I have had a couple people ping me about the Australian Architect forum and thought i would post the details on my blog...note all these details are also on the AAF site: http://www.architectureforum.net.au 

Sydney Wednesday, 27th June 2007

Melbourne Friday, 29th June 2007

Registration is $295

 

Agenda:

 

Internet Service Bus, SOA, Web Services, and Web 2.0:  Concepts, Technical Overview and Reference Architecture

Composite Applications integrate (compose) individual “services” within an organization into a (hopefully) coherent whole.  In addition to acting as a loosely-coupled ‘glue’ for cross-organisational capability, composite applications typically allow business rules and data to rapidly evolve in response to changing business environments.  SOA and Web Services have been traditional Composite Application integration technologies, with Enterprise Service Buses often forming the core of enterprise solutions leveraging these technologies and approaches.

However, many business scenarios extend beyond the enterprise.  Composite applications are often “situation, just-in-time,” ad hoc projects.  Other scenarios involve small-to-medium business (SMBs), where multi-party ad hoc solutions often cannot justify systematic investments in an ESB.  Internet Services Buses (ISBs) are multi-party ESBs in the “cloud”, and have emerged as a possible way to support these ad hoc and SMB solutions.  This keynote will present a reference architecture for ISBs, addressing the relationships between ISBs and ESBs, the business value behind ISBs, and some of the drivers and challenges faced by this emerging technology. 


Dr. Donald Ferguson

10.00 – 10.50
Choice of three breakout sessions

Breakout 1

Solution Architecture in action - a banking case study

Ceating a workable solution architecture that encompasses a myriad of disparate systems poses many challenges. Some challenges are technical but many are not and require an Architect to understand both the Business Domain and the Technical Domain and to provide the bridge between the two. If an Architect focuses on the technical issues only and does not get involved in the implementation of a system from the business perspective, then the system is in danger of being unusable, or worse, may not solve the original business problem. As an Architect you will need to make many important decisions about how a system will or won't be used and many of these will be political as well as technical. As Architect you need to always keep an eye on the bigger picture and ensure things stay on track and true to the solution vision. The bigger the project, especially if there are multiple teams involved, then the greater the challenges in keeping the vision alive.

This case study provides a real world solution architecture story, from initial concept through to the first production release, where Andrew was the Solution Architect on a project encompassing 20+ systems that were all needed to form a working solution. Come along and hear the challenges faced, how things were approached, the tools used and get some tips from the Architect.

Andrew Dingley, Principal Architect

Breakout 2

Realising Value from Common Services: Identifying and Analysing Opportunities for Reuse

Much has been written on the technical implementation of re-usable services but how do we get to the point where we’re ready to write code? This talk investigates the analysis techniques that allow us to not only re-engineer business processes but also identify common, re-usable services and transition the concepts into working solutions. Richard discusses his experiences on real world case studies from a major international airline, a “big three” automotive manufacturer and one of the worlds largest consumer finance companies and shares the lessons learned. The talk presents an alternative view on how the business process visibility available to IT units can be combined with technical delivery know-how to deliver cutting improvements to the bottom line; IT becomes a strategic enabler and not just another cost of doing business. 

Breakout 3

Applying the Latest Evolution of IBM Patterns for e-Business

The IBM Patterns for e-Business (p4eb) have been used by architects and specialists in sales and delivery situations for a number of years. They can be used to provide a step by step approach to designing a solution for a client, by partitioning the problem into logical business patterns. These patterns are then refined through application, runtime and deployment patterns. The advantage of using p4eb is that they are a great productivity tool in designing systems and also express the design in a common language that is easily understood. With the advent of SOAs and Web 2.0, the p4eb are evolving to make use of these new technologies. Significant work is underway to update the patterns so they reflect the current thinking in both these areas, providing new solution approaches.

This presentation will give an overview of the p4eb, discuss how they are evolving, and describe how they have been used.

Dr Paul Ashley, Lead Architect ,SOA Advanced Technology, IBM Australia/New Zealand

10.50 – 11.00


 Morning Tea 

11.10 – 12.00

Choose to attend one Round Table

Round Table 1

Intellectual Properties and legal ramifications with writing Software in Australia 

As  a partner of Mallesons Stephen Jaques for over 20 years and President of ACS and on World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO) panel of arbitrators for the resolution of intellectual property disputes Philip Argy is uniquely qualified to lead this discussion on the discussion on the legal ramifications and challenges of writing software in Australia. 


Philip Argy, National President

Round Table 2

Role of the Architect on Agile Projects

Whatever the software development process, e.g. Waterfall, RUP or Agile, software engineers aim to develop an architecture to perform in terms of testability, agility and all the other “-ilities”.There are many different software development practices available to create such an architecture; they vary depending on the SDLC. Agile practitioners value “sensible” and “common sense” practices such as “deferring design decisions as late as possible” or “thinking big and acting small”. This round-table is an opportunity to explore how we do things the Agile way at ThoughtWorks and share experiences.

Round Table 3

Challenges of creating a solution architecture that leverages a rules engine to address dynamic customer requirements 

Rules Engines are useful in separating business logic from business rules, but they may also be used in many other situations to improve a system, for example maintainability and performance. This round table will discuss what types of problems have been solved using rules engines and discuss the techniques for integrating rules engines into a system.

Steven Williams, Supervising Consultant

Round Table 4

Obstacles to an Agile Development 

(Melbourne Only)

Agile development processes are increasingly gaining wider popularity.  However, a shift to agile development (or even the adoption of a handful of practices) can be met with resistance and even seen as threatening to an organisation or individuals within an organisation.  Agile processes sound like common sense, but they can turn out to be quite challenging and difficult to adopt.  This round table will discuss challenges and problems that have been encountered when adopting agile development processes and possible ways to overcome these challenges.


Susan Entwisle, Group Manager Emerging Technologies and Chris Chan

Green is the New Black

(Sydney Only)

Green is the new black. In a very short period of time, global warming and environmental responsibility have claimed a place on the executive agenda. The IT industry is one of the largest consumers of energy, and therefore one of the largest contributors to carbon emissions. Against this background, the IT industry is now grappling with the challenges of environmental stewardship.


Michael Conlin, Regional Chief Technologist

Round Table 5

Enterprise Search Strategy

This Round Table will cover why an enterprise search strategy is important, key considerations and common pitfalls in implementing enterprise search and strategies for integrating multiple sources of information into a single interface.

Round Table 6

Rapid Development Process

Teams today are faced with increasing pressure to deliver quality products on a shorter timeline. This discussion looks to development process to ensure our software remains high quality whilst meeting the requirements of the customer and reducing the timeline.


Alistair Deneys, Technical Leader 

Round Table 7

Topic Coming Soon

Description Coming Soon

12.10 – 13.00 

Choose to attend one Round Table

Round Table 1

SOA/ESB/Integration in the real world

Discuss with Dr. Donald Ferguson a Microsoft Technical Fellow how Composite Applications integrate (compose) individual “services” within an organization into a (hopefully) coherent whole.  In addition to acting as a loosely-coupled ‘glue’ for cross-organisational capability, composite applications typically allow business rules and data to rapidly evolve in response to changing business environments.  SOA and Web Services have been traditional Composite Application integration technologies, with Enterprise Service Buses often forming the core of enterprise solutions leveraging these technologies and approaches.

Round Table 2

Pluggable application frameworks for Agile delivery
OSGi and similar application component frameworks allow selective feature bundling and deployment.  This can be used to manage incremental software delivery cycles and break down monolithic applications to achieve service orientation within applications.

Round Table 3

Aspect Oriented Programming

Aspect Oriented Programing can be used to implement many common cross-cutting concerns found in your typical enterprise application. The Spring framework for Java and .NET provides a powerful and flexible AOP framework that allows custom aspects to be developed and integrated into an application easily. This round table will discuss some of the ways Spring AOP has been used on previous Java and .NET projects, limitations of the AOP framework on both platforms as well as providing an opportunity to discuss some of the alternatives to Spring AOP that have recently emerged.


Steven Williams, Supervising Consultant and Rob Biernat, Senior Consultant

Round Table 4

Software Factories for Systems Integrators

(Melbourne Only)

Henry Ford was one of the pioneers in product line development, in the early 20th century, leading to higher productivity and quality within the automotive industry. In the IT industry, a majority of application development is performed using a craftsman approach where application developers hand stitch applications to deliver business applications. Without fundamental changes to the methods, practices and tools used to develop software the IT industry will struggle to meet demand, improve quality, reduce costs, and increase collaboration across the business and IT. Software Factories aim to address these issues, using the same approach as Henry Ford, by industrialising software development. What does a software factory approach mean for System Integrators? What are the implications, challenges and benefits? How does it fit into a Global Delivery Model? This round table will discuss these topics and more…


Susan Entwisle, Group Manager Emerging Technologies

Automated User and Desktop Provisioning

(Sydney Only)

Service delivery automation has gone a long way in the past few years and specifically in user and desktop provisioning arena, there are many promising tools that are set to change the way desktop and user provisioning request are fulfilled. This round table will focus on Zero Touch Provisioning framework from Microsoft to explore how automated user and desktop provisioning can help many organizations seeking to reduce total cost of ownership and wanting to derive value from desktop infrastructure investments.


Behzad Omidi, System Architect

Round Table 5

A portal into the business

Strategies for effectively integrating business critical information and reporting with collaborative tools.

Round Table 6

The value of IASA to you as a professional

In this session we will explore how IASA can help Architects in Australia grow as a professional group and discuss the ways that 'you' as an individual and 'you' as a member of a wider community can help make this happen.

Round Table 7

Accurate software estimates

As technology continues its march forward, why are so many software projects destined to overrun drastically, or even worse, fail all together. This round table aims to discuss a number of real world techniques that will help attendees create more accurate software estimates.


Paul Clapton

13.00 – 13.30 

 Lunch 

13.30 – 14.05

Lunchtime Presentation

Description Coming Soon!

14.10 – 15.00

Choice of three breakout sessions

Breakout 1

The Web Service Software Factory and EA - Using is for real

This is a real-world example that reveals the practical lessons learnt on a project undertaken by Object for Infomedia that used Team Foundation Server with Process MeNtOR Team Guide, Microsoft Visual Studio 2005, the Web Service Software Factory and Sparx Systems Enterprise Architect.

This will cover the steps taken in designing the application and the choice of architecture; the use and combination of the tools selected; integration with the selected User Interface technology (Adobe Flex); the implementation of external interfaces to the system and the development environment and will also discuss the challenges along the way.


Jon Embury, Senior Consultant

Breakout 2

Real World Enterprise Library

Join Tom Hollander who recently returned to Australia after completing a three year adventure in Microsoft’s corporate headquarters in Redmond, USA as a Product Manager in the patterns & practices team in charge of working with customers to plan and deliver releases such as Enterprise Library, the Guidance Automation Toolkit and the Web Service Software Factory.

Breakout 3

No Nukes - Don't Detonate your Legacy Software

The project team faced a tough challenge.  The business wanted to build some major new features for their resource planning application, but the existing code was a bit of a mess.  Serious design problems were immediately apparent which would make it difficult to deliver the new features required, and the current functionality could not be clearly understood.  There was almost no automated test coverage to give confidence.  Surely it would be best to start from a clean sheet of paper?

Instead the team embraced the legacy and carefully renovated the application while delivering new functionality.  This enabled us to make earlier and more frequent releases and reduce risk dramatically. This session will share the approach used by the team to quickly and safely extend and improve the application.

15.10 – 16.00

Choose to attend one Round Table

Round Table 1

Web vNext - rich clients for the next generation

As one Queensland’s leading Flex developers, and Director of omniEffect – a company focusing on the ‘End User Experience’, Michael Wise is well-appointed to lead a discussion on how rules are changing for building next-generation websites.

Round Table 2

Dynamic languages in the enterprise
Ruby and other dynamic programming languages are gaining traction among many of our customers globally.  What constitutes an "enterprise-ready" platform and does Ruby meet the criteria?

Round Table 3

Project Tale (Land Exchange, Victorian Government)

Land Exchange is a Victorian Government initiative that will enable people to exchange land related information and conduct transactions via the Internet. Its projects are ground-breaking systems that present a number of significant challenges in the area of electronic service delivery, security, and integration. The system, developed by Object Consulting, represented a host of architectural lessons – not to mention requirements, project management, development and testing. In short it is a 'best of breed' enterprise level Java EE based system.


Brett McDowall, Chief Architect

Round Table 4

The Management and Re-use of SOA Assets

This Roundtable session will look at the importance of management process to support the definition, capture, review and consumption of re-usable services and assets.

(Sydney Presenter) - Richard Dowling, Lead Architect, Rational Brand, IBM Australia/New Zealand Software Group
( Melbourne Presenter) - Davyd Norris, Senior IT Architect, Rational Brand, IBM Australia/New Zealand Software Group

Round Table 5

Role of the Software Architect

What do Architects really do? What do they need to know? How do you become an Architect? How is IASA helping? In this session, we will explore the first three questions and talk about the work IASA is currently doing in the global architecture community to help answer them and explore ways that you, as an individual, can contribute.

Round Table 6

Taking a deeper look at Sparx Systems Enterprise Architect

Description Coming Soon


Andrew Dingley, Principal Architect and Jon Embury, Senior Consultant


Sydney
Only
Sam Mancarella, Sparx CTO Melbourne Only
Ben Constable, Sparx CEO

Round Table 7

Topic Coming Soon

Description Coming Soon

16.00 – 17.00

Choose to attend one Round Table

Round Table 1

Architecting for Security 

This round table will cover integrating security into your life cycle, identifying your objectives, knowing your threats, using an iterative approach and know your obligations to Law, regulation, compliance, policy, standards, etc.

Round Table 2

The Architecture of Collaboration

Description Coming Soon

Geoff Ward

Round Table 3

Challenges of becoming an architect

What skills, experiences and other attributes are needed to be an Architect? What levels and types of Architects are out there and what exactly do they do?

'Architecture' in IT can mean a range of things. Typically it is a poorly structured discipline within the software industry as a whole and within the software engineering fraternity in particular. One of the reasons is the number of 'soft' aspects to architecture which have proven difficult to formularise, codify and document. 

Most Architects work in an ad hoc manner and will have a range of tricks and techniques and some shortcuts and preconceived ideas of what works and what doesn’t. But very few Architects can actually describe how to actually architect a system clearly, which makes it very difficult for people wishing to become architects.

Brett McDowall, Chief Architect

Round Table 4

User Interfaces in an SOA World

This Roundtable session will explore the role of Portals as the user interface of choice for developing composite applications. Both Rich Client and Server-based portals will be discussed and positioned.


(Sydney Presenter) -
Vinod Ralh, Lead Architect - SOA, IBM Australia/New Zealand Software Group( Melbourne Presenter) - Pascal Schmid, Senior IT Architect, IBM Australia/New Zealand Software Group

Round Table 5

Is an SOA really achievable in your organisation? - Sydney only

Will explore the barriers to adopting an SOA and how and if they can be overcome


Glen Willis 

SOA: Obstacles to and Opportunities for boundaryless information flow

Round Table 6

Topic Coming Soon

Description Coming Soon

Round Table 7

Topic Coming Soon

Description Coming Soon

17.05 – 17.55

Locknote Address - All

The IT Architect Role Redux

A light-hearted view of the various roles of IT Architects perform in the course of practicing their profession


Henry Co, Executive IT Architect, SOA Advanced Technology, IBM Australia/New Zealand Software Group