March, 2011

  • Canadian Solution Developers' Blog

    Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010: Part 10 of 13 - Testing in the Lab

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    VS-One-on-One---Bridging-The-Gap_thu[1]_thumb[4]

    In this post, we’re continuing our One on One with Visual Studio conversation from March 13 with Canadian MVPs Etienne Tremblay and Vincent Grondin, Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010. If you’ve just joined us, the conversation builds on the previous posts, so check those out (links below) and then join us back here. If you’re re-joining us, welcome back!

    Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010

    Introduction
    Part 1 of 13 – Migrating VSS to TFS
    Part 2 of 13 – Automating the Build
    Part 3 of 13 – Where’s Our Backlog?
    Part 4 of 13 – Adding a Tester to the Team
    Part 5 of 13 – Tester at Work
    Part 6 of 13 – Bridging the Gap
    Part 7 of 13 – Stop, We Have a Problem!
    Part 8 of 13 – Let’s Get Back On Track
    Part 9 of 13 – Multi-Environment Testing
    Part 10 of 13 – Testing in the Lab (This Post)

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent deploy the web service to the lab environment and then run tests against it to ensure that everything is working. During the Q&A session, Etienne answers a very important question: “We have test plan, test suite, work items, and builds. How do they all tie together?” He explains:

    • The plan is the overarching container that holds test suites that are composed of test cases.
    • Each suite is associated with a requirement – all test cases within the test suite are used to test the one requirement to which the suite is assigned.
    • The build is assigned to the plan – the build is created in order to test everything in the test plan. With each new build, all of the test suites would be rerun to ensure that they all still work.

    With that, Etienne and Vincent, back to you.

    For more information on the topics covered in this session, check out the following resources:

    Remember, this conversation is bidirectional. Share your comments and feedback on our Ignite Your Coding LinkedIn discussion. Etienne, Vincent, and I will be monitoring the discussion and will be happy to hear from you.

  • Canadian Solution Developers' Blog

    Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010: Part 9 of 13 - Multi-Environment Testing

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    VS-One-on-One---Bridging-The-Gap_thu[1]

    In this post, we’re continuing our One on One with Visual Studio conversation from March 13 with Canadian MVPs Etienne Tremblay and Vincent Grondin, Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010. If you’ve just joined us, the conversation builds on the previous posts, so check those out (links below) and then join us back here. If you’re re-joining us, welcome back!

    Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010

    Introduction
    Part 1 of 13 – Migrating VSS to TFS
    Part 2 of 13 – Automating the Build
    Part 3 of 13 – Where’s Our Backlog?
    Part 4 of 13 – Adding a Tester to the Team
    Part 5 of 13 – Tester at Work
    Part 6 of 13 – Bridging the Gap
    Part 7 of 13 – Stop, We Have a Problem!
    Part 8 of 13 – Let’s Get Back On Track
    Part 9 of 13 – Multi-Environment Testing (This Post)

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent introduce us to Lab Management, a new feature of Visual Studio that lets you manage a collection of virtual machines, templates, and virtual environments where you can develop, test, or run your application. Etienne demonstrates how to create a new lab environment and start it in order to test applications.

    With that, Etienne and Vincent, back to you.

    For more information on the topics covered in this session, check out the following resources:

    Remember, this conversation is bidirectional. Share your comments and feedback on our Ignite Your Coding LinkedIn discussion. Etienne, Vincent, and I will be monitoring the discussion and will be happy to hear from you.

  • Canadian Solution Developers' Blog

    Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010: Part 8 of 13 - Let’s Get Back On Track

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    VS-One-on-One---Bridging-The-Gap_thu_thumb[2]

    In this post, we’re continuing our One on One with Visual Studio conversation from March 13 with Canadian MVPs Etienne Tremblay and Vincent Grondin, Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010. If you’ve just joined us, the conversation builds on the previous posts, so check those out (links below) and then join us back here. If you’re re-joining us, welcome back!

    Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010

    Introduction
    Part 1 of 13 – Migrating VSS to TFS
    Part 2 of 13 – Automating the Build
    Part 3 of 13 – Where’s Our Backlog?
    Part 4 of 13 – Adding a Tester to the Team
    Part 5 of 13 – Tester at Work
    Part 6 of 13 – Bridging the Gap
    Part 7 of 13 – Stop, We Have a Problem!
    Part 8 of 13 – Let’s Get Back On Track

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Vincent updates the code to fix the production bug. Once fixed, he shows us how he associates the changes with the bug and commits the changes. Etienne then creates and runs a test case to prove that the bug has been resolved. Vincent highlights an important point – the new feature that he added is not in the build that Etienne is testing. Why? Etienne is testing the build from the code in the branch that was created for the production release (Vincent’s feature was not part of the production release). Etienne then merges the release branch with main branch to bring the bug fix in with the new features developed after the production release.

    With that, Etienne and Vincent, back to you.

