I found an interesting post recently that discusses some detailed feedback from soldiers on the ground in Afghanistan and Iraq.  The reports are interesting from a tactical perspective, if you are into that kind of thing:

“EQUIPMENT WISE, OUR GREATEST SHORTCOMINGS WERE OPTICS AND ORGANIC OR DIRECT SUPPORT LONG RANGE WEAPONS. AFTER THE INITIAL FIGHT ALL OUR TARGETS WERE AT A MINIMUM OF 15OOM ALL THE WAY OUT TO AS FAR AS YOU COULD SEE. OUR 60 AND 81'S ACCOUNTED FOR MOST OF THE KILLS.”

In addition, other sections of the feedback shed some light on the many and varied activities of our troops, that you don’t necessarily see in the quick-blurb four paragraphs on the latest ambush that you see in the daily paper.  I particularly liked this comment:

“Each day commanders faced situations for which they had no reference on how to make a correct choice. The inability to act or decide would paralyze a unit. Leaders must act and then learn. LTC Dolan said one of the best decisions he made was his choice for chief of police. Both commanders acted before guidance was issued from higher. Sometimes their actions were in compliance with higher guidance, sometimes they weren’t. In the cases when their actions were not in compliance, each commander was faced with how to resolve the difference.”

Wow, join the Army and pick the chief of police for a town in a foreign country.  It’s not just a job, it’s an adventure!

(I don’t mean that sarcastically – it really must be something to have a job that asks for that kind of decision-making.)