Getting Started links

    Here are links to help you get started installing and using the Windows Phone Developer Tools CTP Refresh:

    Breaking changes

    Please make sure to look at the Breaking Changes section of the release notes – there are a few key issues there that you will need to keep in mind if you have projects created with the WPDT CTP, including the following:

    • Authenticode-signed assemblies included in the game project will cause the game to fail to deploy or load.  This issue and a workaround for it are covered in much more detail in this blog post.
    • XNA Game Studio Windows Phone games will now default to landscape mode instead of portrait mode, but unfortunately, landscape mode games do not display correctly in the emulator yet.  You will need to specify a 480x800 screen resolution if you don’t already.
    • Keyboard input is not working in the emulator in the CTP Refresh.  You cannot rely on keyboard input to control your game in the emulator in this release.

    What’s new

    The primary reason for the CTP Refresh is to support Windows Phone development in the final release of Visual Studio 2010 instead of in the VS 2010 RC.  For an overall list of what’s new in the CTP Refresh, I encourage you to take a look at the links in this blog post and this MSDN topic.

    The CTP Refresh includes the following XNA Game Studio 4.0 changes:

    • APIs for scalars and orientation (although, unfortunately, this functionality still does not work correctly in the emulator – landscape mode games will not render correctly in the emulator in the CTP Refresh)
    • Support for incremental deployment of Windows Phone Game projects
    • A new Visual Studio property page that contains Reach/Hi-Def profile selection, a game thumbnail chooser and a game startup object chooser
    • Fixed some side-by-side issues with previous versions of XNA Game Studio.  After uninstalling the CTP Refresh, you will have to re-install the XNA Game Studio Platform Tools from %ProgramFiles%\Microsoft XNA\XNA Game Studio\v3.1\Setup\xnags_platform_tools.msi, but you should not need to do a full repair of previous versions of XNA Game Studio anymore
    • Added better error reporting for some Windows Phone deployment and debugging scenarios
    • Updated documentation

    How to install

    Here are steps you can use to install the Windows Phone Developer Tools CTP Refresh

    1. If you have the original Windows Phone Developer Tools CTP installed, you will need to uninstall it first.  You can do that by going to the Programs and Features control panel and choosing to remove the item named Microsoft Windows Phone Developer Tools CTP – ENU.  This item will remove the other components that need to be removed.

    2. If you have the Visual Studio 2010 RC on your system, you will also need to uninstall that before you can install the WPDT CTP Refresh.

    3. (optional) If you plan to also use another VS 2010 edition (such as Professional, Ultimate, C# Express, etc) in addition to WPDT, you should install them before you install the WPDT CTP Refresh.  If you install them after the WPDT CTP, you will be prompted to download and install a Silverlight update when trying to use them.

    4. After removing the WPDT CTP and the VS 2010 RC (if you had it installed still) and installing other VS 2010 editions (if you choose to), you can proceed with installing the WPDT CTP Refresh.

    If you encounter Windows Phone Developer Tools CTP Refresh setup failures

    If you run into an installation or uninstallation failure for the Windows Phone Developer Tools CTP, you can use the log collection tool to gather your setup log files.  This log collection tool will create a file named %temp%\vslogs.cab.

    This tool does not gather XNA Game Studio 4.0 setup log files, so if your setup failure is caused by the XNA Game Studio 4.0 component, you’ll need to gather those logs separately by zipping up all of the logs in the folder named %temp%\XNA Game Studio 4.0 Setup\Logs.

    Once you have gathered your setup log files, you can upload them to a file server of your choice (such as http://skydrive.live.com), and post a link to the log files in the forums to get additional support.

    If you run into uninstallation issues with the WPDT CTP or the CTP Refresh, you can use the cleanup tool described at http://blogs.msdn.com/astebner/pages/9544320.aspx to remove XNA Game Studio or the Windows Phone Developer Tools.

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