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My current computer–why I've switched to a Samsung slate

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My current computer–why I've switched to a Samsung slate

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Each working day I spend between 5 and 8 hours working with my current computer. And it was only last week I realised my setup was quite different to everybody else, as I looked around the meeting table. Almost everybody else was using a laptop, whereas I've made the leap from laptop PC to slate PC permanently. So I thought I'd share it with you:

My regular computer: Samsung Series 7 slate PC

Samsung Series 7 slateUp until May I was using an HP laptop – which I was very happy with. Good performance, nice graphics, and plenty of storage etc. And because I thought of myself as a power-user, I didn't think I'd be able to cope with a less powerful computer – and that seemed to include all the early slate PCs, which were good to demo with, but not something I'd considered as my every day PC.

But then I got my hands on a Samsung Series 7 Slate PC with all the bells and whistles I needed, and I'm running it with the released version of Windows 8. The one I've got (the sexily named XE700T1A-A05AU) has all the key ingredients I wanted:

  • A touch display: You know, I never imagined I'd be making this the No. 1 requirement, but ever since I moved to Windows 8, it's a must have – especially when I'm sitting at home on the sofa, or taking it into meetings
  • A pen: just like touch, it's now a 'must have', as I take it to meetings and use it as a slate, and am using OneNote more and more for notes, as well as using handwriting recognition instead of an on-screen keyboard
  • Plenty of storage: this one's got a 128GB SSD drive
    I've found that for me 100GB is the minimum drive, because I cart a lot of videos and presentations around with me, and whilst I've got them backed up in the cloud, I have that synced to my computer so that I can always get to them when I'm offline.
  • Decent graphics: this one has got onboard Intel graphics which are good enough for me for everything but games.
  • TPM chip: which means my drive is fully encrypted, so that all of the professional and personal data is secure if I lose it or somebody else gets their hand on it
  • Plenty of RAM: this one's got 4GB of RAM, which I'm finding is more than enough with Windows 8
  • A small dock: Whenever I'm standing or sitting at a desk, then I plug it into a dock. Which gives turns it completely into a laptop – with keyboard, mouse, second monitor and wired network connection
  • It's light: weighing in at under a kilogram
  • It's got a SIM slot, for internet on the go: Although I haven't actually used it, as I tend to just use the Internet sharing of my Lumia 800 – it means I use the data included with my normal phone subscription, rather than to have a second mobile subscription for my computer. Which means I'm always using the WiFi connection, whether that's at the office, at home, or out and about.

Here's my typical desktop setup, with a second monitor plugged into the docking station, and a normal desktop keyboard and mouse. So it means that whenever I'm at my desk, I've got the perfect setup with a big screen, and then I can just grab it from the docking station and walk to a meeting just carrying the PC and a pen, without all the other stuff. So my bag is a lot lighter than it used to be.

Samsung Series 7 slate in a desktop setup

With this setup, I've got something that works as a great desktop computer, and then is good for carrying to meetings. And if I'm using it at home in the evenings, then I tend to use it with touch and the new Windows 8 apps (for things like reading Twitter and blogs). The portability is a big bonus in our Sydney offices, where every desk is setup as a hot desk – I can sit at any desk in the building, and there's already a large monitor, keyboard and mouse ready to go.

  • I think your setup is the way of the futures. Tablet for grab and go then a desktop dock for full size at the desk.

  • I saw a comment elsewhere this morning (on ZD Net I think) where somebody was saying "but I'll never move from my desktop computer, because I need a big screen". Which is odd, because I've always had a two (or occasionally) three screen setup on my laptop computers, even before this slate.

    Originally, with just a laptop, I'd normally close the screen and use the large screen(s) only - eg my home setup had two screens, one driven from the VGA port, and the other on a docking station (similar to the Toshiba DynaDock you see in the photo above)

    Now, with the slate, I keep both screens going at the same time, as I'm using the touch features more often, even when I've got it docked and have a keyboard and mouse

    Ray

  • Nice... something to work towards, I am still lugging around a Notebook as well as a Tablet...

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