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Ray Fleming's take on what's interesting in Education IT in Australia

  • Education

    How many ways can you use SharePoint in education?

    • 3 Comments
    Alex Pearce, is a SharePoint Most Valuable Professional (MVP) in the UK who works with education customers, and writes extensively about SharePoint in Education on his blog at BFC Networks. In this guest blog post, Alex gives some thoughts on the many ways SharePoint can make for productive learning in the classroom:
     

    There are many ways to get SharePoint 2010 in your school, whether you’re using it as part of a package from a supplier, using a hosting company to host your own SharePoint or using your EES licence to host your SharePoint internally.

    All of the successful SharePoint implementations I have seen are those that have integrated SharePoint into their daily school lives and don’t use it as just another web page that student and teachers use if they want to. There are loads of great examples of how schools use SharePoint in their school and have a 100% adoption rate but how can this be done for your environment?

    I often talk to different schools about this very subject and I split the conversation into three different sections - management, learning and social. These three can be tackled by the school one at a time or all at the same time, but each of these can help you integrate SharePoint into your school.

    Whether you are looking at going with a third party hosting solution or building your own SharePoint, consider the following and ensure you can achieve these with the solution being provided.

    Management

    Any process in your school, whether it’s the approval of staff external training, hiring of equipment from IT or keeping the staff calendar up to date it, has a process from the request to information staff of the change/approval. SharePoint can help in any of these and any other process that comes to mind. Let’s take a look at how two of these processes can be used within in SharePoint.

    • Example - A member of staff requested some Maths training
      Navigate to the CPD site on their SharePoint and click on ‘’new request’’ which opens up Microsoft Word. They fill in the request and click ‘’save’’ which saves the document back to the CPD site. In the background, SharePoint is doing its thing and has emailed a copy of CPD Request to your manager for approval. They then open their email and get a link to the document which opens up in Internet Explorer using Office Web Applications and shows them the request you have made. They are happy and so they click ‘’approve’’ in SharePoint. This sends off the email to the finance department letting them know to send a purchase order to the training provider. During this time, two other emails have also been sent, letting the Timetable Manager know that you will not be in school on that training day and therefore need to arrange cover. The other email is to let you know that your course has been approved and you can attend.

        • Example - You want to borrow some digital cameras from the ICT Support department
          Navigate to the SharePoint page they have setup. You click on ‘’digital cameras’’ which loads a page that looks similar to your Outlook calendar and look for you the time you want. You can see that another member of staff has them already booked at that time, so you decide to use them the next lesson. You have to fill out an online form that includes the date and time and the room you require them in. When you have submitted the request, an email is sent to the ICT support team who approve the request. The day arrives for you to use the cameras but you are worried you don’t know how to use them. Help is at hand. Go to the same SharePoint page the ICT Support department use to book the cameras, see that they are still booked and there is a help wiki that’s been setup on the cameras which shows you everything you need to know.

        imageLearning

        Pupils are given out worksheets all the time in class which, 9 times out of 10, are generated in Word or printed off the internet. Why give them something that can be lost, screwed up in the bottom of the bag or used as an excuse for not doing their homework?
        SharePoint is a great tool for document storage and management. You can store any type of document and even edit Word, Excel, PowerPoint and OneNote in your Internet browser without having to have these installed on your computer or smart phone.

        Documents can be tagged allowing you to easily find content with a same relevant name. As the English teacher, you can upload content for your Romeo and Juliet topic and tag all the documents with Romeo and Juliet included. With the right setup, it will automatically tag the documents with English and Shakespeare.

        Social

        There is always an interesting question about where to use social networking in a school. Personally I believe that students use it every day out of school, so we should be doing the same within the school and integrate into their education. SharePoint can help in many ways with an educational angle.

        During the learning section of the post we talked about the ability to tag documents. In SharePoint 2010 we can use these tags within the User Profile services.

        imageA student can subscribe to one of these tags allowing them to see content as it is uploaded. As a student, I am working on Romeo and Juliet in English and I see Romeo and Juliet in a Tag Cloud. This then allows me to see all updates made to this tag, giving me more information on each of my subjects as other use it in the school.

