Beat Schwegler's 2 Cents

It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent, but the ones most responsive to change - Charles Darwin

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  • Blog Post: Web Services Quiz: Issue 10 - the Answer

    The correct answer to Issue 10 was already mentioned by Andrew & Mario : Service T1 will deny access, and therefore return a HTTP status 401 error: “Access Denied” If we want to allow the called services to impersonate the caller’s identity, we have to explicitly pass on its credentials. In the default...
  • Blog Post: Link to the XSD Object Generator download site

    For all who attended my Web Services Competency Workshop in Madrid : Here’s a link to the XSDObjectGen.exe tool.
  • Blog Post: Interested in Z#?

    A. Wöß and H. Mössenböck from the University of Linz just published the following courseware: Compiler Construction - Concepts and Practical Application to .NET This course builds a complete compiler for the programming language Z# (= subset of C#) that produces .NET executables. It will teach students...
  • Blog Post: What's wrong with rpc-literal?

    This post is part of Issue 8’s answer To say it as clear and simple as possible: rpc style encoding is more about the service implementation than the message on the wire itself. That’s just wrong! As already discussed in this answer series , every rpc-literal message can be described using doc-literal...
  • Blog Post: How to consume an rpc-literal WS using .NET?

    This post is part of Issue 8’s answer The previous post in this answer series discussed rpc-literal from a platform independent standpoint, where this post focuses on the consumption of such services using .NET . You may ask why consumption only? Well, rpc-literal is so bad that you won’t use it for...
  • Blog Post: What is rpc-literal anyway?

    Although it’s a longtime ago, I want to follow up with the promised explanations for Issue 8 : Prolog: WS BP 1.0 prohibits the usage of rpc-encoded but explicitly allows rpc-literal. But what is rpc-literal anyway? Rpc stands for remote procedure call. If you want to apply this technology in loosely...
  • Blog Post: "Visual Studio 2005 Team System" (aka Burton) gets its own Blog ...

    http://blogs.msdn.com/askburton
  • Blog Post: Security Roadshow for Developers: All Slides and Demos are Online ...

    Back from the road again… The Security Roadshow for Developers was a true success. For many attendees it was the start of a long journey… All the slides and demos can be found here
  • Blog Post: Web Services Quiz: Issue 8 - the Answer

    The number one problem in dealing with rpc-literal Web Services is the fact that they are unsupported on the .NET platform, yet. However, every rpc-literal message can be “built” using a doc-literal based implementations. By doing so, the .NET stub for the WSDL defined in Issue 8 may look the following...
  • Blog Post: Web Services Quiz: Issue 8

    Given the following WSDL, how does your .NET proxy and stub look like? As always, answer and explanation will follow… Note, it’s rpc-literal … <? xml version ="1.0" encoding ="utf-8"?> < wsdl:definitions targetNamespace ="uri.test.com" xmlns : wsdl ="http...
  • Blog Post: Web Services Quiz: Issue 7 - the Answer

    The answer to Issue 7 is the following: < wsdl:binding name ="CalculatorSoap" type ="tns:CalculatorPortType"> < soap:binding style ="rpc" transport ="http://schemas.xmlsoap.org/soap/http"/> < wsdl:operation name ="Add"> < soap:operation soapAction ="uri.test.com/add...
  • Blog Post: .NET CodeDOM Demystified - the Recording

    The recorded MSDN CodeDOM Webcast can be found here .
  • Blog Post: Web Services Quiz: Issue 7

    The following Issue arose out of several enquires. Here is the consolidated question: How does the corresponding SOAP binding look like if you want to get a WS-I compliant WSDL? As always, answer and explanation will follow… <? xml version ="1.0" encoding ="utf-8"?> < wsdl...
  • Blog Post: .NET CodeDOM Demystified - the Demos

    The demos are now available for download!
  • Blog Post: .NET CodeDOM Demystified - the Agenda

    For everybody interested in attending my live MSDN Webcast tomorrow, here is the agenda: CodeDOM Introduction Assembly compilation Source code generation Source code parsing Advanced concepts Template based source code generation On-the-fly proxy generation I think...
  • Blog Post: Web Services Quiz: Issue 6 - the Answer

    The answer to Issue 6 is maybe a bit surprising. One of the keys for successfully answering the quiz lies in the understanding of XML schema types . In the given example, xsd:integer has been applied to the message’s elements. It’s important to understand, that xsd:integer represents...
  • Blog Post: Web Services Quiz: Issue 6

    Given the following schema, how will your corresponding CLR types look like? As always, answer and explanation will follow… < xsd:schema targetNamespace ="http://beatsch/issue6/types" xmlns : tns ="http://beatsch/issue6/types" xmlns : xsd ="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">...
  • Blog Post: How to make it better

    This post is part of Issue 5’s answer The previous post demonstrated that we have to care about the messages we pass around. At the end, it’s always about the process of defining contracts. Let’s think about the way we’re defining the following contracts: A private...
  • Blog Post: How to improve the messaging experience

    This post is part of Issue 5’s answer Messaging means that you really care about messages. But looking at our example, do we really care about them? You might say yes, because we define a CLR message that acts as the argument type for our [WebMethod]. But do we really care about the message...
  • Blog Post: How to define the XPath expression

    This post is part of Issue 5’s answer As a result of step 1 (How to define a <MessagePredicate>) we go the following template for our <MessagePredicate> < wsp:MessagePredicate wsp : Usage ="wsp:Required"> wsp:GetBody(.)/ here/goes/my/path > 4 </ wsp:MessagePredicate...
  • Blog Post: How to define a MessagePredicate

    This post is part of Issue 5’s answer I’ve highlighted the relevant artifacts in the following excerpt of the WS-PolicyAssertions spec: The contents of the <MessagePredicate> element is an XPath 1.0 expression. The XPath expression is evaluated against the...
  • Blog Post: Web Services Quiz: Issue 5 - the Answer

    The answer to Issue 5 is the following: < wsp:MessagePredicate wsp : Usage ="wsp:Required" xmlns : it ="uri:isssue5/types" xmlns : iw ="uri:isssue5/wsdl"> wsp:GetBody(.)/ iw:reqMsg/it:something > 4 </ wsp:MessagePredicate > Since this quiz involves different...
  • Blog Post: Writing Secure Code: On the Road again ...

    Together with Mario , I’m going to deliver the following content throughout Austria : Writing Secure Code: Essential Security Technologies (part 1) Writing Secure Code: Essential Security Technologies (part 2) Secure Application Architecture .NET Framework Security Curious...
  • Blog Post: Web Services Quiz: Issue 5

    I’ve found the following thoughts quite interesting… Prolog: The WS-Policy framework allows you to make statements about your Web Services such as their preferences, requirements or capabilities. Since policies are part of the messaging infrastructure, they can be applied to services...
  • Blog Post: Web Services Quiz: Issue 4 - the Answer

    The answer to quiz 4 is quite surprising: < s:complexType name ="AddRequestMsg"> < s:sequence > < s:element minOccurs ="1" maxOccurs ="1" name ="a" type ="s:int" /> < s:element minOccurs ="1" maxOccurs ="1" name ="b" type ="s:int" /> </ s:sequence > ...
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