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Microsoft Bring Your Own Device in Schools whitepaper

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Microsoft Bring Your Own Device in Schools whitepaper

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BYOD in schools whitepaperThere's been a lot said about Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) in schools, and plenty of commentary on blogs and the Twittersphere. It's a fast-moving subject, almost like 'building airplanes in the sky' – it sometimes feels like BYOD strategies and vision are being created as we go along.

And the debate has been joined by two pedagogical leaders who have produced a Microsoft BYOD whitepaper for schools. Bruce Dixon (from the Anytime, Anywhere Learning Foundation) and Sean Tierney (from the worldwide Microsoft Partners in Learning programme) have both been passionate advocates for 1:1 learning programmes for many years, and have just published their first 'Bring Your Own Device for schools' whitepaper. The aim is to examine the potential deployment models from teaching, learning and IT management perspectives.

As their introduction says:

 

The ongoing debate regarding the Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) model in schools warrants deeper analysis to help educators and institutions understand this provisioning model and its potential benefits and pitfalls for learning. This discussion paper sets out to investigate the myths and understand which questions should be addressed when considering allowing students to bring their own devices, and which option might be best suited to a school or system’s culture. It is intended to stimulate discussion around what constitutes best practice 1-to-1 learning.

 

As well as plenty of detailed analysis and debate within the white paper, there's also a handy table that helps to describe the different capabilities of the various devices that are available for a BYOD scenario:

BYOD Capability Taxonomy - from page 5

It's a great way to classify the differing capabilities across a range of current and future devices.

I think that one of the best aspects of the white paper is that it talks about the alternative models – presenting five potential models, and discussed the benefits and considerations of each. It also goes into five key questions to ask to help you decide whether a BYOD model is right for your school. And then talks through consideration for planning and implementation procedures.

The conclusion section starts:

 

BYOD is a trend that needs to be carefully examined in an education context to ensure that the models we deploy are successful. At the heart of good 1-to-1 learning is equity to ensure that all students have equal access to technology-rich experiences, and simplicity to ensure that it is easy to manage and sustain.

 

and finishes with an absolutely key point:

 

Schools need to be vigilant and protective of the foundations of equity of access on which all of our education systems are firmly founded. With this in mind, all stakeholders – teachers, parents, students and principals – need to work through the tough decisions early to drive home the best outcomes for all students at all times.

 

Learn MoreYou can either download the BYOD for schools whitepaper, or if you're in Australia, drop Richard Ryan an email and he'll pop a couple of printed copies in the post

For more info on Bring Your Own Device, here's a link to related BYOD articles

  • A bit embarrassing that 'note taking with digital pens' would be classified as 'advanced pedagogical potential'. Maybe someone should introduce the authors to Blooms Taxonomy...

  • If the diagram is indicative of the content of the whitepaper then I think you need to make it clear that it reflects your thinking on devices, not a true pedagogical taxonomy.

    For example, iPad apps are extremely versatile, can be used with stylii, can be used for programming, can be used for video creation/editing (a particular strength, in fact), does recognize Chinese characters hand drawn, does have speech input and so on and so on.

    Perhaps when the Surface tablet is released, this diagram will change?

  • As Richard Jones mention the diagram is clearly inaccurate and the bias is to push a full MS Laptop designed program. I advise replacing this content with an honest comparison or else it should be removed.

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