November, 2007

Dan on eScience & Technical Computing @ Microsoft

eScience & Technical Computing - Web Services and Scientific Research

November, 2007

  • Dan on eScience & Technical Computing @ Microsoft

    Manycore and Multicore Workshop: Architectures, Applications And Directions

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    The Manycore and Multicore Workshop has a really good line-up of speakers - should be a good 1 1/2 days...

    • John Manferdelli, Microsoft Corporation - Supercomputing and Mass Market Desktops
    • Chuck Moore, AMD Corporation - The Role of Accelerated Computing in the Multi-core Era
    • Jack Dongarra, Univ. of Tennessee - An Overview of High Performance Computing and Challenges for the Future
    • Charles Leiserson, MIT - Multithreaded Programming in Cilk
    • Dan Reed, RENCI/UNC Chapel Hill - Multicore: Let’s Not Focus on the Present
    • Dave Kirk, NVIDIA Corporation - NVIDIA CUDA Software and GPU Parallel Computing Architecture
    • Panel on Manycore/Multicore's Programmability Gap
    • Vivek Sarkar, Rice University - Portable Parallel Programming for Heterogeneous Multicore Computing
    • Dave Patterson, UC Berkeley - The Parallel Computing Landscape: A Berkeley View 2.0
    • Stephen Pawlowski, Intel Corporation - Supercomputing for the Masses

    Manycore and Multicore Workshop: Architectures, Applications And Directions

    Sponsored by Microsoft Corporation

    Workshop dates: Sunday, November 11 - Monday, November 12, 2007
    Location: SC07 Conference, Reno, Nevada
    More information can be found at http://sc07.supercomputing.org/

    The era of "Supercomputing applications are what supercomputing does best," which is generally associated with heavyweight, numerically-intensive science computation, is rapidly converging with real-time and consumer applications such as computer gaming and multimedia. These new application genres are achieving a level of sophistication that makes them almost indistinguishable from supercomputing applications, and, consequently, are driving the recent developments in processor architectures. Most of the emphasis over the last few years has been on multi-core architectures, which are used as CPUs (e.g. quad-cores) in the current desktop and laptop systems and also used to develop supercomputing clusters.

    Manycore and Multicore Workshop (UNC-CH Computer Science)

  • Dan on eScience & Technical Computing @ Microsoft

    Dan Reed joins Microsoft Research

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    As Dan Reed say's in his blog posting on coming to Microsoft Research - "It doesn’t get any cooler than this."...need I say more?

    On December 3, I will embark on the next installment of my own future, which will place me in the center of the ever-evolving computing revolution. On that day, I will be joining Microsoft to head a new research initiative (see the Microsoft Research press release and RENCI/UNC press release) in scalable and multicore computing. I am enormously excited, as these are among the most interesting technical problems in computing, and they are my long-time professional interests. I will be working with Microsoft researchers and product developers, as well as industry partners and academics. It doesn’t get any cooler than this.

    (more)

    Reed's Ruminations - A blog by Dan Reed

  • Dan on eScience & Technical Computing @ Microsoft

    eScience group on Facebook

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    Early this week Savas and I were discussing social networking ideas and we decided to create a eScience group on Facebook to see if that would help bring the community together and share ideas.  Feel free to join

  • Dan on eScience & Technical Computing @ Microsoft

    Supercomputing 07

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    Was at Supercomputing last week - overall the event went really well.  There was also a few announcements from the HPC team - the big one being the name and beta availability of Windows HPC Server 2008 and the new banners.

    clip_image001

    Attended part of the Manycore and Multicore Computing: Architectures, Applications And Directions Workshop, which had a packed house - I'm guessing due to both the topic as well as the stellar list of speakers.

    074

    In the Microsoft booth at SC - our collaborators from UCSD and Oxford had a optiputer demo featuring a large multi-tile display showing HD Streams of researchers at Oxford using a microscope at UCSD and analyzing the results on a a HPC Cluster at Oxford - all while collaborating using the display.

     

    091 One highlights of the event - was an international man of mystery giving out awards to the HPC institutes..097

  • Dan on eScience & Technical Computing @ Microsoft

    Microsoft Research SenseCam

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    senseadJust heard the MSR Sensors and Device Group in Cambridge updated their SenseCam website with information on the latest version as well as all the great research happening around Alleviating Memory Loss with patients in early stages of Alzheimer's Disease.  This is great to see...

    Check out the article as well - Memorable Support for SenseCam Memory-Retention Research

    Microsoft Research SenseCam

    SenseCam is a wearable digital camera that is designed to take photographs passively, without user intervention, while it is being worn. Unlike a regular digital camera or a cameraphone, SenseCam does not have a viewfinder or a display that can be used to frame photos. Instead, it is fitted with a wide-angle (fish-eye) lens that maximizes its field-of-view. This ensures that nearly everything in the wearer’s view is captured by the camera, which is important because a regular wearable camera would likely produce many uninteresting images.

    SenseCam also contains a number of different electronic sensors. These include light-intensity and light-color sensors, a passive infrared (body heat) detector, a temperature sensor, and a multiple-axis accelerometer. These sensors are monitored by the camera’s microprocessor, and certain changes in sensor readings can be used to automatically trigger a photograph to be taken.

    Sensecamgraph_1

    Microsoft Research SenseCam

  • Dan on eScience & Technical Computing @ Microsoft

    Moved into new MSR building

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    It's been a bit hectic for the last few weeks - which included moving into the new MSR building 99 on campus. 

    Microsoft Research Moves into New Headquarters

    On Nov. 12, Microsoft Research Redmond moved into a brand-new building on the company’s West Campus, adjacent to NE 148th Avenue in Redmond. Building 99, the new organizational headquarters, features a four-story atrium, an expansive outdoor meeting space, and indoor and outdoor dining areas.

    Building 99 entry
    Building 99, the new home of Microsoft Research’s flagship Redmond lab.

    The building, part of a campus expansion in Redmond, is designed to facilitate collaboration among researchers and includes areas small and large for individuals and groups to meet and exchange forward-looking ideas.

    Microsoft Research Moves into New Headquarters

  • Dan on eScience & Technical Computing @ Microsoft

    Dinner with a View

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    Every once in a while you get the privilege to enjoy something you never would have imaged - tonight I was lucky enough to have this as my view for dinner.

    White House

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