Expanded TechEd Australia 2011 Version

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Local Overview :

Cloud computing in Australian organisations revealed at TechEd Australia

Intelledox announced an extension of its cloud-based solution set - with the integration of the Windows Azure platform and Intelledox document automation.Intelledox-2010-Logo 2Learn more here

 

Family HQ – Keeping families connected launches on Windows AzureFamily HQ

Australian Tech Ed attendees who sign up for the Expanz beta program during the event will receive a 30 free day #Azure Platform...

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Questions

Q:

Does Windows Azure allow you to deploy your Windows Services as part of your application or cloud-hosted service?

from Four 4 tips for developing Windows Services more efficiently

A:

Short Answer: Windows Azure is more than happy to run your Windows Services! While a more native approach is to use a Worker Role, a Windows Service can surely be deployed as well, and there are some very good use cases to recommend them.

More Detailed Answer: One good use case for deploying a Windows Service: you have legacy services and want to use the same binary on-premises and on-Azure. Maybe you are doing something fancy with Azure VM Roles. These are valid examples. In general – for something only targeting Azure – a Worker Role will be easier to build and debug. If you are trying to share code across a legacy Windows Service and a shiny new Windows Azure Worker Role, consider following the following good software engineering practice (something you may want to do anyway): factor out the “business logic” into its own class(es) and invoke it with just a few lines of code from either host (or a console app, a Web Service, a unit test (ahem), etc.).