    For more information on the topics covered in this session, check out the following resources:

    Remember, this conversation is bidirectional. Share your comments and feedback on our Ignite Your Coding LinkedIn discussion. Etienne, Vincent, and I will be monitoring the discussion and will be happy to hear from you.

  • Canadian Solution Developers' Blog

    Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010: Part 7 of 13 - Stop, We Have A Problem!

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    VS-One-on-One---Bridging-The-Gap_thu

    In this post, we’re continuing our One on One with Visual Studio conversation from March 13 with Canadian MVPs Etienne Tremblay and Vincent Grondin, Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010. If you’ve just joined us, the conversation builds on the previous posts, so check those out (links below) and then join us back here. If you’re re-joining us, welcome back!

    Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010

    Introduction
    Part 1 of 13 – Migrating VSS to TFS
    Part 2 of 13 – Automating the Build
    Part 3 of 13 – Where’s Our Backlog?
    Part 4 of 13 – Adding a Tester to the Team
    Part 5 of 13 – Tester at Work
    Part 6 of 13 – Bridging the Gap
    Part 7 of 13 – Stop, We Have a Problem! (This Post)

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent work through a situation that we are all very familiar with – a bug in production code! But how do we deal with defects in code after modifications have been made in support of new features? Branch the code. Etienne and Vincent explore the concept of branching and then show us how to branch code in a project.

    With that, Etienne and Vincent, back to you.

    For more information on the topics covered in this session, check out the following resources:

    Remember, this conversation is bidirectional. Share your comments and feedback on our Ignite Your Coding LinkedIn discussion. Etienne, Vincent, and I will be monitoring the discussion and will be happy to hear from you.

  • Canadian Solution Developers' Blog

    AzureFest: Cloud Development Crash Course

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    AzureFest

    Finding the time to learn about the Cloud and how to extend your skills to build solutions for the Cloud can be a challenge when your schedule is defined by application build, test, and deployment milestones. With this type of schedule, chances are you find learning new concepts in one condensed sprint much easier than trying to squeeze some learning into an hour here and an hour, between your other tasks. If that’s the case for you, you’ll want to check out AzureFest, a hands-on educational event designed by Canada’s own MVPs Cory Fowler (@SyntaxC4) and Barry Gervin (@bgervin) from ObjectSharp. At AzureFest, you’ll see how developing and deploying applications to Windows Azure is fast and easy, leveraging the skills you already have (.NET, Java, PHP, or Ruby) and the tools you already know (Visual Studio, Eclipse, etc.).

    AzureFest sessions are delivered with examples using .NET and Visual Studio, but the concepts are the same regardless of the language and tools. You’ll learn everything to you need to know to get up and running with Windows Azure quickly including:

    • Overview of Cloud Computing and Windows Azure
    • Setting up the Windows Azure SDK and Windows Azure Tools for Visual Studio
    • Setting up your Windows Azure account
    • Migrating a traditional on-premise ASP.NET MVC application to the Cloud
    • Deploying solutions to Windows Azure

    AzureFest is a hands-on event. This means that you’ll be following along in your own development environment and actually deploying your solution during the event. In order to get the most out of the experience, you’ll need to bring a laptop with you that is running Windows Vista SP1 or Windows 7 and has the Windows Azure Tools for Visual Studio installed.

    You’ll also need to bring a credit card. Windows Azure activations require a credit card even for the trial period, but don’t worry, nothing will be charged to your credit card as the last part of the event shows you how to take down all of your Windows Azure instances.

    We’re taking AzureFest across Canada, and will be coming to a city near you. Check out the listings below to get all the information you need about each of the cities. Don’t see a city that’s near you? Keep checking back as we will be adding more cities and dates as we confirm them. If you’d like to help organize an AzureFest in your city or at your user group, please contact me via email, Twitter, or LinkedIn.

    Where and When

    Downtown Toronto
    Microsoft Canada
    Ernst & Young Tower
    222 Bay Street, 12th floor
    Wednesday, March 30, 2011 6:00PM – 9;00PM
    Click here to register

    Presenters: Cory Fowler (@SyntaxC4), Barry Gervin (@bgervin)

    Mississauga
    Microsoft Canada
    1950 Meadowvale Boulevard
    Thursday, March 31, 2011 6:00PM - 9:00PM 
    Click here to register

    Presenters: Cory Fowler (@SyntaxC4), Barry Gervin (@bgervin)

    Vancouver
    BCIT, Burnaby Campus
    3700 Willingdon Avenue
    Tuesday, April 5, 2011
    6:00PM – 9:00PM
    Click here to register

    Presenters: Jonathan Rozenblit (@jrozenblit)

    Ottawa
    Algonquin College Campus
    1385 Woodroffe Avenue, Ottawa
    Saturday, April 16, 2011 12:45PM – 1:30PM
    Click here to register

    Presenters: Christian Beauclair (@cbeauclair)

    Calgary
    University of Calgary, Rm 121 ICT Building
    2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, AB
    Saturday, April 30, 2011 9:00 AM – 5:00 PM
    Click here to register

