January, 2009

Dan on eScience & Technical Computing @ Microsoft

eScience & Technical Computing - Web Services and Scientific Research

January, 2009

  • Dan on eScience & Technical Computing @ Microsoft

    The Earth, Stars, and Planets in 3D

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    One of the coolest new features of the WWT Solstice Borealis Beta (released at the beginning of Jan) is the ability to see the Earth, Stars, and Planets in a stereoscopic 3D effect.  I’ve been using the Anaglyph mode (View |  {arrow} | Stereo | Anaglyph) which uses the stylish red/cyan glasses shown below to not only look at the Stars, but you can zoom all the way out and see the lattice structure made up galaxies of the universe.  AnaglyphChecking out the planets, like Mars, Saturn, etc is also very impressive.  Going down to Earth, you can change your perspective by holding down the ctrl key and then you can fly into objects like Mount St. Helens

    Mount St. HelensMount St. Helens in normal viewMtStHelens3D  Mount St. Helens in stereoscopic view

    Check it out if you have a pair of red/cyan glasses – they are all the rage :-)

  • Dan on eScience & Technical Computing @ Microsoft

    WorldWide Telescope Academic Development Kit Release -Microsoft Research

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    With this ADK, users can convert their own astronomical images/data to the format that can be read by WWT and share with other WWT users.  Can’t wait to see more images/datasets made available.

    WorldWide Telescope Academic Development Kit, January 2009 Release

    The WorldWide Telescope (WWT) Academic Development Kit, January 2009 release contains two utilities that enable people to convert their astronomical images, panoramas, sky surveys, and planetary textures to a format that can be read by WWT and shared with other WWT users. It produces image pyramids of the photographs, thumbnails, and WTML files. WTML files are XML files in the WWT format that point to the images on the Internet and store details of how they are to be displayed in WWT and metadata such as image title and credits. The WWT SphereToaster Tool enables users to provide images in an equirectangular format that covers all or part of the inside or outside of a sphere. This includes, for example, cylindrical projections of panoramas and all-sky surveys. SphereToaster converts these to a different projection system—the TOAST system, currently unique to WWT—and then stores an image pyramid of the resulting TOAST-projected image. The tool also produces thumbnails and WTML files. The WWT StudyChopper Tool enables users to provide photographs of small parts of the sky, such as a high-resolution image of the Crab Nebula, and enter appropriate coordinate information and metadata. It creates image pyramids of the photographs, thumbnails, and WTML files. Once the output image pyramids and thumbnails are hosted by the user's servers and the WTML files are made available to others, anyone with access to the WTML files will be able to browse the images in WWT.

    WorldWide Telescope Academic Development Kit, January 2009 Release - Microsoft Research

  • Dan on eScience & Technical Computing @ Microsoft

    Science Images in Photosynth

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    Here are a few really good synths of scientific images in Photosynth.  You can find others using Microscopes or Biology.  And there is even a Dissected Cat if you have a strong stomach.

    Obelia, polyps, golangia by ppberk

    Micrographs of powder coating material by SynthSets

    Frog Kidney by ppberk

  • Dan on eScience & Technical Computing @ Microsoft

    Swearing-in Ceremony on the Web

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    It will be great to be able to watch the swearing-in ceremony from any computer on the internet.  That combine with CNN/Photosynth capturing The Moment of the oath should be pretty amazing – can’t wait to see that synth…

    How it Will Work

    We’ll take your photos from every angle, combine them with CNN’s professional shots, and produce what we hope will be an amazing experience that will be shown live on CNN. And you thought the Jessica Yellin hologram was cool! The synth will also be available for everyone to see on CNN.com.

    If you have a…

    Camera Phone. Take one photo of the moment when the President Elect raises his hand to take the Oath, and email it as soon as you can to cnnmoment@live.com. Don’t worry if he’s too small to see clearly in your photo. As long as you get the Capitol building in your shot it will synth in and help reconstruct the environment.

    Digital Camera. Take three photos (wide-angle, mid-zoom, full-zoom) of the President Elect while he is being sworn in. As soon as you can get to an Internet connection, email them to us at cnnmoment@live.com. Make sure your email message is less than 10MB in size. Break it into a couple of messages if your three photos combine to more than 10MB.

    Watch the Swearing-in Ceremony on the Web

    Don’t miss it when Barack Obama takes the Oath of Office next Tuesday, January 20th. As part of our commitment to making this the most open inauguration in history, we’ll be streaming the swearing-in ceremony on our site using Microsoft’s Silverlight.

    You can view high quality Silverlight streams, in full screen, and enjoy related inaugural video content.

    As long as you have an Internet connection, you’ll be able to watch the ceremony as if you were there. Visit www.pic2009.org on Tuesday, January 20th to watch the swearing-in live.

    The swearing-in ceremony begins at 11:30 a.m. ET on the steps of the U.S. Capitol. Take a look at the rest of the scheduled events for Inaugural Weekend.

    Watch the Swearing-in Ceremony on the Web | The Inauguration of President-elect Barack Obama and Vice President-elect Joe Biden

  • Dan on eScience & Technical Computing @ Microsoft

    NodeXL for viewing and analyzing network graphs is available again (formally .NetMap)

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    NodeXL – the app formally know as .NetMap is available again on CodePlex.  NodeXL is a Excel template and addin for viewing and analyzing network graphs.  There are a whole slew of updates and bug fixes.  Check it out….
  • Dan on eScience & Technical Computing @ Microsoft

    So you don’t think you can Sing?

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    Now you can have your own musical accompaniment to match your voice without having to worry about artistic differences.  I’ll have to play with Songsmith and see if can help even my voice sound decent :-)  But you won’t see me posting the songs or videos online.

    Just think – you can add a musical soundtrack to your everyday tasks…doing the dishes, walking the dog, or the one I like – kids saying singing “Science is Cool”….neat to see this product coming out of Microsoft Research.

    songsmith

    What is Songsmith?
    Songsmith generates musical accompaniment to match a singer’s voice. Just choose a musical style, sing into your PC’s microphone, and Songsmith will create backing music for you. Then share your songs with your friends and family, post your songs online, or create your own music videos.
    Where can I get it?
    A free trial download is available on our download page.

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