DLLs: Create an Abstract Class the Derive a Class

DLLs: Create an Abstract Class the Derive a Class

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We aren’t quite at the point where we can use DLLs, but we need to take a look at the concept of the abstract class and how to derive or construct the abstract class, you can derive or construct a “concrete” class as well, but that is usually well defined. 

An abstract class is a class that has to be derived or constructed by another class, it can’t instantiated by itself like a concrete class is able to.  This shows the C# approach, apologies to the Visual Basic reader.  Please feel free to add a comment with the VB approach.

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Next blog, we will go over how to implement the abstract class, use it in the Derived Class.

 

If you want to get a head start, go to: How to: Define Abstract Properties.  Make sure to check the comments at the end of the article, there is a documentation bug and the comment fixes it.  The article assumes you know how to use the Visual Studio command line to compile.  Command line compiles are very useful, but can be tricky, I will cover this later.

You will see where this is going from the point of view of games, in fact this is very important stuff.  For XNA, F# and Silverlight games.

Heading to UCI for Senior Project Day!  June 10, 2009

Oh yeah, make sure to try Bing!

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