    Presenters: Michael Diehl (@MikeDiehl_Wpg) and Tyler Doerksen (@Tyler_gd)
    Moncton
    Greater Moncton Chamber of Commerce Board Room – First Floor
    1273 Main Street, Suite 200, Moncton, NB
    Friday, May 6, 2011 6:00 PM - 10:00 PM
    Click here to register

    Presenters: Cory Fowler (@SyntaxC4)

    Fredericton
    UNB Campus
    Room 317, ITC
    Saturday, May 7, 2011 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM
    Click here to register

    Presenters: Cory Fowler (@SyntaxC4)

    Halifax
    The Hub
    1673 Barrington St., 2nd Floor, Halifax, NS
    Sunday, May 8, 2011 1:30PM – 4:30 PM
    Click here to register

    Presenters: Cory Fowler (@SyntaxC4)

    Quebec City
    l'École National d'Administration Publique (ENAP), salle 4114
    555, boul.Charest Est, Québec, QC
    Thursday, May 12, 2011 5:00 PM – 8:30 PM
    Click here to register

    Presenters: Frédéric Harper (@fharper)

    Montreal
    Microsoft Canada
    2000 McGill College, Montreal, QC
    Tuesday, May 17, 2011 6:00 PM – 9:00 PM
    Click here to register

    Presenters: Frédéric Harper (@fharper)
    Winnipeg
    Online Business Systems, Assiniboine Room, 2nd Floor
    200-115 Bannatyne Ave., Winnipeg, MB
    Thursday, May 19, 2011 5:30 PM – 9:00 PM
    Click here to register

    Presenters: John Bristowe (@jbristowe)
    Kitchener
    Holiday Inn - Kitchener
    30 Fairway Road South, Kitchener, ON
    Tuesday, May 31, 2011 8:30 AM – 12:00 PM
    Click here to register 

    Presenters: Jonathan Rozenblit (@jrozenblit)
    Virtual Lunch and Learn Series
    Online
    Part 1: Thursday, May 19, 2011 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EST, CST, MST, PST
    Part 2: Thursday, May 26, 2011 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EST, CST, MST, PST
    Part 3: Thursday, June 2, 2011 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM EST, CST, MST, PST
    Click here to register

    Presenters: Jonathan Rozenblit (@jrozenblit)

    Make sure you register early as space is limited. Make sure to find me when you’re are the event – it will be an opportunity for us to chat about what you’re working on, possible projects to move to the Cloud, and how I can help you grow your skills and career.

  • Canadian Solution Developers' Blog

    Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010: Part 6 of 13 - Bridging the Gap

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    VS-One-on-One---Bridging-The-Gap_thu[2]

    In this post, we’re continuing our One on One with Visual Studio conversation from March 13 with Canadian MVPs Etienne Tremblay and Vincent Grondin, Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010. If you’ve just joined us, the conversation builds on the previous posts, so check those out (links below) and then join us back here. If you’re re-joining us, welcome back!

    Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010

    Introduction
    Part 1 of 13 – Migrating VSS to TFS
    Part 2 of 13 – Automating the Build
    Part 3 of 13 – Where’s Our Backlog?
    Part 4 of 13 – Adding a Tester to the Team
    Part 5 of 13 – Tester at Work
    Part 6 of 13 – Bridging the Gap (This Post)

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent show how the developer uses the information gathered by the tester within Visual Studio to resolve a bug. Vincent explores the test results and shows us the output of the recording taken when Etienne, as a tester, was running his test. Remember the IntelliTrace test setting that was enabled? Vincent looks at the results of that IntelliTrace and debugs the code to find the exact line of code that caused the application to crash. Once he makes the required updates to the code, he checks in the code and associates the code check-in with the bug filed by Etienne in the previous session. Last but not least, he updates the bug status, which lets Etienne know that he has a new bug to test.

    Etienne looks up the recommended tests for the particular bug and reruns the test to ensure that the bug is, in fact, fixed. The first time he runs through the test manually. The second time, he uses Test Runner’s action playback capabilities to have Test Runner run through the test case, enter all the data, and capture the results, all on its own.

    With that, Etienne and Vincent, back to you.

    For more information on the topics covered in this session, check out the following resources:

    Remember, this conversation is bidirectional. Share your comments and feedback on our Ignite Your Coding LinkedIn discussion. Etienne, Vincent, and I will be monitoring the discussion and will be happy to hear from you.

  • Canadian Solution Developers' Blog

    Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010: Part 5 of 13 - Tester at Work

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    VS-One-on-One---Bridging-The-Gap_thu[1]

    In this post, we’re continuing our One on One with Visual Studio conversation from March 13 with Canadian MVPs Etienne Tremblay and Vincent Grondin, Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010. If you’ve just joined us, the conversation builds on the previous posts, so check those out (links below) and then join us back here. If you’re re-joining us, welcome back!

    Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010

    Introduction
    Part 1 of 13 – Migrating VSS to TFS
    Part 2 of 13 – Automating the Build
    Part 3 of 13 – Where’s Our Backlog?
    Part 4 of 13 – Adding a Tester to the Team
    Part 5 of 13 – Tester at Work (This Post)

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent explore the many different facets of manual testing. First, they introduce us to the different types of tests that can be run with Test Manager and walkthrough creating a test case that runs against the application. Once the test case is designed, Etienne and Vincent show us how to run the test case, record the actions for each step as the test case is being executed, and then explore the results of the test and the information Test Runner captures. All of that information is then used to create a new bug that is then filed for the developers. Etienne also highlights different settings that can be enabled or disabled for each test, including video recording and IntelliTrace.

    During the session, Etienne and Vincent highlight a few cool tips and ticks including:

    • Copying and pasting steps into the test case rather than typing them out
    • Shared steps to avoid having to re-enter the same steps in multiple test cases
    • Using the screen capture feature of Test Runner to include images with test results

    With that, Etienne and Vincent, back to you.

    For more information on the topics covered in this session, check out the following resources:

    Remember, this conversation is bidirectional. Share your comments and feedback on our Ignite Your Coding LinkedIn discussion. Etienne, Vincent, and I will be monitoring the discussion and will be happy to hear from you.

  • Canadian Solution Developers' Blog

    Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010: Part 4 of 13 - Adding a Tester to the Team

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    VS-One-on-One---Bridging-The-Gap_thu[3]

    In this post, we’re continuing our One on One with Visual Studio conversation from March 13 with Canadian MVPs Etienne Tremblay and Vincent Grondin, Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010. If you’ve just joined us, the conversation builds on the previous posts, so check those out (links below) and then join us back here. If you’re re-joining us, welcome back!

    Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010

    Introduction
    Part 1 of 13 – Migrating VSS to TFS
    Part 2 of 13 – Automating the Build
    Part 3 of 13 – Where’s Our Backlog?
    Part 4 of 13 – Adding a Tester to the Team (This Post)

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent talk about the differences between white-box and black-box testing of applications. They switch hats and put on their “tester” hats, introducing us to a new addition to Visual Studio – Test Manager.  Etienne demonstrates how to create a new test plan and add test cases to it. But how do you add a test case? Don’t worry, Etienne and Vincent cover that in the next session of our conversation.

    With that, Etienne and Vincent, back to you.

    Etienne and Vincent, where can we get more information on the items that you discussed in this session?

    Remember, this conversation is bidirectional. Share your comments and feedback on our Ignite Your Coding LinkedIn discussion. Etienne, Vincent, and I will be monitoring the discussion and will be happy to hear from you.

  • Canadian Solution Developers' Blog

    Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010: Part 3 of 12 - Where’s Our Backlog?

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    VS-One-on-One---Bridging-The-Gap_thu[2][1]_thumb[6]

    In this post, we’re continuing our One on One with Visual Studio conversation from March 13 with Canadian MVPs Etienne Tremblay and Vincent Grondin, Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010. If you’ve just joined us, the conversation builds on the previous posts, so check those out (links below) and then join us back here. If you’re re-joining us, welcome back!

    Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010

    Introduction
    Part 1 of 13 – Migrating VSS to TFS
    Part 2 of 13 – Automating the Build
    Part 3 of 13 – Where’s Our Backlog? (This post)

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent show us the basics of a Scrum-based backlog and how to connect and migrate a backlog to Team Foundation Server from Excel. They also introduce us to DemoApp and the bug that’s in the code. The bug will be worked on in later sessions of the conversation. During the Q&A session, Etienne also talks about and defines terms used in different methodologies, integration between Team Foundation Server and Project, and Team Foundation Server’s API.

    With that, Etienne and Vincent, back to you.

    Etienne and Vincent, where can we get more information on the items that you discussed in this session?

    Remember, this conversation is bidirectional. Share your comments and feedback on our Ignite Your Coding LinkedIn discussion. Etienne, Vincent, and I will be monitoring the discussion and will be happy to hear from you.

  • Canadian Solution Developers' Blog

    Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010: Part 2 of 13 - Automating the Build

    • 3 Comments

     

    VS-One-on-One---Bridging-The-Gap_thu[2][1]

    In this post, we’re continuing our One on One with Visual Studio conversation from March 13 with Canadian MVPs Etienne Tremblay and Vincent Grondin, Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010. If you’ve just joined us, the conversation builds on the previous posts, so check those out (links below) and then join us back here. If you’re re-joining us, welcome back!

    Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010

    Introduction
    Part 1 of 13 – Migrating VSS to TFS
    Part 2 of 13 – Automating the Build (this post) 

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent talk to us about what is a build, types of builds you can configure in Team Foundation Server, and the advantages of each. They also walkthrough configuring a build, explaining each of the steps required in enabling automated unit tests, sharing of source and symbol files, and retention of builds. Once the build is done, they show us how to read the progress report and understand the information it displays.

