Not a technical blog about how to organize ones and zeros.  But it is a an important blog about the state of affairs in the US.  According to another blog:

http://blogs.technet.com/b/inside_microsoft_research/archive/2014/04/24/hacking-women-helping-women.aspx

Rane Johnson-Stempson used an older document from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and her source appears to be this article: http://tinyurl.com/kcyynqf (it’s a PDF file) and it states:

By 2018, predicts the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1.4 million technology jobs in the United States will be unfilled. At current rates for issuance of computer-science degrees, only 61 percent of those openings will be filled—and just 29 percent of the applicants for those will be women.

Couple of points here, this referencing article was written in 2008, the current BLS surveys are created anew every 4 years, so the latest baseline was created in 2012 go out to 2022, and the predictions have changed.  After all, 6 years of working to get more people into technology must have yielded some results, right?  And indeed they have: Salaries remain high and the number of women appear to be declining in the software roles by some people’s analysis, and if you ask me, if there is any growth in women in software, it is a very weak growth. 

If you want to see the latest number, then take a look at this page for the salaries, where to locate for work and so forth.  Job projections are for other writers not me, here is the data from May 2013, keep in mind that the data has to be crunched by the BLS, so here it is  for you: