Virtualization is virtually important for your developer virtual skills, really

Virtualization is virtually important for your developer virtual skills, really

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Ok, why should you know about virtualization as a developer?  Especially if you are a game developer?  Well you could get laid off, no, the job you are working on will eventually end, you will get tired of it or the company just gets tired of the work you are doing (not necessarily you though) and you will need to think about other opportunities.  In the future, virtualization will likely come up in interviews, etc.

Bear in mind, in any Software Architecture job, the way your product is delivered to your customers is via the Infrastructure, and in the real world the IT folks rule the way your product goes to market.  If you don’t understand virtualization, then you may miss out on opportunities in your life.

Over coffee or tea today, read one of the blogs listed.  Then tomorrow read another, and then in six days you will have read all 6 of the blogs and have a better understanding of how virtualization applies to you, and how the IT folks deal with it.  Normally software types don’t give a hoot about certifications, but the IT folks do.  It is likely that an IT person is on your review cycle or in an interview loop, if you understand them better, then you will show “empathy” and that is an important skill.  Having one of these exams on your resume, could differentiate you from your competition.

Harold Wong, has written about his experience with studying and taking not only the Microsoft Virtualization Exams (no class required) and the VMWare exams (which require that you take their class before taking the certification exam, a $3500 5-Day certification class), you can see this blog at.

Chris Avis, has a series of blog entries that cover why you as a developer should do virtualization, and I would recommend preparing and taking the exams if you want to move up in any IT or Software Architecture hierarchy, at least the lower cost Microsoft Virtualization Exams.

Check out the blog series at his blog!

Passing the Windows Server 2008 R2, Server Virtualization Exam (70-659) – Part 1 – Study Resources

Passing the Windows Server 2008 R2, Server Virtualization Exam (70-659) – Part 2 – Skills Measured

Passing the Windows Server 2008 R2, Server Virtualization Exam (70-659) – Part 3 – Installing and Configuring Host and Parent Settings

Passing the Windows Server 2008 R2, Server Virtualization Exam (70-659) – Part 4 – Creating and Configuring Guest VM’s

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! This ONE is the one to read if you are a developer  !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Passing the Windows Server 2008 R2, Server Virtualization Exam (70-659) – Part 5 – I’m a Developer! Why Virtualize?

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  • Virtualization is very good for testing purposes. Can use templates for creating new environments immediately and do any required changes. If something goes wrong, Can use snapshot to revert back to the previous stage.

    For a software application developer, doing any tweak on a physical server is difficult. If something goes wrong, need to bang our heads on the monitor.

    Thanks for the resources.

  • Arun,

    This is one of the best written comments that I have ever received.  Thank you very much.

    I think that developers, especially me, do not appreciate the importance of virtualization.

    You are awesome!

    Sam

  • Hey Thanks Sam,

    Myself as a developer, I too dint appreciate it much until recently.

    It really is a Time-Machine in our hands. Virtually, makes you feel like God :)

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