    With that, Etienne and Vincent, back to you.

    Etienne and Vincent, where can we get more information on the items that you discussed in this session?

    Remember, this conversation is bidirectional. Share your comments and feedback on our Ignite Your Coding LinkedIn discussion. Etienne, Vincent, and I will be monitoring the discussion and will be happy to hear from you.

  • Canadian Solution Developers' Blog

    Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010: Part 1 of 13 - Migrating VSS to TFS

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    VS One on One - Bridging The Gap_thumb[2]

    In this post, we’re continuing our One on One with Visual Studio conversation from March 13 with Canadian MVPs Etienne Tremblay and Vincent Grondin, Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010. If you’ve just joined us, the conversation builds on the previous post, so check it out and then join us back here. If you’re re-joining us, welcome back!

    In this session of our conversation, Bridging The Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010, Etienne and Vincent give us a brief introduction to Team Foundation Server, it’s tools, and how it integrates with the tools in your environment that you’re already familiar with such as Visual Studio, Office, and SharePoint. They’ll also show us how migration from an existing Visual SourceSafe repository to Team Foundation Server can be automated so that you don’t have to migrate everything by hand.

    With that, Etienne and Vincent, we’re all yours.

    Etienne and Vincent, where can we get more information on the items that you discussed in this session?

    Remember, this conversation is bidirectional. Share your comments and feedback on our Ignite Your Coding LinkedIn discussion. Etienne, Vincent, and I will be monitoring the discussion and will be happy to hear from you.

  • Canadian Solution Developers' Blog

    Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010

    • 2 Comments

     

    VS One on One - Bridging The Gap

    In this first One on One with Visual Studio conversation, we’re joined by two of Canada’s experts on Visual Studio and ALM (application lifecycle management). Etienne Tremblay and Vincent Grondin will be talking to us about how Visual Studio’s extensive integrated tools make you more effective and efficient, allowing you to better collaborate with the rest of your project team. They’ll show you how testing tools like MS Test, IntelliTrace, and Coded UI make it easier for you to test – and test often – while not increasing your workload; about Team Foundation Server’s work item management and how it facilitates better communication between you, testers, project managers, and development managers; Team Foundation Server’s version control, lab management, and team build tools and how they can automate many of the manual tasks that you’re required to do today; and lastly, about Visual Studio Test Professional’s Test Manager and Test Runner so that you can do your part in reducing testing efforts and as a result, deliver to market faster.

    Before we get started, a question to Etienne and Vincent. Etienne, Vincent, what inspired you to have this conversation with developers and testers?

    We’ve been toying with the idea of creating a video series of interesting tips and tricks for TFS and VS for quite a while but time always seems to prevent us from doing it. Back in November 2010, Vincent Grondin, Mario Cardinal, Mathieu Szablowski, and I did a full day session at our local user group in Montreal about how developers and testers could be good friends with all the new VS 2010 tooling.  Jean-René Roy was in attendance and he liked it so much (so did the attendees) that he approached Vincent and I to redo it in Ottawa. He said that he would try and see if he could get a crew to record it! Well it was in the cards because he did get a real professional crew to film us while we were re-enacting our play (improved from the first showing) and that’s we’re going to take a look at here. 

    We wanted to make a more “team oriented” presentation right from the beginning, we didn’t want to do yet another PowerPoint drone session for 8 hours. We wanted the audience (and now you) to feel like they (and you) were one of us and could relate to the problems we were facing and trying to resolve with the tools. We came up with the idea of making it a technical play. We actually talk to each other and the audience “spies” on us. It worked out great. Most people really enjoyed the format and asked us to do it again for other subjects.  We won’t lie to you, it was a lot of work – more than 70 hours went into preparing and rehearsing in order to deliver the final product. 

    What do you hope that we’ll take away from this conversation?

    There is a lot of information on the tools available on MSDN but it’s sometimes hard to find or make sense of in the context of real projects.  This conversation is an intro to this material in the real world (as much as it can be) and will provide you a good starting point on the various technologies and tools.  At the end, you can then go off to MSDN and find deeper information and see if the tooling works for you and your team.

    We both hope you enjoy it.

    Thank you Etienne and Vincent. Our conversation will be broken down in to sessions of 20-40 minutes to allow you to work it into your busy schedules. I’d recommend that you go in order as each segment builds on the previous.

    Before getting into the sessions, in this introductory video, Etienne and Vincent introduce themselves and set the stage for the rest of the conversation. Take a look.

    Etienne and Vincent, on behalf of myself and the developers in Canada, thank you for having this conversation with us and for all the effort you put into helping us understand what’s possible.

    Remember, this conversation is bidirectional. Share your comments and feedback on our Ignite Your Coding LinkedIn discussion. Etienne, Vincent, and I will be monitoring the discussion and will be happy to hear from you.

