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  • Blog Post: WF4 instance state size is smaller than WF3

    Part of the performance enhancements made in WF4 are in the size of the workflow instance state. There are a number of contributing design decisions: Separation of workflow definition from workflow instance - I like to think of this as the separation of a class and an object. WF3 keeps the workflow...
  • Blog Post: Workflow performance tips: long-running custom activities

    Custom activities that perform long-running work can affect workflow performance in unexpected ways. Understanding WF's threading model and scheduler can help activity authors make informed decisions about their code. This post intends to shed some light on the negative performance impact when a custom...
  • Blog Post: Workflow performance tips: custom CacheMetadata

    When writing custom activities for WF4, the latest revision of Windows Workflow, new to the .Net 4.0 Framework, you can cut some performance costs by overriding the CacheMetadata method. By default, CacheMetadata will use reflection to determine what properties are available as in/out arguments and setup...
  • Blog Post: Slow AppFabric demo part two

    In the previous article, we began analyzing the first portion of the timeline, which is where IIS starts up the process. In this, I pointed out that 16% of the sampled time was spent in page faults. Sampling does not always give us the whole story though. If the process is switched out, then samples...
  • Blog Post: Slow AppFabric demo part one

    Back in the early days of AppFabric, when it was still just Dublin and Velocity, a demo was given to the management team that started with a simple xamlx workflow. You can probably imagine the concern as a room full of managers silently waited for this very simple workflow to come up. The reports vary...
  • Blog Post: VirtualPathProvider

    In .Net 3.5, WF services were introduced making it easier to host workflows as services. With the send and receive activities, a workflow can be used instead of coding a service by hand. The common way to expose workflows as services is to place the .svc/.xoml or .xamlx files and supporting libraries...
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