I love origami and have spent much of my life learning about it and practising it. I've always been pretty interesting in Unit Origami and Origamic Architecture because of the mindblogglingly (hrmm... i think I have blogging on the brain) beautiful structures you can create out of one, a few, or even hundreds of sheets of paper. It's probably my inner geek speaking, but being able to generate complex mathematical objects out of simple peices of paper with a few folds in them is a pretty awe-inspiring things for me. Kind of the inverse of seeing the lightning a few nights ago. Instead of being wowed by nature i nthe large, I'm no less wowed by mathematics in the small.

I thought I'd seen most of what origami could produce, being occasionally interested in some new impressive feat, but this article in the New York Times stunned me. Using incredibly few folds, David Huffman is able to produce extremely compelling shapes. His method? He uses curves folds instead of the standard straight folds that everyone else seems to use. You can see the results with these images:

This has certainly renewed my interest in origami (like most things it waxes and wanes) and I definitely want to attack some projects this week!!