    About Etienne Tremblay

    etiennetremblay

    Etienne Tremblay is an Associate Director in charge of the Microsoft technologies center at DMR-Fujitsu in Montreal. He has over 20 years of experience in the IT industry and he specialized in Microsoft technologies in the last 12 years, specifically in managing the development process, he also has expertise in the mining and manufacturing industries. He has spoken at DevTeach since 2005, is a member of the Microsoft Team System Advisory Council and a Microsoft ALM MVP. You can reach him at bridging.the.gap@live.com

    Additional links: Etienne’s blog, Microsoft MVP Profile, Email

    About Vincent Grondin

    VincentGrondin

    Vincent Grondin has over 12 years of experience in the software development field and has been using .NET in enterprise projects for more than 8 years now. He was involved in many enterprise projects for large corporations like Desjardins, Domtar, Cascades and Alcoa but he was also part of a few projects for various government branches. He likes to learn new technologies related to .NET, use the new tools that are designed for .NET and he also loves to share it all with his peers. Yes, he’s a confessed .NET addict and currently works at DMR-Fujitsu as a Senior .NET Consultant.

    Additional links: Vincent’s blog, Microsoft MVP Profile, Email

    The Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010 was graciously sponsored by:

    logo-deveach-Large
  • Canadian Solution Developers' Blog

    One on Ones With Visual Studio

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    Visual Studio One on OneAs a developer who develops solutions on the Microsoft platform, you’re probably looking at the title of this post, One on Ones with Visual Studio, and are thinking “why do I need a one on one with Visual Studio?”. The answer is simple – like with your manager, a one on one is a session where two people (in this case one person and awesome software) to sit down, and through conversation, get a better idea of what’s new and how one can help the other. If you have these with your manager to keep each other informed, why should it be different between you and Visual Studio?

    You probably spend most of your day Visual Studio, but have you seen or used all of the features that Visual Studio has to offer? Let me challenge you to see how much of Visual Studio you’ve actually explored.

    If, as we have these one on ones, you’re familiar with all of the different aspects of Visual Studio that we talk about, then consider yourself a Visual Studio expert! Perhaps your next role could be a developer evangelist like myself and you can help have a conversation with others and show them what’s possible with Visual Studio. (Seriously – if you’re interested in helping out with these one-on-ones by doing a guest blog post, that would be really cool. Send me an email and we’ll get you on here.)

    So what are we going to be discussing in these one on ones? Well, it depends! When I was doing one on ones with my team members, we didn’t set an agenda.  Rather, we kept the conversation dynamic. However, we did make sure to keep to a consistent theme. The theme for these one on ones will be “features are cool but let’s also talk about how they make me more effective and successful.” As we have our conversations, we’re going to do just that. Rather than simply demonstrating features of Visual Studio, they’ll be centered on how those features impact you as a developer, how they make it easier for you to do what you do best, and how they’ll ultimately make you more successful.

    Next Steps

    With each one on one, I’ll update this post so that we’ll have one place to collect all of our conversations. Bookmark this post, subscribe to the RSS feed, or follow @cndsoldevs on Twitter so that you know when our next one on one is going to be and what we’re going to talk about.

    Remember, one on ones are not unidirectional. If there is something that you want to talk about or see come up in our conversations, please let me know. Send me an email, a DM on Twitter, or a message on LinkedIn.

    I’m really excited to start these conversations. I hope you are as well.

    Visual Studio: One on One Conversations

  • Canadian Solution Developers' Blog

    Get Started With The New Stuff

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    Get Started WIth the New Stuff

    So now that all of this new stuff for Visual Studio 2010 and Team Foundation Server 2010 is available (see Updates for Visual Studio 2010 and Team Foundation Server 2010 from yesterday), you may be scratching your head thinking where to get started. Fortunately, when it’s all broken down into what needs to be installed where, it’s not so bad.

    Before getting to that though, it’s important to highlight a few things:

    • Visual Studio 2010 Service Pack 1 includes all updates and patches that precede it as well as the Load Testing Feature Pack and the Visualization and Modeling Feature Pack as they are all designed to be installed on the Visual Studio client.
    • The Load Testing Feature Pack doesn’t include any new software. It’s a licensing change that enables unlimited virtual users if you have Visual Studio Ultimate with MSDN. All you need to do is download vUser license keys from your MSDN Subscriber Download Center.
    • The Project Server Feature Pack is a separate install because it is intended to be installed on your Project Server server. All the TFS (client and server) changes necessary to work with the new Project Server extensions are in SP1.

    Yesterday’s post didn’t include these additional goodies:

    With the important things covered, let’s get all the installations started. Brian Harry walks you through everything you have to do in his post Installing all the new stuff. Remember, if you only use Visual Studio 2010 (and not TFS and/or Project Server), you only need to look at the instructions for the client installation. If you’re running Team Foundation Server 2010, you’ll need to also look at the instructions for the TFS server, the TFS Build machine, and the TFS proxy.

    When You’re Done Installing

    Did the installations go smoothly? Did you encounter any issues that others should know about? Any gotchas that would be good to know before starting or after completing the installation? Share your installation experience in the discussion on the Ignite Your Coding LinkedIn group.

