Mick has a posting with the presentation (and the code) but here are a few grabs:

Microsoft's publication: The business value of RFID

Example uses of RFID today:

  • Vatican Apostolic Library

Already, 50,000 volumes in the public reading rooms have been tagged with Texas Instruments’ Tag-it™ 13.56 MHz inlays that are compliant with ISO / IEC 15693 standards.

  • Bio-mark as using RFID to tag fish as well as other animals.

http://siliconvalley.internet.com/news/article.php/3098551

Potential uses for the future:

  • Smart dust - adding tags to your fingers to create a virtual keyboard (potential a new UI)
  • Golem Dust is a solar powered (effectively active tag) very small and has sensors on board (could be used for emergency situations). Could be used to broadcast location and movement across a wide area.
  • What if you could make digestible, degradable (perhaps even nutritious) RFID chips that could be put into food

Imagine being able to scan that hamburger in the market and find out where it came from, where its been and when. 

There is a number of considerations that highlight benefit and drawbacks of RFID. I used an acronym from my business diploma learning "SPELTEC" representing Social, Political, Economic, Legal, Technical, Environmental and Cultural. For each I listed a good and bad reason for RFID.

I was quite amused when researching the subject on finding an article by Mary Starret

"I’d rather go naked" says Mary! She declared the use of RFID in clothing as an Orwellian technology as it will be Italian clothing designer Benetton.

I guess the point to remember when making a responsible decision around RFID is "you can't turn these things off".