February, 2008

Dan on eScience & Technical Computing @ Microsoft

eScience & Technical Computing - Web Services and Scientific Research

February, 2008

  • Dan on eScience & Technical Computing @ Microsoft

    What makes Scoble cry: Microsoft’s WorldWide Telescope?

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    In case you didn't see the blog entry on ZDNet about WWT What makes Scoble cry: Microsoft’s WorldWide Telescope?, I can tell you the work that Curtis and Jonathan have done is amazing...stay tuned.

    Robert Scoble posted about a Microsoft product that he couldn’t disclose in the works that brought tears of joy to his eyes. He wrote:

    Yesterday was one of those days. Curtis Wong and Jonathan Fay, researchers at Microsoft, fired up their machines and showed me something that I can’t tell you about until February 27th. I’m sure you’ll read about his work in the New York Times or TechCrunch, among other places. It’s too inspiring to stay a secret for long.

    While watching the demo I realized the way I look at the world was about to change. While listening to Wong I noticed a tear running down my face. It’s been a long while since Microsoft did something that had an emotional impact on me like that.

    What makes Scoble cry: Microsoft’s WorldWide Telescope? | Between the Lines | ZDNet.com

  • Dan on eScience & Technical Computing @ Microsoft

    [Paper] Statistical Resolution of Ambiguous HLA Typing Data

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    A MSR Tech Report is now available on Statistical Resolution of Ambiguous HLA Typing Data - Here's the non-technical summary of the paper:

    At the core of the human adaptive immune response is the train-to-kill mechanism in which specialized immune cells are sensitized to recognize small peptides from foreign sources (e.g., from HIV virus or bacteria). Following this sensitization, these immune cells are then activated to kill other cells which display this same peptide (and which contain this same foreign peptide). However, in order for sensitization and killing to occur, the foreign peptide must be ‗paired up‘ with one of the infected person‘s other specialized immune molecules—an HLA molecule. The way in which peptides interact with these HLA molecules defines if and how an immune response will be generated. There is a huge repertoire of such HLA molecules, with almost no two people having the same set. Furthermore, a person‘s HLA type can determine their susceptibility to disease, or the success of a transplant, for example. However, obtaining high quality HLA data for patients is often difficult because of the great cost and specialized laboratories required, or because the data are historical and cannot be retyped with modern methods. Therefore, we introduce a statistical model which can make use of existing high-quality HLA data, to infer higher-quality HLA data from lower-quality data.

    Statistical Resolution of Ambiguous HLA Typing Data

  • Dan on eScience & Technical Computing @ Microsoft

    TechREACH - Middle School program to increase interest in STEM

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    It's great to see programs like TechREACH reaching out to middle school students to get them interested in STEM subjects. 

    TechREACH, a Washington State program, increases middle school students’ interest in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) through hands-on curriculum, mentoring, and teacher professional development. The goal of the program is to increase the number of underrepresented middle school students who pursue science, technology, engineering, and math studies, degrees, and careers. During the 2006-2007 school year, nearly 100 Eastern Washington middle school students benefited from participating in TechREACH clubs.

    Academic Resource Center – Content

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