July, 2009

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  • Engineering OneNote Blog

    Overview of OneNote 2010 – What’s new for you

    • 46 Comments

    David Rasmussen, the OneNote Group Program Manager also know as my boss, has posted a great overview of what’s new in OneNote 2010: http://blogs.msdn.com/david_rasmussen/archive/2009/07/15/onenote-2010-what-s-new-for-you.aspx

    David did an excellent job outlining what we have been working on since 2007 and it is just so exciting to be able to unveil these new features for you (our customers).

    I have pasted it below but I would also subscribe to David’s blog as he will be blogging about OneNote 2010. Without further ado:

    OneNote 2010 Investments Overview

    1. Universal Access

    We repeatedly hear that access to your notes and the ability to take them anywhere is very important, whether you’re at work, home or on the go. OneNote 2007 already provides offline availability and seamless sync, and a basic OneNote application for Windows Mobile. But we knew that was just the beginning. With OneNote 2010 we’ve added:

    • Sync to Cloud (Windows Live): Your notebooks sync and are available anywhere from any machine. Of course this is in addition to all the existing ways you can sync notebooks (file shares, SharePoint, USB drives etc.)
    • OneNote Web App: You can access and edit your entire notebook from a browser. Even on a machine that doesn’t have OneNote installed.
    • OneNote Mobile: A more complete OneNote version for Windows Mobile phones. Syncs whole notebooks. Syncs directly to the cloud. No need to tether your device. Richer editing support.

    Note: The above are not yet available in the Tech Preview unfortunately. We’re still finishing some integration work for sync to Windows Live.

    2. Sharing and Collaboration

    With OneNote 2007 we pioneered simultaneous multi-user editing of notebooks. OneNote 2007 auto-magically merges the edits, even simultaneous edits on the same page. This is valuable for single users (you can edit on desktop and laptop and not have one machine lock the file), but it’s even more valuable for  teams sharing a notebook for plans, ideas, meetings and so on. Or perhaps a family notebook shared with your significant other. We’ve heard lots of positive feedback about this, and  it has completely transformed the way many teams work and collaborate. We’ve also heard about many families that use it for sharing home renovation plans, gardening info, recipes, wedding planning and so on.

    In OneNote 2010 we’ve added a number of features to make the experience of sharing with others more productive and intuitive. These include:

    • What’s new (aka Unread) highlighting: New content that someone else added or changed since you last looked at a page is highlighted so you can see what’s new on that page. Also, the notebook name, section tabs and page tabs are shown in bold so you can quickly navigate to pages with new content.
    • Author indicator: Content written by anyone other than you has a small color coded bar to the right with their initials. At a glance you can tell who wrote something.
    • Versioning: Quickly show past versions of any given page, who wrote it and when, with changes relative to previous versions highlighted.
    • Fast sync on same page: When multiple people are working on the same page we speed up the sync of that page so you can see other peoples edits in near real time.
    • We also added capabilities to be able to quickly search for recently added content (last day, week, month etc.) or get an overview of what given people changed on what days.
    • Merge two sections: This feature is more of a detail but it fits here. Sometimes people share notebooks using Live Mesh or Dropbox or other file sharing solutions. And you can end up with two forked copies of a section if you happened to make changes on two machines at once (you can read earlier posts for context, but OneNote cannot auto-magically merge simultaneous edits when working on these systems that copy files around underneath OneNote). So we’ve added the ability to manually merge any two sections if you ever get into this situation. Just tell OneNote which two sections you want merged and OneNote will take care of it.

    3. Better ways to Organize and Find your Notes

    Capturing, organizing and finding your information has always been at the heart of what OneNote does. We’ve made several enhancements in this core area. Some of these will be more understandable once we have detailed blog posts with screenshots.

    • Section and page tab improvements: making notebook navigation work better with a larger number of sections and pages, easier to create new sections, better page tab hierarchy visualization, collapse sub page groups, just drag left and right to create sub pages and organize your pages, insert new pages directly anywhere in your page tabs.
    • Fast “word wheel” search for navigation: the goal of this is to make search a super fast way to get to your regularly used notes. Historically search has been more of a “last resort” feature when you couldn’t find something. We’ve completely revamped this experience so it is now designed to make it the fastest way to get to any page including pages you visit regularly like your To Do list.
    • Wiki linking: you can easily create a link to an existing page or to a new page for a topic. You can do this by just typing the Wiki link syntax (e.g. just type [[The Page Title I Want]] ), or use our new page search experience from within the link dialog. This enables you to easily create Wiki like notebooks with lots of cross links across pages.
    • Quick filing: there are many ways to send content to OneNote (Print to OneNote, send mails from Outlook, send pages from Internet Explorer and so on). Our new Quick Filing experience pops up to let you pick where in your notebook you want to send it. It remembers the last places you sent things. You can search in Quick Filing to find a specific section or page if you want it somewhere else.

    4. Research and taking notes linked to documents, web pages

    OneNote is often used as a companion while researching topics and collecting information (e.g. a market analysis study, a class paper, a home renovation, a car purchase and so on). This often involves looking at web pages or documents and taking notes. You could also be reviewing a document or class lecture slides and taking notes as you’re looking through them. We’ve enhanced a number of things to make this experience better.

    • Docked OneNote: you can dock OneNote to the side of your screen. It docks alongside other windows (e.g. browser, Word, PowerPoint). OneNote minimizes UI and just shows the notes page alongside your document/browser.
    • Linked Note Taking: while in this mode, OneNote automatically links the notes you take to what you’re looking at – the web page URL, the selection point in Word, the current slide in PowerPoint. Later in OneNote you can hover on that link and you’ll see a thumbnail preview of the original document, you can click on it and it will open and take you back to what you were looking at when you wrote the note.
    • Auto text wrapping: this goes well with Docked OneNote but is useful in other cases too. OneNote now wraps text outlines to fit the windows size if there is only one outline on the page. This makes it easy to see all your notes even when OneNote is docked to a relatively narrow window on the side.
    • IRM protected printouts: this is mainly for enterprise and training scenarios. The idea is that companies can distribute things like product manuals or class notes in OneNote that are protected intellectual property. The recipient can view these in OneNote and take their own personal notes on top of these materials and beside them. If for some reason the materials were viewed by an unauthorized person they would not see any of the protected material.
    • 64 bit print driver: Yes, OneNote 2010 has a new native print driver that fully supports 64 bit. It’s based on the XPS technology from Windows. It also has other virtues like better rendering quality when scaled.

    5. Editing improvements

    There are a number of basic editing improvements in OneNote. Below are some more prominent ones.

    • Basic styles: OneNote 2010 adds very basic styles like Heading 1,2,3. This does not have the power of Words styling features. OneNote is not designed for that level of document formatting. But it does give you a way to quickly have your meeting notes have a little structure.
    • Bullets improvements: this is a simple one but oft requested. First level bullets now indent from previous text.
    • Equations: OneNote 2010 now supports the ability to add math equations. Great for students or people who need to input math into their notebooks. OneNote will also support the ability to recognize hand written math equations and convert them when running on Windows 7.
    • Translation tooltips: OneNote can now show you a tooltip with a translation into your native language when your mouse hovers over a foreign language word. Great for language students, or if you’re working in a bi-lingual situation and need help understanding a word in a shared notebook or that you clipped from the web.

    6. Touch support

    With the rapidly increasing availability of touch enabled PCs and the enhanced touch experience in Windows 7, this was a natural thing for OneNote to support.

    • Finger panning and auto-switch: you can use your finger to scroll and pan around any page in OneNote. OneNote auto switches between pen, pan, and selection depending on your input device. So for example you can pan around a drawing with your left finger and draw with a tablet pen in your right hand. This makes for a very natural two handed interaction model.
    • Pinch zoom: we enabled pinch zooming within OneNote centered on the fingers.
    • Navigation controls improved for touch: we’ve made some small optimizations to make the UI easier to use with touch.

    7. Fluent UI

    OneNote now adopts the Fluent UI along with the other Office applications.

    • Ribbon: OneNote now has the Ribbon. We’ve designed this to optimize for the key OneNote scenarios and make them easier to use. This is also what enables us to more easily add features like math equation editing (the common controls for that use the Ribbon), and potential future features.
    • Office Backstage: This is new for Office 2010. OneNote will be taking advantage of it to make tasks like creating new notebooks, and new shared notebooks on the web easier (we’re still doing work on this).
  • Engineering OneNote Blog

    OneNote 2010 File Format Information

    • 15 Comments

    There have been a bunch of questions about the file format so I wanted to write a comprehensive blog post to cover all of your questions. Key points:

    • OneNote 2010 will fully read & write OneNote 2007 format notebooks, no need to convert a notebook
    • There is a new OneNote 2010 format to support new features (such as versions)
    • OneNote 2010 can convert notebooks from 2007<-->2010 formats and back

     

    OneNote 2010 will fully read & write any OneNote 2007 notebook; you do not need to convert your notebooks to use OneNote 2010. When you are on a 2007 notebook you will see that the title bar of the application says "(Compatibility Mode)" like this:

    clip_image001

    When you see this you are in a 2007 format notebook, conversely if you do not see this then you are viewing a 2010 format notebook. Also certain features will be disabled and greyed out in the UI this is normal and to use the new features you should convert the notebook to the 2010 format

    There is a new OneNote 2010 format to support new features such as:

    • OneNote Web App
    • Versions
    • Equations
    • Linked Note Taking
    • Recycle Bin
    • And more

    By default when you create a new notebook in OneNote 2010 the format of the notebook will be in the 2010 format so you can use all of these new features.

