benjamin perkins

List<Solution> solutions = changes.Where(c => c.CeterisParibus != true)

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  • Blog Post: Azure Website Hosting Plans (WHP)

    There is a great overview of Web Hosting Plans here , so this blog is not about what they are but 2 experiences I have had with them. Why do I think they exist now How I recently cleaned up my subscription with them For someone who has been using Azure Websites for some time...
  • Blog Post: Using LogParser to analyze the EVENTLOG.XML, Azure Websites

    If you have an active Azure Web Site and you experience problems or want to do some checks on what might the problem, there is a file called EVENTLOG.XML which contain exceptions and information that may be helpful. The file is located in the /LogFiles directory on your Azure Web Site. Figure 1 illustrates...
  • Blog Post: Updating the configuration for the web site failed, Azure Websites

    I was making a lot of changes to one of my Azure Websites the other day and received the messages within the Azure Management Console similar to those shown in Figure 1 and 2. Figure 1, Updating the configuration for web site failed Figure 2, The deployment history is unavailable when the...
  • Blog Post: The webpage cannot be found (404) when accessing a file on Azure Websites

    404 status codes can be a little misleading. I wrote another article here about 404’s here from an on premise IIS perspective, but in principle the information applies. The fact about 404’s is that there are many sub status codes lined to the 404 status code. Most people believe that the...
  • Blog Post: Using Traffic Manager as a FAILOVER solution for Azure Web Sites

    I wanted to share an experience I had when using the Microsoft Azure Traffic Manager with 2 Microsoft Azure Web Sites. If you are not clear on what the Traffic Manager does, read my other post here . Simply, it is a way to balance load across multiple identical instances of an application so that requests...
  • Blog Post: Using Traffic Manager with Microsoft Azure Web Site

    One of the most challenging aspects of creating a disaster recovery environment was having a quick failover to a website that exists in another datacenter. These failover instances usually contained stale code, the hardware for the environment was expensive and rarely, if ever utilized and when we tried...
  • Blog Post: How to store and access your IIS Logs on Windows Azure Web Site

    Being part of the IIS support team I have memorized the structure of an IIS log file and can see oddities almost instantly. Therefore, one of the things I want to look at when troubleshooting any Windows Azure Web Site (WAWS) issue are the logs. As Windows Azure Web Sites is relatively new when I work...
  • Blog Post: HTTPS only on Windows Azure Web Sites

    If you are looking for a resource that describes installing an SSL certificate on a Windows Azure Web Site, check here . There are multiple modes currently supported on the Windows Azure Web Site platform: SNI base SSL – This is a new feature in IIS 8+ (SNI) that extends the ability for...
  • Blog Post: Scaling your Windows Azure Web Site

    Having spent many years supporting web sites running on IIS one of the most challenging aspects was managing load. I was able to plan for near-term growth by tracking the CPU, Memory, total number of requests, etc… over time and once the utilization of these elements exceeded my threshold for...
  • Blog Post: Download Windows Azure Web Site log files from Visual Studio

    I wrote an article about the ability to enable Web Server Logging, Detailed Error Message, Failed Request Tracing and Application Logging here . In that article I discussed that you can download the logs using an FTP tool like FIlezilla. You can also download the log files from within Visual Studio by...
  • Blog Post: 404 File or directory not found when mapping custom domain to a Windows Azure Web Site, Server Error

    If you are receiving a 404 error while accessing your custom domain, as shown in Figure 1, then you are most likely missing the link between your Windows Azure Web Site configuration and your custom domain. Before we move to the solution, you might want to also check these descriptions of...
  • Blog Post: Enable logging on your Windows Azure Web Site from Visual Studio

    With the release of Windows Azure SDK 2.0, you can enable the logging from within Visual Studio. I wrote another article which discussed how to enable Failed Request Tracing while logged into the Windows Azure Management console. You can review that article here . After installing the SDK, open Visual...
  • Blog Post: Enabling Failed Request Logging on a Windows Azure Web Site

    Using Failed Request Tracing is a very useful tool for troubleshooting performance issue on your Windows Azure Web Site and for any website running on IIS. Windows Azure Web Sites does not currently support a remote desktop connection and therefore the configuration of the Failed Request Tracing feature...
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