In the past couple of weeks I’ve posted some articles on how to tune a Windows system for SQL Server. Microsoft SQL Server DBA’s are a bit different than a DBA on, say, a mainframe, because we also have to know the operating system we run on pretty well. In fact, most of the DBA’s I work with can install and manage a Windows server quite well, thank you.

But when a new version of the Operating System comes out at the same time that the new version of SQL Server comes out, I have to prioritize my learning. I spend most of the time in the new database server, but then I need to come up to speed quickly on the operating system.

Among the various systems of learning, I normally gravitate to examples, and then reading. I don’t use a lot of in-classroom learning, although I do teach quite often. Anyway, this is the very kind of book I like to use: http://www.informit.com/store/product.aspx?isbn=067233075X

It’s a “cookbook” style work, meaning that you find the heading you want to learn about and then work through the examples and steps they mention. This helped me a great deal, especially with Windows Server Core. No, SQL Server doesn’t run on Core, but I was using it for something else, and I had actually given up on it before I got this book. Core is not easy to learn, even for an old UNIX hound like me! But the book covers that quite nicely.

It’s small, pretty cheap, and I found it useful.