    If you are sharing with people who do not have OneNote you will be able to share your notes in the cloud (Windows Live) and they can view & edit those notes in the browser. If you need to work with others who have OneNote 2007 you will need to make sure the notebook is in the 2007 format.

    You can convert any notebook between versions by:

    1. Right-click on the notebook on the navigation bar (on the left)
    2. Choose Properties
    3. Click to convert the notebook to whatever version you would like, see here:

    clip_image002

    If you have more questions please use the comments below.

  • Engineering OneNote Blog

    OneNote included in all Office editions!

    • 15 Comments

    I wanted to pass on some of what Ed Bott said about Office & OneNote 2010 in his blog post: Office 2010 makes a splashy (but incomplete) public debut:

    Speaking of OneNote, it gets elevated to a starring role in this release—and it’s about time. In Office 2007, OneNote was part of the entry-level $150 Home and Student edition and the $680 Ultimate edition but was left out of every edition in between. For 2010, Microsoft is bullish enough on OneNote to make it a part of every edition. As Microsoft’s Bryant told me, “We think people will have OneNote open all the time just like they do with Outlook.”

    Thanks for the kind words Ed!

    I thought you all would like to know that OneNote is now included in all Office editions! That means no matter what Office box you buy or what you company purchases OneNote will be on the disc!  I remember when I first started on the team OneNote 2003 was a stand alone version of and even though we were a part of Office but wasn’t in the box.  I would tell people what product I worked on and people would ask “is OneNote in standard?” or “I have pro I don’t see OneNote”.  Then when we found that we were included in the Home & Student and Enterprise editions we were overjoyed and excited to be in the box.  But now I can tell people that no matter what version of Office they buy they will have OneNote!  I feel like we have really come along a long way from a standalone app to being a core part of the Office experience.

    FYI here are the Office editions:

    • Office Home and Student edition includes Word, PowerPoint, Excel and OneNote.
    • Office Home and Business edition replaces the previous Office Small Business edition. It includes all the programs from the Home and Student edition and adds Outlook.
    • Office Standard is the entry-level enterprise edition; it includes the programs from the Home and Business edition and adds Publisher
    • Office Professional continues to be the high-end package for consumers and small businesses. It includes the programs in Standard edition and adds the Access database management program.
    • Office Professional Plus is the high-end enterprise offering, adding SharePoint Workspace (formerly Groove Workspace) and InfoPath.
  • Engineering OneNote Blog

    OneNote 2010 Technical Preview

    • 13 Comments

    Today is a very exciting day because we are releasing the Office 2010 Technical Preview which is our first public debut of OneNote 2010 (and all of Office).  Here are some details, I love thinking in lists so you get a list:

    • Office 2010 is available in 32bit & 64bit
    • The build number is 4006.1100
    • Selected tested who signed up should be getting invites later today
    • We can’t wait to get feedback from you all with Send a Smiles and newsgroup posts
    • Thank you much for you interests in OneNote & Office!  I think you will enjoy
    • Note it is a technical preview, I use it every day, I don’t even use Office 2007 any longer, however there are still some unpolished edges that we are still working out

     

    Enough about logistics, what’s new in OneNote 2010?  We have a ton of new features that I am super excited to talk about and over the next few weeks & months we will post stuff on our blogs (mine, John’s, Mike’s, etc).  In due course we will tell you about all of the new features, but here is a quick teaser:

    • Fluent/Ribbon UI, OneNote now has the same Ribbon UI which was introduced in Office 2007
    • Sharing notebooks are so much better, know who wrote what, what’s new to you
    • Improved Search and organization and navigation in the UI is better, helping you find your stuff faster
    • Improved storage and sync
    • OneNote Web App

    Exciting times and now we can finally have a dialog with you all about these new features!

  • Engineering OneNote Blog

    What’s new in OneNote 2010 video

    • 3 Comments

    Looks like Ayça did a great job showing off OneNote 2010 in this what’s new video:

    You can see all of them on the new Office 2010 website: http://www.microsoft.com/office/2010/ or on the YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/officevideos.

