statcounter tracker
Education pricing for Kinect for Windows - Education - Site Home - MSDN Blogs
The Education Blog
Ray Fleming's take on what's interesting in Education IT in Australia

Education pricing for Kinect for Windows

Home      Content index      Case studies      Windows 8 Education Apps      RSS feed       About

Education pricing for Kinect for Windows

  • Comments 1

I am one of the latest of the 18 million people who’ve bought a Kinect sensor for my Xbox (one of the Microsoft CES announcements - the 18m number, not the fact that I’m a user) 

imageIt seems I’m a laggard when it comes to gaming and home entertainment technology, having only just setup my Xbox and bought a Kinect this Christmas. The two things I’ve discovered and never used before, is the voice control feature, and the ABC iView app on my Xbox, which means that we can now watch catch-up TV on our TV, rather than having to watch it on a laptop computer. So over the holiday the whole family have become re-addicted to Spooks. I feel silly not having set this up before, because I’d thought of it as a gaming box, rather than a home entertainment system.

Anyway, just as I’m catching up with Kinect on the Xbox, the world has shifted again with the CES announcement of Kinect for Windows. From the outside, the sensor looks the same, and works in the same way, giving you control over your computer via your hand and body movements, but unlike the Xbox version, it’s now optimised for close-up use - from 50cm away rather than having to stand a couple of metres away. That means that it will allow people to use Kinect while they are sitting in front of a desktop setup.

What we’ve announced is that this new Kinect sensor hardware and software will be available from the 1st February, and it’s been priced at AU$299. The even better news is that later this year there will also be special education pricing for Kinect for Windows, bringing the price down (I don't have an Australian price yet, but in the US it's planned to come down to $149). You can read all the details on the Kinect for Windows blog here.

Because Kinect is able to do full body tracking, and now has it’s new ‘near’ mode, I can imagine a heap of scenarios that it will be useful for in education:

  • Replacing interactive whiteboards with a Kinect, to reduce the hardware cost and allow more to spent on teaching resources
  • Giving special needs students the ability to interact in new ways with IT, without needing to use the keyboard or a mouse
  • Creating simulations - eg science  experiments - where students are able to control virtual equipment and manipulate them

imageWith the education pricing for Kinect around the corner, I guess the KinectEDucation community is going to get even busier in the near future, with teachers and developers collaborating on new teaching and learning ideas for Kinect.

  • Where can you buy the Kinect for Windows (education price) in Australia?

Page 1 of 1 (1 items)
Leave a Comment
  • Please add 1 and 5 and type the answer here:
  • Post