blogs.msdn.com/brianjo

Brian Johnson's Startup Developer Blog

January, 2004

Posts
  • blogs.msdn.com/brianjo

    ISA Server 2004 Beta Available

    • 1 Comments
    The ISA Server 2004 beta is available for download from Microsoft.com. This is a good chance to take a look at the changes in the product. Here's the blurb from the page.
    Microsoft Internet Security and Acceleration (ISA) Server 2004 is the advanced application layer firewall, VPN, and Web cache solution that enables customers to easily maximize existing IT investments by improving network security and performance. ISA Server 2004 Beta allows you to preview the upcoming functionality in this upcoming version.
    You can also check out the new screen shots on the page. It's looking good.

  • blogs.msdn.com/brianjo

    What You Should Know About the Mydoom Worm

    • 0 Comments
    We've published a Virus Alert for the Mydoom Worm:
    Why We Are Issuing This Alert

    W32/Mydoom@MM spreads through e-mail. This worm can disguise the sender's address, a tactic known as spoofing, and may generate e-mails that appear to have been sent by Microsoft. Many of the addresses Mydoom uses are valid addresses that are being spoofed for malicious purposes.

    Technical information about the virus is available from antivirus vendors participating in the Microsoft Virus Information Alliance (VIA). The Mydoom worm is also known by the names Novarg, Shimg, and Mimail.R.

    If you ever receive a questionable e-mail message that contains an attachment, do not open the attachment. If you cannot confirm with the sender that the message is valid and that the attachment is safe, delete the message immediately. If you receive a questionable message that purports to be from Microsoft, you should be aware that Microsoft never distributes software through e-mail.
    Bottom line... use caution when opening e-mail attachements. Please let your friends and family know about the dangers associated with doing this. Let's keep everybody as safe as we can.
  • blogs.msdn.com/brianjo

    MSN Toolbar Beta

    • 2 Comments
    This is interesting. An MSN Search toolbar. I'll take it for a spin and see how it compares. I've been telling people that I'm using MSN Search a lot because I use the MSN Explorer browser and that the search results have been good. This toolbar even adds a pop-up guard to IE.

  • blogs.msdn.com/brianjo

    Correcting a SPOT Review

    • 0 Comments
    I was reading a recent SPOT review and the following caught my eye:
    For example, you have to pay Microsoft a monthly fee for the wireless service, either $10 a month or $60 a year up front, plus a $60 activation fee. Yes, you read that right: you've lived to see the day when people pay a monthly fee for their watches.

    (Emphasis mine) Here’s the link to the article:
    http://www.contracostatimes.com/mld/cctimes/7792940.htm

    I've seen this reported twice. I didn't see anything about an activation fee when I signed up so I checked internally. Here's the information I got:

    There are two service options:
    $9.95 per month with the first month free OR
    $59 per year
    Neither has any additional activation fee.

    I thought this would be helpful for anyone considering a SPOT device, but who might be put off by the reported pricing. I'm told that we're working with the press to correct this error.
  • blogs.msdn.com/brianjo

    Data Access and Storage Developer Center is Live

    • 0 Comments
    Congratulations to Christa! The MSDN Data Access and Storage Developer center is now up and running. This is a really good thing. The center is easy to find at http://msdn.microsoft.com/data. Just remember /data part and you're all set.

  • blogs.msdn.com/brianjo

    SPOT Watch Update

    • 2 Comments

    After a week with the SPOT, I must say that I'm really enjoying this device. What's really interesting about it is how unobtrusive it is. I've charged it once, but the battery hasn't gone under 75%. I don't spend much time monkeying with the thing... I've got my workstation machine set to fire out updates when my calendar changes, and it just works. As I go from meeting to meeting, I glance down at the watch to see what room I need to go to and that's it. If I'm going outside I look down to see the temperature and weather. And finally, I get to see stock prices and news. It's been a very good user experience, and it's taking no effort on my part. Maybe this is an experiment in the future of computing.  

    One funny thing happened this week. I was in meeting, minding my own business with my watch in glance mode. The MSFT stock price popped up and somebody grabbed my wrist to see what it said. I wasn't really ready for that, but I found it amusing.

  • blogs.msdn.com/brianjo

    Total Recall

    • 0 Comments

    Coincidence? I think not. My wife and I talked about watching Total Recall tonight. (I love that movie.) I bought it three months ago and I haven't cracked the wrapper yet. And then to see Arnold at JPL.... Weird. There's got to be some sort of funny angle to this, like I took a virtual holiday and ended up as governor. I would have put up with anything for a little more coverage, but even this doesn't seem to get the event more attention than the end of Sex and the City.

     

  • blogs.msdn.com/brianjo

    Opportunity Lands!

    • 1 Comments
    Just as I was about to post my last entry I looked up at the TV to see the CNN coverage of the Opportunity lander.  Great stuff. I still wish the coverage was better. Fifteen minutes and we're off to something else. Maybe we'll see more when the pictures start to show up.
  • blogs.msdn.com/brianjo

    54 Commandments of COM Object Model Design.

    • 0 Comments

    Craig shares a list of 54 COM object model design commandments:

    I thought I would share the list of rules that we follow when developing the Visual Studio COM object model. There are a few blemishes in our object model, mostly caused by legacy code in our code base, where we do not follow these rules, but we try to follow them as close as possible. These rules may be applicable to your COM object model (with some changes, such as your root object probably will not be called DTE), and some are applicable to .NET development (translate HRESULTs to exceptions). I encourage you to make a list of rules such as this when you design an object model, it makes defining the objects much easier and consistent.

    This provides some fascinating insight into the design of the Visual Studio COM object model. Check it out.

  • blogs.msdn.com/brianjo

    SQL Blog to Watch

    • 0 Comments

    Christa Carpentiere is the new MSDN Content Strategist for the upcoming Data Access and Storage Developer Center. She has a blog on sqlunkies.com.  

Page 2 of 6 (51 items) 12345»