Blog - Title

  • .NET Blog

    CLR 4: Making the AssemblyResolve event more useful

    • 2 Comments
    In the introductory post on CLR Binder (‘ Understanding the Binder – Part 1 ’), we listed the set of steps that the CLR Binder follows, in order to locate an assembly and bind to it. On reading this, an obvious question comes to mind. What happens when...
  • .NET Blog

    Enabling CAS Policy Compatibility Mode for a Project

    • 1 Comments
    If you’re migrating a VS project over to VS 2010 Beta1 and you are calling code that is passing Evidence objects to the runtime expecting security policy resolution, or if you’re using a permission Deny , you may run into the following exception: NotSupportedException...
  • .NET Blog

    Getting more information than the exception class provides

    • 9 Comments
    We recently had a question about how to get more information than an exception’s type provides. The developer was trying to copy a file and didn’t know why the copy was failing. File copies can fail for many reasons, almost all of them what Eric Lippert...
  • .NET Blog

    Tail Call Improvements in .Net Framework 4

    • 1 Comments
    Grant Richins has a post on the CLR Code Generation team blog that covers the work done to improve the x64 JIT to honor the "tail." instruction prefix, thereby making functional languages like F# more viable. You can find the full post here .
  • .NET Blog

    What's New for .Net Framework Security

    • 1 Comments
    Shawn Farkas, CLR security developer, has started a cool series of posts on what’s new in .NET Framework 4 security. If you’re doing any work with or have scenarios involving partially trusted code, you’ll want to take a look. Topics include sandboxing...
  • .NET Blog

    New Security Model: Moving to a Better Sandbox

    • 9 Comments
    For .Net Framework 4, we decided to remove the dependency on caspol and the policy levels and make things simpler. With this change, the default grant-set for assemblies is now FullTrust unless the host (such as InternetExplorer) decides to load them...
  • .NET Blog

    In-Process Side by Side Part 2 - Common in-proc SxS scenarios

    • 6 Comments
    Update: The information in this blog post applies to pre beta-1 behavior and is not applicable to beta 2 and RTM. We will have more posts and documentation on this subject as we get closer to RTM. This section covers the most common in-process side...
  • .NET Blog

    In-Process Side by Side (Part1)

    • 17 Comments
    One of the new features in CLR 4 is In-Process Side-by-side (Inproc SxS) – a feature that lets you use multiple versions of .NET in the same process. For applications that use add-ins (particularly COM add-ins), in-proc SxS lets us provide a level of...
  • .NET Blog

    Improvements to NGen in CLR 4

    • 0 Comments
    Surupa Biswas has a post in the CodeGen team blog on new features in NGen coming out as part of CLR 4. The post covers NGen SxS (that's side-by-side) and multi-proc NGen, and goes into detail on the work that went into making Targeted Patching possible...
  • .NET Blog

    Tail Call Improvements in CLR 4

    • 0 Comments
    Now that .Net 4 Beta1 is out, you'll see a number of posts on this blog covering new CLR features in CLR 4. Grant Richins, a developer on our team, wrote a post on tail call improvements in CLR 4 at the CLR Code Generation blog . The post deals with...
  • .NET Blog

    The Conditional Weak Table: Enabling Dynamic Object Properties

    • 3 Comments
    The Dynamic Language Runtime allows you to implement a dynamic language (such as Ruby or Python) on top of the CLR. There are a lot of challenges to making everything work right. One particularly difficult aspect was enabling Ruby to attach arbitrary...
  • .NET Blog

    Why is AppDomain.AppendPrivatePath Obsolete?

    • 13 Comments
    This is the first in a series of posts where we discuss the reasoning behind “obsoleting” specific APIs. If you use AppDomain.AppendPrivatePath , or look at MSDN , you’ll notice it’s obsolete.  This frustrates people because the alternative suggested...
  • .NET Blog

    How CLR maps SEH exceptions to managed exception types

    • 6 Comments
    Managed exception handling is built on Windows OS’s Structured Exception Handling , commonly referred to as SEH (to learn more about SEH, please read Matt Pietrek’s excellent article first). This implies that CLR understands how to interoperate between...
  • .NET Blog

    ThreadPool improvements in CLR v4.0

    • 1 Comments
    Eric Eilebrecht , a developer on our team, has just started a multi-part series on TheadPool improvements in the upcoming CLR v4.0. The first post is pretty fascinating and begins with a brief introduction on thread pools and it's design. The post deals...
  • .NET Blog

    ThreadAbortException

    • 2 Comments
    System.Threading.ThreadAbortException is just plain weird. For instance, most exceptions happen because of something code did on its own thread: even asynchronous exceptions are caused by something your code did on the current thread. (Note for the nitpickers...
  • .NET Blog

    Exceptions out of Fault/Finally

    • 14 Comments
    Assumption: This write-up assumes that you are familiar with the managed exception handling constructs (e.g. catch, filter, fault, finally). If not, you may want to read this and also refer to the CLI specification . Managed exception handling exposes...
  • .NET Blog

    New TlbImp Release on CodePlex - Full Customization of Interop Assemblies

    • 7 Comments
    It has been a few months since our last release of TlbImp on CodePlex. We recently released a new version of TlbImp – please visit the Codeplex page for this tool to find out more. In this release, we’ve introduced two major features: 1. Ruled-based...
  • .NET Blog

    Resource Manager and .Net Interaction with ServiceControlManager

    • 0 Comments
    Kim Hamilton has a couple of excellent posts on the BCL Team blog . In the first post on Working with the ResourceManager , Kim talks about the basics of resource generation, constructing a ResourceManager and how resource fallback works. The post also...
  • .NET Blog

    Why catch(Exception)/empty catch is bad

    • 69 Comments
    You’ve seen the advice before— it’s not a good programming practice to catch System.Exception . Because managed exceptions are hierarchical, catching the top of the hierarchy—e.g., catch(Exception)—is an easy way to make sure that you catch all exceptions...
  • .NET Blog

    Catch, Rethrow and Filters - Why you should care?

    • 52 Comments
    A very common pattern in the usage of managed exception handling is that of catching an exception, inspecting it's type and rethrowing it once you realize it was not the exception you wanted to handle. Below is such an example (and should be avoided in...
  • .NET Blog

    Understanding the Binder – Part 1

    • 68 Comments
    This is an introductory post on the internals of CLR Binder. What does the Binder do? CLR's Binder is a piece of code that, when given an assembly name, determines where the assembly is and binds to it. So how does the Binder locate assemblies...
Page 6 of 6 (146 items) «23456