  • Engineering OneNote Blog

    Unleash the Power of OneNote and SharePoint - No Cost Webinar by Malcolm Eaton

    • 3 Comments

    I just saw a mail from Malcolm Eaton from Captaré Consulting mentioning how he is going to have a free webinar about OneNote & SharePoint tomorrow, here are the details:

    Why are you still taking notes with pen and paper? You know you won't have time to type them up and send them to your team. Unleash the power of OneNote.

    What is OneNote? Microsoft Office OneNote 2007 is a digital notebook providing users: one place to gather notes and information, powerful search to find information quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks so they can manage information overload and work together more effectively.

    I like his agenda as well:

    In this short and sweet 45-60 minute no cost webinar we will show:

    · An Overview of OneNote

    · Organizing your Notes within OneNote

    · Type Anywhere / Autosave

    · Taking Screen Clippings

    · Integration with Outlook

    · Sending Notes in Various Formats

    · Auto Table Creation

    · Tagging Notes and Creating Note Summary Reports

    · Live Note Sharing/Editing Sessions

    · Searching Notes and Within Images

    · Performing Math Calculations on the fly

    · OneNote Etiquette

    · Integrating OneNote and SharePoint

    · Creating Shared Notebooks in WSS

    · Searching OneNote files in SharePoint

    · What's coming in OneNote 2010

    · Review and answer questions for workshop attendees

    It’s free and tomorrow (7/31) at 12noon Eastern, register here: http://www.captaretraining.com/CourseDetails.aspx?CourseID=643de62b-0693-4f37-aa58-0944e0a99a8c&StartDate=7/31/2009

    Hopefully this will be available afterwards so even if you can’t make it tomorrow you can watch it later.  Thanks for the pointer Malcolm!

  • Engineering OneNote Blog

    What a great first week please keep the feedback coming!

    • 2 Comments

    I can’t believe the tech preview has been out for over a week already!  On behalf of all of the Devs, Testers, & PMs on the OneNote team thank you for testing out the next release of OneNote and Office.  Your feedback, input and bugs are incredibly valuable to us.

    On our team we have always tried to have a connection with our customers by listening to them and engaging you all as much as possible.  We are reading the newsgroups, reading the blog posts you all say about OneNote and even John setup a Twitter feed for us (I personally love this).  Now that we have released the Office 2010 Technical Preview we are doing the same thing with the 2010 feedback.  We have assigned people on the team to be on duty to look over the feedback coming in through the various channels. 

    I wanted to take some time to tell you how we handle all of the feedback that you have been sending us and letting you know that we listen to everyone and try and respond/react as much as possible.  Right now we have a few feedback channels available: Send a Smile (SAS), Newsgroups, blogs and blog comments.  Send a Smile is the little application installed along with the tech preview which lets you send a smile or a frown to us regarding something you saw.  There is an excellent post on the Office 2010 Engineering blog about Send a Smile.  Since we have released the tech preview there have been 300+ smiles&frowns sent to us and we look through each one.  We look for bugs, send interesting feedback to the people who developed the feature and we keep track of it in a shared notebook (more on this later).  Secondly we have the newsgroups where there is generally more of a discussion going on regarding various features.  The newsgroups are a bit less automated but allows us to have more dialog with everyone and I hope our responses in the newsgroup is useful we love seeing what you have to say.  Finally we look over some of the blog posts talking about OneNote 2010 and of course any comments on our websites we look at.

    As you can see we have a lot of feedback coming in and I wanted to tell you about how we use a OneNote shared notebook to keep track of it all.  We have a notebook stored on SharePoint where we have a bunch project details and in there I have a “ON2010 TechPreview” section which is organised into weekly roll-ups  where we track all of the feedback from people like you.  Also Alex had a great suggestion that we use the Linked Note Taking feature so whenever I copy & paste someone’s details from the SAS website there is a direct link back to their feedback (which may include a screen shot, their email, etc).  Having this one place in a shared notebook is great and everyone can see what you all are saying.  We also send the roll-up via email to everyone on the team and send out a link so people can view it in the notebook.  It is a great use of shared notebooks, web research with linked note taking and unread & author sharing. 

    So please keep sending the feedback and letting us know what you think, we are listening and we value your opinion!

  • Engineering OneNote Blog

    OneNote Afterglow - “I love you OneNote”

    • 2 Comments

    I just saw this video was on YouTube and I had to share.  Note that this might not be safe for work (NSFW) so just a word of caution, no swearing or nudity just an “adult situation” : )  I hope you enjoy it as much as I did!

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ny4UBuCri08

    What did you all think? 

  • Engineering OneNote Blog

    Freedom Writers using OneNote to write a book

    • 1 Comments

    Looking to work with a bunch of people over large distances to create something?  Use OneNote!  Today at the National Educational Computing Conference Erin Gruwell the founder of the Freedom Writers Foundation gave a keynote where she talked about how the Freedom Writers used OneNote to collaborate and write a book.  Here’s the PR speak stuff:

    WASHINGTON, July 1 /PRNewswire/ -- Although teachers collaborate on lesson plans and projects across schools and districts every day, the Freedom Writers Foundation has proven that the power of technology enables this across time zones and even various levels of technology familiarity. The Foundation brought together 150 teachers from across the United States and Canada to jointly compose their new book Teaching Hope: Stories from the Freedom Writers Teachers, (Broadway Books, August 2009) with the help of donated tools and support from HP and Microsoft Corp. Today, in her keynote presentation at the National Educational Computing Conference, Erin Gruwell, founder of the Freedom Writers Foundation, will share the supporting, yet critical role, that technology played in easing the teacher/author collaboration, relationship building and ultimately impacting change.

    "Thanks to technology, our 150 teachers have successfully authored and completed a new book that is sure to have a lasting impact on today's and tomorrow's teachers," said Gruwell. "We couldn't have collaboratively composed and edited the book without HP's and Microsoft's involvement, ongoing support and training, which allowed us to write, edit and virtually collaborate, anytime and anywhere, as if we were all sitting in the same room."

    Collaborating with technology

    The Freedom Writers Teachers came together last summer as part of the Foundation's teacher-training program, spurred on by the success of Paramount Pictures' "Freedom Writers," starring Hilary Swank, based on the book The Freedom Writers Diary, by Gruwell and her students. The teachers, representing fresh approaches to "teaching hope" from all school settings and geographies, received the donated tools and training as they commenced writing their personal classroom stories featured in the new book.

    Staying connected with the HP Mini and Microsoft Office OneNote 2007, allowed the teachers to access information, collaborate in real time, and communicate via e-mail, IM, and blogging with the integrated wireless technologies. Office OneNote 2007 (www.iheartonenote.com) is a "digital notebook" that provides people one place to gather notes, audio and visual information, powerful search to find what they are looking for quickly, and easy-to-use shared notebooks to manage information and work together more effectively.

    "Given the immense inequity in skills and access to technology going into writing this book, we were worried true collaboration would be next to impossible," said Zachary Chase, a Freedom Writers Teacher. "Our new tools leveled the field for technophobic and technophilic teachers alike. We were able to work together across a common platform. I hope this unified and connected spirit comes through for everyone who reads Teaching Hope."

    Applying technology lessons learned in the classroom

    Beyond the book, some of the Freedom Writers Teachers are also using this technology in their classrooms and to share with colleagues across their districts. This next school term, Christine Neuner, a Freedom Writers Teacher, plans to use Office OneNote 2007 to give students a chance to send drafts of their works for peer-editing.

    "I think it is imperative for the students to use such technology at the high school level because they will be using similar technology in post-secondary schools and training," said Neuner. "They will have to be technologically prepared for the workplace as well. Using OneNote is just another way for me to help prepare them for the future."

    The HP Mini can change how K-12 children learn today and is the practical answer to one-to-one computing. Students can learn collaboration, problem solving and creative skills, which will prepare them for life after school. With the right technology, students learn to communicate effectively with multimedia and think critically as they decide how to present knowledge effectively - giving them a bigger voice in the world.

    Teaching Hope: Stories from the Freedom Writers Teachers will be available for sale on August 18, 2009 wherever books are sold. Teaching Hope unites the voices of these Freedom Writer teachers, who share uplifting, devastating, and poignant stories from their classrooms, stories that provide insight into the struggles and triumphs of education in all of its forms. Mirroring an academic year, these dispatches from the front lines of education take us from the anticipation of the first day to the disillusionment, challenges, and triumphs of the school year. These are the voices of teachers who persevere in the face of intolerance, rigid administration, and countless other challenges, and continue to reach out and teach those who are deemed unteachable. Their stories inspire everyone to make a difference in the world around them.

    About The Freedom Writers Foundation

    The Freedom Writers Foundation provides educators with transformative methods to engage, enlighten and empower vulnerable, at-risk students to reach their full potential. For more information, please visit www.freedomwritersfoundation.org.

    Website: http://www.freedomwritersfoundation.org

    Pretty cool if you ask me and also cool to be part of a product which has press releases!

    Anyhow Mike’s OneNote & Education blog has some more details.

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