Death by HTML 5, timeline

Death by HTML 5, timeline

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Death by HTML5

It’s the Silverlight versus HTML5 and what should you do about which to learn.  I am hedging my bets on Silverlight since it is easier to develop with than Flex, and I work for Microsoft.  In this economy it is nice to have work, and you might be between jobs, if you are things will improve and I want to be there for you, but since I am just crappy blogger, there isn’t much I can do is there?  Ok, there is a little bit, one of the things I can do is not give bad advice. 

HTML 5 is often overly reported as:

  • Here is a well written and must read link:
  • Interview with one of the HTML 5 specification reviewers, from 2008 but an interesting read, and makes the point that HTML 5 specification is not final till 2022, let me write that again: 2022, see this article for the timeline:
  • Where do you go for the most current information:
  • Microsoft has an internal commitment to building standards based tools and technologies, this means that HTML 5 is the standard to use, so logically it means that Microsoft is going to make a big play to HTML 5.
  • For now, the Platform development for Windows Phone 7 is using Silverlight and XNA with VB.NET or C#, this is true in the released version of WP7 and the Mango version.
    • <<My opininon and no one has told me otherwise>>
      • If you have heard rumors that C++ will another language that can be used for a future version of WP7 or WP V-Next, I wouldn’t make the assumption that you will be able use unmanaged code. 
      • Keep in mind that you can force C++ development to only use managed code with a switch.

Is the timeline for HTML 5, so the “candidate recommendation will be in 2012”

  • First W3C Working Draft in October 2007.
  • Last Call Working Draft in October 2009.
  • Call for contributions for the test suite in 2011.
  • Candidate Recommendation in 2012.
  • First draft of test suite in 2012.
  • Second draft of test suite in 2015.
  • Final version of test suite in 2019.
  • Reissued Last Call Working Draft in 2020.
  • Proposed Recommendation in 2022.
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  • Please add 7 and 5 and type the answer here:
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  • Then why did Microsoft choose HTML5 over Silverlight for its OS?

  • Developer, as always, thank you for your comment, here is my answer:

    I assume that you mean why did Microsoft choose HTML5 for direct installation in the default install of "V-Next" and only have Silverlight as a download.  At this time I am not going to guess at the answer, it will be revealed at Build.  

    However, let's look at Windows 7, and ask this question:

    Is Silverlight something that you have to download and install with a default Windows installation?  

    To answer, Silverlight is part of the browser installation and not the O/S.

    As to the "V-Next" O/S, when HTML 5 is installed is a question someone else at Microsoft would need to answer, Windows 7 installations I understand, but Windows "V-Next", I don't know and I have other technology focuses.

    For both of us, we should consider attending one of the number of HTML 5 Code Camps that are held from time to time (see blogs.msdn.com/dorischen).

    Right now I am focused on Silverlight and after researching the answer to your question, I am more confident about Silverlight then before you ask.

    Silverlight will continue to be a way to develop for multi-platform O/S and browsers.  Perhaps, over time it may be be pushed out of the way by HTML 5.  

    Finally, keep in mind of the timeline shown in my blog:

    ===> HTML 5 specification won't be final till 2022.

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