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Windows Communication Foundation From the Inside

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  • Blog Post: Parsing Standard Uris, Part 2

    Here's another look at defining what it means to have a URI for the TCP or named pipe transports. You can compare these definitions to the version I gave yesterday using the parser syntax flags. I'll only cover the net.tcp URI scheme as the two are almost identical except for the use of ports. What...
  • Blog Post: Parsing Standard Uris

    The System.Uri class has built-in parsing rules for a variety of schemes, including http, https, file, ftp, gopher, mailto, news, nntp, telnet, and ldap. There are also parsers for the WCF net.tcp and net.pipe schemes. These parsing rules allow a uri using the scheme to be recognized, broken into its...
  • Blog Post: Frequently Asked Uri Questions

    The System.Net team has put together a list of frequently asked questions for the System.Uri class that they're responsible for. The Uri is one of the few types that we use quite extensively in the programming model for WCF but don't implement ourselves. There are a small number of features that have...
  • Blog Post: Some History of the Named Pipe, Part 4

    Here are the past articles in the series to get up to date: Some History of the Named Pipe, Part 1 (Unix pipes) Some History of the Named Pipe, Part 2 (Unix fifo) Some History of the Named Pipe, Part 3 (Windows named pipe) The last part in this series is to bring the history of the...
  • Blog Post: Some History of the Named Pipe, Part 3

    Some History of the Named Pipe, Part 1 (Unix pipes) Some History of the Named Pipe, Part 2 (Unix fifo) Some History of the Named Pipe, Part 3 (Windows named pipe) Some History of the Named Pipe, Part 4 (WCF named pipe) In earlier parts we looked at the anonymous pipe...
  • Blog Post: Some History of the Named Pipe, Part 2

    Some History of the Named Pipe, Part 1 (Unix pipes) Some History of the Named Pipe, Part 2 (Unix fifo) Some History of the Named Pipe, Part 3 (Windows named pipe) Some History of the Named Pipe, Part 4 (WCF named pipe) The anonymous pipes that I talked about last...
  • Blog Post: Some History of the Named Pipe, Part 1

    Some History of the Named Pipe, Part 1 (Unix pipes) Some History of the Named Pipe, Part 2 (Unix fifo) Some History of the Named Pipe, Part 3 (Windows named pipe) Some History of the Named Pipe, Part 4 (WCF named pipe) Let’s start with the more ancient history and...
  • Blog Post: Windows API Code Pack V1 Released

    Going along with Windows 7, the final version of the Windows API Code Pack was released last week. The code pack is a way to provide access to Windows features that lack a managed interface in the framework today, primarily for things added in Windows Vista and Windows 7. For example, the code pack adds...
  • Blog Post: What Will Be New in Networking for Beta 2

    The NCL team has released their list of new networking features for .Net framework 4 beta 2 . A partial summary of the features is: Opening socket connections using the DNS name of the machine Opening socket connections for IPv4 and IPv6 simultaneously Using SSL for authentication only ...
  • Blog Post: Finding Free Ports, Part 2

    Yesterday I talked about the algorithm the TCP transport uses to reserve a unique port when listening on both IPv4 and IPv6 addreses is enabled for a service. Why are the random port numbers drawn from the range 49152-65535? Because that’s the range the operating system uses for dynamic port allocations...
  • Blog Post: Finding Free Ports

    One of the options for the listen URI for the TCP transport is to let the transport make the address unique by filling in details such as the port number. The socket API allows specifying a wildcard port but at the time WCF was written the wildcard port option could only be used with a single IP version...
  • Blog Post: Advanced Debugging for Network Development

    Two new screencast videos on Channel 9 come from the Windows Protocol team demonstrating Network Monitor and other debugging tools. The videos are of sessions at an event for Windows protocol licensees a few weeks ago so the intended audience is primarily developers trying to build interoperable protocol...
  • Blog Post: Network Monitor 3.3 Released

    A new release of the Network Monitor tool for capturing and analyzing network traffic is available. Added features include improved support for running inside virtualized environments and a plugin system for installing analysis modules that filter and parse captured protocol data. A complete list of...
  • Blog Post: 40 Years of RFC

    Yesterday marked the 40th anniversary of RFC 1 published by Steve Crocker at UCLA and covering host software for processing messages. The contents are forgettable but signify the start of an initiative that has broadly impacted how network standards are shared. Here's a look at some other historical...
  • Blog Post: Guests Not Welcome

    I recently encountered an annoyance while trying to build a low-privileged web service client: calling IPAddress.Parse with a low-privileged account (for example, a guest account) blows up. This is because the Parse function unconditionally initializes some shared settings, including a few performance...
  • Blog Post: Network Monitor 3.3 Beta

    A new beta release of Network Monitor is available on Connect. Network Monitor is a tool for tracing and analyzing network traffic that's particularly useful at capturing wire data for WCF applications. You can get details about the new features in Network Monitor 3.3 on the Network Monitor blog.
  • Blog Post: Introduction to Ad Hoc Discovery

    Jesus Rodriguez has a description of WS-Discovery that covers examples in WCF 4.0 for ad hoc discovery networks. Ad hoc discovery is the approach that uses broadcast messages to publish and discover resources on the network. The other approach, managed discovery, uses a centralized service to coordinate...
  • Blog Post: February Free Book Offer

    The February edition of the free Microsoft book of the month includes a downloadable version of the Windows Vista Resource Kit , which you might find interesting if you're looking for details about the new features in Windows Vista. There's no reason to get this book if you're just interested in managed...
  • Blog Post: Message Framing, Part 7

    The almost last article in the series is a bit of data and roundup to catch a few miscellaneous topics. There's been some interest in working through a few example messages so I may do a later part or two later for that. Past entries that you should have read by now: Next Week, a Series Message...
  • Blog Post: Message Framing, Part 6

    Past entries that you should have read by now: Next Week, a Series Message Framing, Part 1 Message Framing, Part 2 Message Framing, Part 3 Message Framing, Part 4 Message Framing, Part 5 I've so far only talked about what happens when things go right when messages are exchanged...
  • Blog Post: Message Framing, Part 5

    Past entries that you should have read by now: Next Week, a Series Message Framing, Part 1 Message Framing, Part 2 Message Framing, Part 3 Message Framing, Part 4 With the preamble exchange out of the way, it is now time to send some data. As before...
  • Blog Post: Message Framing, Part 4

    Past entries that you should have read by now: Next Week, a Series Message Framing, Part 1 Message Framing, Part 2 Message Framing, Part 3 After the message encoding is communicated, the framing protocol starts to diverge based on the mode record that was provided. In the modes used...
  • Blog Post: Message Framing, Part 3

    Past entries that you should have read by now: Next Week, a Series Message Framing, Part 1 Message Framing, Part 2 The next record at the start of every legal exchange in the framing format is a message encoding record. The message encoding specifies how the message...
  • Blog Post: Message Framing, Part 2

    Although there are a several different legal sequences of records in the framing format, the first few records are always the same after first establishing a connection. The first record describes the version of the framing protocol, the second record describes the mode of the framing protocol, the third...
  • Blog Post: Message Framing, Part 1

    Message framing is the breaking up of a stream of data into demarcated units called messages. Some protocols, such as HTTP, natively include a notion of message framing. Other protocols, such as TCP, don't natively include a notion of message framing and need to be augmented with one to be used in a...
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