        Each user has their own ‘’profile’’, allowing them to upload an image and give some general information about themselves. (SharePoint allows us to manage this, so you can do things like block photos). One of the features is the ability to say you are an expert in a subject. Link this to your tagging (like Romeo and Juliet) and a student can then use SharePoint Search to find the most relevant documents, the ability to filter and the most relevant member of staff who can help them on that subject.

        SharePoint for All

        Whatever the learning asset, document or process, it can be done in SharePoint, don’t be afraid to ask someone on twitter or on an education community forum such as Edugeek.

         

        Learn MoreRead more about SharePoint in education on Alex Pearce's blog

      • Education

        How to make Windows 10 rock - Silly Competition Time

        • 3 Comments
        LollyJar1

        Yesterday our office celebrated the arrival of Windows 10 with jars of Windows 10 sugary confections. My colleagues here in Australia call it a lolly jar, and I’d call it seaside rock - it’s the kind of sweet that’s made with huge volumes of sugar, and then coloured and rolled, ending up with the words “I Red heart Windows 10” running through every sweet (and now you know ‘How to make Windows 10 rock’ Smile)

        LollyJar2

        Windows 10 Sweet Competition

        In the past, when we’ve launched new products I’ve often tried to get my hands on early copies and given them away in silly competitions on my blog or Twitter. But this time almost everybody is going to get a free Windows 10 upgrade anyway, so instead I collected 10 jars of sweets, and threw in my brand new Targus Bex laptop sleeve, and so we can still have a silly competition!

        I’ll give the prize for the closest guess for how many individual sweets there are in 10 jars of Windows 10 sweets by the 4PM Friday in Sydney.

        To enter, just tweet me with your guess - I’m @rayfleming on Twitter

        Tweet your answer here

        I’ll post them out to a winner in Australia first thing Monday (sorry folks, but I can’t post sweets abroad Sad smile)

      • Education

        Stopping exam cheating - plagiarism checking is not enough

        • 3 Comments

        I read in today’s Sydney Morning Herald the continuing story of universities in Australia fighting a constant battle with cheats in exams and assessments. Today’s story reveals that there’s not just a problem with plagiarism in essays, but also students paying impersonators to sit their exams for them:

         

        University students are increasingly paying impersonators to sit their exams or smuggling in technology to help them cheat, while other students cannot be trusted to sit in sloping auditoriums because of their willingness to copy answers in multiple choice tests, a new report reveals.

         

        The story focuses on one investigation report from an Australian university, but the problem is likely to be happening across a broad range of universities, in Australia and internationally.

        And I realised that two weeks ago I wrote about a way to tackle this, in a way that’s cost effective, quick to implement and simple to do. The answer lives inside my story about “Making machine learning in education easier for every day users” - and something I’d been talking about with customers recently…

        CheatorNot.net

        The simple summary of “Making machine learning in education easier for every day users” is that we’ve developed a series of recipes to help build intelligent services, called Project Oxford, and one of the recipes is to do face recognition - and you can quickly build it into your own app, website or software. The services take the complexity of machine learning tasks, hide all the detail, and let you just perform a simple task - in this case “Are these two pictures of the same person?”. And it is very simple for a developer to use it, because it’s based on our Microsoft Azure Machine Learning service.

        Mat Velloso, one of our developers, built it into a website called TwinsOrNot.net, which lets anybody do the comparison by uploading two photos of your own, or finding two photos with Bing Image Search.

        image

        What is amazing is that Mat built this sitting in a hotel room in the Czech Republic, in one evening, thousands of miles from home, in just four hours. You can read his story of how he created twinsornot.net here, and how it went from a geeky evening-to-kill hotel-room project to a massive viral success (it went from zero users to 75,000 within 7 hours of being demonstrated at a local conference, and a million hits within days).

        The user experience is really simple - you pick your two photographs, and it gives you a percentage probability that the two are the same person.

        The image below is as close as I could get within our own local Education team - apparently there’s a 66% resemblance between Keith and Jason (which really isn’t that close).

        Sample from TwinsOrNot.net - Keith Downs and Jason Trump

        So although it would probably take a human a bit longer to do the checking, the software can instantly tell us that we need to check out Jason if he turns up in the exam hall pretending to be Keith!

        The system also makes allowance for every day differences - different lighting conditions, different styles of photo - even different facial hair. So the two photographs of me below were taken 2 years apart, one with full beard (yeah, I know, I never did that again!) and one without. And yet it knew that both photographs were of me.

        TwinsOrNot.net sample image

        Although TwinsOrNot.net was built as a fun website, exactly the same services could be used to build an app that runs on an exam moderator’s phone, or on a laptop at the entrance to the exam hall, that compares a student’s ID card photo to the person entering the exam, and in real time reports to the proctor whether they are the same person, or there needs to be more checking done.

        If Matt could build this in an evening, then could the same be possible for a university? Well, they already have the components - almost all use the Microsoft Azure cloud services already; they’ve got laptops with webcams and they have got student ID photos. So all it needs is for a developer to spend a few hours building a prototype, and then they could try it in an exam hall by the end of the week. And, just as importantly, they could be ahead of the newspaper headlines within hours…

        This isn't a perfect solution that could completely solve the problem, but (a) this could be done quickly at low cost and take a step forward against cheating and (b) doing it will improve the detection of cheating without adding a huge workload for staff. It’s not designed to give 100% assurance, but out of 100 students it would provide a way to highlight the 5 people that need a bit more checking by a moderator.

        I think that the battle to combat exam cheats is similar to the battle against computer viruses - it’s a game of cat and mouse, and it’s a constant game of improvement iteration at high speed, and this suggestion is another step forward in the game…

        Do you want to build a CheatOrNot website or app?

        1) Well, the website domain is available, because I only just thought of the name…

        2) Listen to Matt Velloso on the MS Dev Show sharing his experiences

        3) Read Mat’s blog, where shares the links he used for building TwinsOrNot.net

        4) Mat's even shared his source code to get you started!

        Once you’ve built a prototype, let me know how it goes!

      • Education

        Could Cortana in education help students and teachers?

        • 3 Comments

        Cortana logo

        Cortana is the intelligent voice-activated assistant on a Windows Phone - described as ‘your personal assistant in your phone’ - and it provides a new way of interacting with other people and your phone. I’ve been using Cortana on my phone for a while now, using the Developer Preview of Windows 8.1 and over time I’ve discovered some great things it can do for me (I most often use it to send an SMS as I’m leaving the office, remind me about something when I arrive somewhere, and to check information in my calendar).

        wp_ss_20140908_0001I’ve got used now to pressing my phone’s search button, and hearing a short tone along with the “Listening…” message pop up - and then talking to my phone as though it was a real person.

        wp_ss_20140908_0002Some of the things I’ve found Cortana does are:

        • Activating your phone - like calling somebody in your contacts
        • Sending text/SMS messages
        • Adding meetings to your calendar, or re-arranging what’s in there
        • Setting reminders that occur at a particular time, or place (like “Remind me to buy milk when I get to the supermarket”)
        • Setting alarms
        • Adding notes to your OneNote file
        • Asking travel questions, like What’s traffic like on the way to school today?

         

        What about using Cortana in education?

        So that got me thinking - how could Cortana in education help improve things for students and teachers? After I discovered that I could ask Cortana “When is my next dentist appointment”, and it would tell me the time and date, it got me thinking about how useful it would be to ask questions like:

        When/what/where is my next lesson?

        When is my next science lesson?

        When is my next essay due?

        And every single one of those questions it worked for! As long as I had things noted in my calendar, which could be either my personal or work calendar, it would find it and let me know, whether it's tomorrow or in six months’ time! What a help for a time-poor or disorganised student. And a teacher could set a reminder like “Remind me to talk about the Ice Age next time I meet Year 7 Geography

        Using Cortana to make it easier to use apps

        wp_ss_20140908_0003But what I’ve discovered more recently is the way that I can use Cortana with apps - like asking Cortana to make a Skype call (“Call Sarah on Skype”), or joining a conference call (“Lync join next meeting”).
        Cortana isn’t just for Microsoft-written applications, as developers can use the Cortana APIs to allow users to interact with their app through Cortana. Some of the examples from third-party developers that I’ve found on my phone are:

        • - Send a tweet through different Twitter clients. I’ve tried it with Twitter’s native app as well as Rowi
        • - Read my LinkedIn groups and inbox
        • - Listen to radio, and even the local Air Traffic Control through LiveATC
        • - Search Wikipedia, and get the first part of a Wikipedia article read to you!

        What about using Cortana with a Learning Management System?
        Or a Student Management System? Or your Lecture Capture System?…

        So if it can do all of those things, I think there are some very cool scenarios that Cortana could enable to make life easier for students and teachers. Here’s some examples that I think would be really cool to build. How about being able to say things like:

        • Download my assignment notes from the LMS
        • Ask for an extension for my essay deadline
        • Send a homework text to the students who aren’t in class today
        • Send a text to the parents of students absent today
        • What lessons do I have today
        • Tell me how long my child used Mathletics this week
        • Show me the students who haven’t used Mathletics this week
        • Record this lecture
        • Send a reminder to all students who haven’t yet handed in their homework assignment

        To do some of the tasks above, there will need to be some work done by software developers, to connect Cortana to their apps. And if that’s done, then there’s some great ways that the apps will be able to simplify life for teachers, students and parents. And it can all be started from pressing the same Search button on their phone.

        What next?

        Developers - there’s some great resources on how to use Cortana with your apps. Start with the Channel 9 video  What developers need to know about the Cortana APIs, and then have a read of the article “Responding to speech interactions” which guides you through the process of setting up your app to accept recognised commands from Cortana.

        Teachers and Students - what are the scenarios that you’d like developers to add to their apps? Let me know via the comments box, and I’ll share them as I meet with developers. There are probably some cool things Cortana can already do, but I bet you can find a dozen other things that you’d like to see done to make your life easier as a student, teacher or parent. What are your thoughts?

      • Education

        Australia Microsoft Surface RT offer for Education

        • 3 Comments

        imageYou may have heard about the worldwide launch of a great Microsoft Surface offer for schools and tertiary education customers. It is exclusively for education institutions, to buy Microsoft Surface RT tablets at a reduced price for a limited time. The good news is that I can share with you the details for Australian education customers.

        From now until August 31, 2013, schools, TAFEs and universities in Australia can get:

        • Surface RT (32 GB) for AU$219 (Estimated Retail Price is $559)
        • Surface RT (32 GB) Touch Keyboard Cover for AU$279 (Estimated Retail Price is $679)
        • Surface RT (32 GB) Type Keyboard Cover for AU$319 (Estimated Retail Price is $708)
          All the prices above include GST

        Surface RT provides students and teachers with Microsoft Office Home & Student 2013 RT pre-installed. The Microsoft Surface offer for schools also opens the door to thousands — more than 20,000, to be precise — of education related apps in the Windows Store, from big names like Khan Academy, Kno, Chegg, and major textbook publishers such as HMH and Pearson. And there are some fabulous apps from Australia publishers that support new modes of learning in the classroom – like nsquared make words, just one of eight free apps of theirs you’ll find in the Windows Store.

        If you were considering buying non-Windows tablets for your students and staff, then in my opinion, there’s nothing comparable to this Microsoft Surface offer for schools  – and in many cases with this offer you’d not only get the Windows and Office experience, you’d be able to put twice as many devices into the hands of students with the same budget. You get a Windows device that supports mouse, keyboard, USB and video displays – so that you can plug in printers, projectors, external screens etc. And you get Microsoft Office pre-installed, which means that your students can continue to work with the existing tools they already know – like PowerPoint, Word, Excel and OneNote. And your teachers don’t have to re-write all of their curriculum resources and lessons plans either. Plus you give them a device with all-day battery life, true Windows multi-tasking so they can have apps running side by side, and you can have individual profiles and logins for each student.

        If you’re asking why now is the right time for us to take such an ambitious step into the education market, the answer is simple: It’s because Microsoft believes every student and teacher deserves a fair opportunity to reach his or her full potential, and this means ensuring our education customers have access to affordable and high quality tablets with laptop functionality ready for education.

        This Surface offer is just one of the options for putting Windows touch tablets and laptops into the hands of your staff and students. As we showed at the recent EduTech conference in Brisbane, Windows devices come in a variety of shapes, sizes, features and price points to serve all our education customer needs. And over the last few months I’ve highlighted stories about new Windows 8 devices from Dell, Asus, HP, Samsung and Lenovo. We are continuing to work with OEMs on delivering their latest tablets and PCs, and I’ll have more to share on devices and offers from them shortly.

        Although this information is specific to Australia, similar Microsoft Surface offers for education are available in other countries – hop over to the global Microsoft in Education blog for details of others.

        How the offer works

        The way this works is really simple – there’s a downloadable brochure and order form for education institutions* which contains the details of the devices, and the usual terms and conditions. You simply complete the Order Form and send it back to the Surface team (who are on surfaceedu@microsoft.com) who’ll arrange to get your order supplied.

        * Yep, the offer is only available to official education institutions in Australia (see our criteria here), not to individual students or teachers to place an order. For good reasons, if you wanted to buy one for your personal use with your own money, then you’ll need to buy yours through the normal retailers at normal retail price

        For more information and to order, see the Surface RT for Education brochure and return the completed order form to the Surface team.

        Learn MoreGo to  the offer site for the Brochure, Pricing and Order Form

      • Education

        Windows 8 in Education: Windows Store apps and deployment

        • 3 Comments

        This is part two of a set of articles on Windows 8 deployment in education. To start at the beginning, take a look at yesterday’s “Windows 8 in Education: Deployment Planning Guide

        The use of Windows 8 on devices in education brings many new benefits, features and technology capabilities. One prominent feature is the Windows Store and the new Windows 8 apps. Educational institutions can purchase or create apps for Windows 8 that use the new user interface of Windows 8, and use these alongside apps and resources that they used on previous versions of Windows.

        I’ve noticed though that existence of the Windows Store has often raised new questions (especially from schools). The questions include:

        • Why don’t I just block the Windows Store, and not let users install any apps
        • What is the best way to deploy Windows Store apps in an educational environment?
        • Do all the apps for my students and staff need to come from the Windows Store?
        • Can I use existing deployment technologies and processes to deploy apps?

        This guide, written specifically for Windows 8 in education, offers advice on app deployment strategies, and gives you considerations to help you selecting the right one(s). It is written for IT managers in education institutions, and also to give them the information to advise leaders and teachers on the agreed strategy.

        imageSome of the decisions that you’ll need to make, and that this guide will help you with, include:

        • How much freedom is it appropriate to give on selecting and installing new apps (and should this be different for staff and students)?
        • Should my strategy be different for institution-owned and individually-owned devices?
        • If a device is dedicated to a single user, do I need a different strategy than for shared devices?
        • Who owns apps when they are bought?

        The two fundamental models of app distribution that are explained in the guide are:

        • Windows Store: using a Microsoft account, and purchasing apps using a similar model that consumers and others will use
        • Sideloading: deploying apps directly to devices yourself, without using the Windows Store

        Sideloading Windows 8 apps

        The deployment guide for Windows Store apps provides an overview of what ‘sideloading’ is all about:

         

        Sideloading is a process for installing Windows Store apps without using the Windows Store. To sideload an app, you must have access to the app installation files (.appx and related files), which you can obtain from the app developer (either internally or from an independent software vendor). You cannot obtain app installation files to be used for sideloading through the Windows Store.

        For apps you install by sideloading, you are responsible for validating and signing them, as sideloading bypasses the validation  requirements of the Windows Store. Also, you are responsible for deploying any app updates to their users.

        IT pros often perform sideloading by using an enterprise app store. An enterprise app store provides similar features to the Windows Store but is exclusive to an organization. You can create such a store by using an electronic distribution system, such as Microsoft SystemCenter 2012 Configuration Manager with Service Pack (SP) 1 or Windows Intune. An enterprise app store allows you to manage the app through the entire software life cycle, including deployment, updates, supersedence, and uninstallation.

         

        Sideloading allows you to deploy an app to a device, for use by all users on the device with their own individual account, or just to a specific account (for example, you might deploy a timetable app to any user, whereas you’d only make a behaviour monitoring app available to a staff user). And you can get apps for sideloading from different places – we don’t make you buy everything through the Windows Store. It’s pretty much as you do on PCs today – you can buy directly from a software company, or through a catalogue, or in an online store.

        Sideloaded apps can be deployed to devices at multiple stages (eg when you first install the computer operating system, or later in its lifetime), and using different tools (Windows Intune, SystemCenter, the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit, or you can even use the command line). And apps can also be sideloaded onto student-owned PCs, assuming you have the right licences setup.

        The model of app deployment could be more complex than today’s model, because there are more kinds of apps, and more deployment options. The value in this guide is to explain the different processes, along with their benefits and limits, to help you to find the model that’s going to work for your users, your institution, and your mix of device ownerships.

        Learn MoreRead the full guide: “Windows Store Apps: A Deployment Guide for Education”

      • Education

        Can education customers get Yammer free?

        • 3 Comments

        Yammer on a cloudWe announced recently that Yammer for education customers will be free of charge this Spring (that's, Spring in the Northern Hemisphere, or as we would call it in Australia, 'Autumn/early Winter'), through your Office 365 for Education subscription (which is also free). Which means that educational institutions are able to have a communication system (through Office 365’s email and Lync service), collaboration and document storage (through Office 365’s SharePoint and OneDrive), and secure social networking and collaboration (through Yammer) – all of which is free.

        The beauty of Yammer is that it can be fully integrated into your user database – so you create a private place for just your users to collaborate and mingle, and can enable and disable users easily. And then within Yammer you can create public and private groups – so staff can have private planning and discussion areas that others can’t access. Or groups of students can be placed into individual communities, for classes, subjects, sports and social groups etc. It also has a range of apps for mobile devices, so your users can access it on the go from their iPhone, Windows Phone, Android phones etc

        Yammer for Education

        There has always been a basic free version of Yammer that users can sign up to individually, and create communities and groups, and some education users in Australia have already been using that for some time (some of them with hundreds or thousands of users). But when you want to have organisational control over your users, then in the past you would have had to paid for the full Yammer Enterprise version. But soon, that’s the version that education customers can get free.

        The major difference between Yammer and other social networking systems is that your Yammer network is private, and controlled by you. You don’t have individual teachers uploading lists of students to third-party websites, and managing them outside of your existing systems. Instead, your IT team have full control over your users in the same way that they do for other systems in your school, TAFE or university. Adding and deleting/disabling users is all done centrally. And you have control and visibility of the content and conversations that are happening.

        Yammer logo

        Some of the key features of Yammer that are relevant for education customers are:

        • Create and participate in groups – you can define groups and assign members, or your users can set up their own groups and invite members.
        • Announcements – for everybody, or just specific groups. This can be used to send out important updates that everybody in a group needs (eg a teacher might use an announcement to send out a curriculum assignment)
        • Praise – users can give and receive recognition, and accomplishments and badges appear on profiles
        • Interact with other users – just like other social networks, you can @mention people, see who’s online, create private messages and share conversations. Plus users can create quick polls
        • File and note sharing – users can upload Office documents, PDFs etc and share them across their groups. You can have user-uploaded content, as well as ‘Official content’, which appears higher in search results and content directories.
        • IT managers will love the user management features, including Directory Sync, custom branding, and Keyword Monitoring (this allows you to track the use of sensitive keywords, and get instant alerts if they are used on your Yammer network)

        What do I need to do to get Yammer Enterprise once it is available?

        Once Yammer Enterprise is available, Office 365 Education tenant administrators will receive an activation link in their Office 365 admin portal. You then visit the Office 365 Admin Portal to begin the self-guided provisioning process. There’s a complete Yammer Activation Guide here.  There are also additional resources on activation and provisioning from Yammer.

        Learn MoreLearn more about Yammer

      • Education

        Understanding the Learning Strategies of the 21st Century Learner - Virtual Professional Development webcast series

        • 2 Comments

        Microsoft PIL Webcast header

        Our worldwide Partners in Learning team run a series of Education webcasts focused on providing deep insights into teaching and learning. They are run from the Microsoft global headquarters in Seattle, and feature presenters from around the world. Fortunately for us in Australia, they are scheduled to run twice during the same day, and the one that runs at 5PM Seattle time is Australia-friendly!


        Understanding the Learning Strategies of the 21st Century Learner - webcast

        In the morning of Thursday 24th October in Australia
        (10AM – QLD; 10:30AM – SA; 11AM – NSW/VIC; 8AM – WA)

        Join this great dialogue on the 5 best strategies every 21st century learner needs to succeed in school and in the workplace. Why a capacity to learn is more important than knowing. Topics covered will be:

        • How to remove the roadblocks to learning
        • 3 Steps to understanding everything you read
        • Best Study Skills for 21st century learners
        • Technology strategies that enhance learning

        During the webinar, three ‘Amazing Grades’ books will be given away to the first three attendees asking questions. