Concurrently Speaking

A blog by Niklas Gustafsson on topics loosely related to concurrency and manycore

Browse by Tags

Tagged Content List
  • Blog Post: Isolation in Maestro

    As noted in the Dr Dobb's article , Maestro is primarily about establishing isolation domains so that we can cut down on the number of undocumented dependencies between components. With a language like C# or VB, any two references of type T could be referring to the same object, and if you consider a...
  • Blog Post: Maestro

    I had expected that the first word on Maestro would come on this blog, but that's what happens when you take time between posts. We first discussed it during PDC at the Thursday panel on parallel programming, we discussed it on Channel 9 , and then Josh Phillips posted his excellent article about...
  • Blog Post: C++ Agents

    At PDC 2008, we talked a lot about agents-based programming, in particular during the native C++ talks on parallel programming. We showed how the agents library that we plan to ship in VS 2010 can be used to overlap I/O with computationally intensive processing to raise the throughput of a program. I...
  • Blog Post: PDC Day 3

    I did my first talk Wednesday, "A Deep Dive Into the Concurrency Runtime," where I talked about how to extend the PPL and Agents native libraries and how to build your own scheduler with our runtime. A rather dry topic, I almost managed to bore myself. However, the room was filled to capacity and more...
  • Blog Post: Separating concerns

    Last night, I realized that in my last post on messages, I skipped over one of the essential characters of message-passing APIs: that they separate the code that produces data from the code that acts on its availability with some level(s) of indirection. Consider the use of 'Future<T>' to produce...
  • Blog Post: What About Today's Gigacore Applications?

    As should be clear from the previus post, I'm not a big fan of the threads + locks model. An alternative approach is the one offered by message-passing, which is used every day in distributed applications and with enormous success. The world-wide web is one giant concurrent application, if you will:...
  • Blog Post: To Share Or Not To Share

    I remember finding the big-endian vs. little-endian argument fascinating back in the day when there was a real question about which processor architectures were going to wind up on top. It was interesting both because it really did seem so very important (I liked little-endian machines) and it was so...
Page 1 of 1 (7 items)