  • Canadian Solution Developers' Blog

    Updates for Visual Studio 2010 and TFS 2010

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    Updates for Visual Studio 2010

    If Visual Studio 2010 is your primary tool and you have an MSDN subscription, today was a great day! If you’re a Visual Studio 2010 developer but don’t have an MSDN subscription, Thursday, March 10 will be a great day for you! Why is today (or Thursday) a great day? Simple. Today (or Thursday) is the day when some really cool updates and enhancements are released for Visual Studio 2010 delivering on Microsoft’s commitment to us, developers, to provide innovative tools and high quality software solutions that meet our diverse needs and organizations.

    So what are these updates? Here’s the scoop:

    Visual Studio 2010 Service Pack 1

    In continuing the momentum focused on improving the developer experience, Visual Studio 2010 Service Pack 1 adds some of the most requested customer features to Visual Studio 2010, including better help support, IntelliTrace support for 64bit solutions and SharePoint, unit testing support on .NET 3.5, and a new performance wizard for Silverlight. Many fixes went in as well, of which a full list can be viewed in the Visual Studio and Team Foundation Server knowledge base articles. Additional information about SP1 compatibility, SP1 Readme, and other general information about SP1 can be found in the Visual Studio Dev Center.

    Next Steps for Visual Studio Service Pack 1

    If you have an MSDN subscription, you can download Visual Studio 2010 SP1 from your subscriber downloads.
    If you don’t have an MSDN subscription, no worries, it will just be a little bit longer of a wait. On Thursday March 10, you’ll be able to download Visual Studio 2010 SP1 from here.

    Visual Studio Load Test Feature Pack

    Whether developers in your organization are responsible for testing or there are dedicated testers, someone is testing your applications. Often, load and performance testing is done too late in the application lifecycle and fixing these types of defects at that time is costly. What’s the solution? Performance testing integrated into the application lifecycle at an early stage. With the Visual Studio 2010 Load Testing Feature Pack available for Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate with an MSDN license, you can now load test your mission-critical applications with as many virtual users as you deem appropriate to realistically simulate load. This will go a long way to ensuring that your solution will be able to cope with real-world demands and will behave in a predictable manner. Using these testing tools throughout the application lifecycle will ensure that you’ll be able to locate problems before they become too costly to fix.

    Next Steps for Getting Started with the Visual Studio Load Test Feature Pack

    1. Dive into more detailed information about the Load Test Feature Pack at the Visual Studio Team Test blog.
    2. Download Visual Studio 2010 SP1 from your MSDN Subscriber Download Center to enable the Load Test Feature Pack.

    If your organization has dedicated testers, share this post with them. You can also get them excited about the testing capabilities in Visual Studio 2010’s Test Professional. The best part is that if your organization has licenses for Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate with MSDN, you already have licenses for Test Professional.  Ask the licensing folks in your organization which version of Visual Studio 2010 you have.

    We’ll be covering testing and application lifecycle in an exciting upcoming series entitled “Bridging the Gap Between Developers and Testers Using Visual Studio 2010” with two Canadian ALM experts and MVPs, Etienne Tremblay and Vincent Grondin. Stay tuned for that in the next couple of weeks.

    Team Foundation Server and Project Server Integration Feature Pack

    If you’re already using Team Foundation Server in your organization, you know that it does some project management. You can even use Microsoft Project with Team Foundation Server. However, Team Foundation Server doesn’t have all of the functionality needed for project managers and the Project Management Office of an organization.  The Integration Feature Pack brings together the collaborative features of Team Foundation Server required by the software development teams with the project management features of Project Server 2010 required by the Project Management Office. If you use Team Foundation Server and the project managers with whom you work use Project Server, this is an absolute must for your organization – and it’s free Visual Studio 2010 Ultimate with MSDN users.

    Next Steps for Getting Started with the Integration Feature Pack

    1. Review the detailed breakdown of capabilities on Brian Harry’s blog.
    2. Review the MSDN Product documentation which includes scenarios as well as installation and configuration information.
    3. Download the Team Foundation Server/Project Server Integration Feature Pack from your MSDN Subscriber Download Center.
    4. Take a look at 2 available whitepapers: Project and Work Management with Project Server 2010 and Team Foundation Server 2010 (PDF, XPS) and Reconciling the Agile Team with Enterprise Project Management (PDF, XPS)
  • Canadian Solution Developers' Blog

    AlignIT 2011: Real World Strategies for Development Managers and Decision Makers

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    image

    The Situation

    Every organization pursues strategies to differentiate from competitors. Effective software integration and custom applications are essential in providing that competitive differentiation. As part of a development team, you’re always under pressure to reduce the time it takes to move from concept through design, coding, testing, to deployment, enabling the business to take advantage of an opportunity within a specific window.

    You or the development managers with whom you work are also challenged with ensuring that:

    • Overall productivity and quality of solutions is maintained at a high level
    • Costs are kept low throughout the application development cycle
    • Reporting on execution and communicating to stakeholders is done in a timely manner
    • Development/test results, decisions, and changes are tracked and adhere to the levels required by the various business and industry regulations
    • Software changes are made as part of a controlled process in order to minimize risk to the business

    Approaches to a Solution

    Efficiently coordinating all of these activities requires new, collaborative approaches to planning and executing development projects, bringing together the three key ingredients to achieving success – People, Process, and Tools. Individuals within your organization may already be looking at various approaches so let’s engage in a conversation on how we can help bring people, process, and tools together to address the challenges you face.

    Register for AlignIT

    Christian Beauclair (@cbeauclair), John Bristowe (@jbristowe), and I (@jrozenblit) will be hosting AlignIT in Montreal, Toronto, and Vancouver. We’ll be exploring these challenges and sharing what’s available to help you overcome them and be a successful development leader. Visit the AligntIT site, review the session details, and register to attend in person or via simulcast. Share this post with those individuals who you believe would benefit from the conversation and help them successfully implement change in your organization.

    AlignIT also has a track for infrastructure decision makers. If your responsibilities cross over to the infrastructure world, or you know someone who you think would benefit from the same type of conversation, head over to the AlignIT home page and have a look at the infrastructure sessions.

    Preparing for AlignIT

    For more information on topics that will be discussed AlignIT, stay tuned as we’ll be diving into topics such as new development experiences in Visual Studio and application lifecycle management as it bridges the gap between team members. We’ll also be sharing some real-world examples of how others are managing application development complexity in their companies to get you thinking about what you can do within your organization and how it may positively impact your development processes.

    Discuss Challenges and Share Insights

    What challenges are you facing in your organization? What’s being done, if anything, to address them? Share your thoughts in this Ignite Your Coding LinkedIn discussion.

  • Canadian Solution Developers' Blog

    Hello and Welcome!

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    Piecing Together Tech Solutions

    Hello there, Canadian Solution Developer!

    I’m Jonathan Rozenblit, your host and resident blogger here on the Canadian Solution Developer blog. I’d like to take this opportunity to welcome you to this new blog. In case we haven’t previously met (either in person or virtually), I’m a Developer Evangelist here at Microsoft Canada. Along with the rest of my team, it is our job to help you get answers to problems; share solutions and insights; and connect you with peers, community leaders, and experts. We’re here to support you and to be your advocates at Microsoft.  Success to us is ensuring you’re heard; and most importantly, helping you grow your skills in order to continue being successful in your career. 

    Through your feedback, you’ve told us that you’re looking to engage in conversations focused on technologies, platforms, and frameworks that are relevant to your projects and information that is relevant to your career development within your organization. We’re listening and are here to do just that! This blog was created as a result of your feedback and is here for you, the solution developer.

    As your resident bloggers, John Bristowe (@jbristowe) and I, Jonathan Rozenblit (@jrozenblit), will be bringing you the latest from around Microsoft, the development community in Canada, and the industry. We’ll cover technologies such as (but of course not limited to):

    • .NET (Windows Azure, WCF, WF, WPF, Enterprise Library, etc.)
    • SQL and Business Intelligence (SSDS, SSAS, SSIS, SSRS, SQL Azure, SQL Azure Reporting)
    • Enterprise Products (SharePoint Server, Dynamics CRM, etc.).

    Technology aside, we’ll also dive into topics such as:

    • Tooling
    • Software design patterns
    • Best practices
    • Requirements management
    • Testing and quality assurance
    • Project delivery and process optimization
    • Industry trends

    Through this blog, it’s our hope that we’ll be able to:

    • Help you solve problems by highlighting relevant information such as reference links and materials, technical posts, stories, and testimonials that will help.
    • Help you stay ahead by sharing insights, release schedules, customer scenarios, and case studies that will help you illustrate how the Microsoft platform can enable your solutions to meet and exceed the goals of your organization.
    • Help you influence others by providing you with the information you need to advocate Microsoft technologies, easily answering the question “Why Microsoft?” and describing the impact the technologies will have on your solutions.
    • Help you drive organizational success by illustrating holistic software development approaches and best practices that will help create efficient and effective development processes that will, in turn, drive organizational success.
    • Most importantly, help you grow your career and be successful by bringing you instructional materials, reference links, and highlighting training opportunities where you can extend your existing skills to the latest technologies.

    Before I close this introductory post, I have an ask of you. As I mentioned before, this blog is for you. We’ll do our very best to make sure that your experience here is valuable. To do that, I’d really appreciate it if you could take 5 to 10 minutes to connect with us, either by email at cdnsoldevs@microsoft.com, Twitter at @cdnsoldevs, or LinkedIn and tell us what kind of projects you’re working on or technologies you’re working with; what platforms you target and what languages do you use; how you’re keeping up with what’s new in technology and updating your skills; and most importantly, how we help you with any of those.

    Next Steps

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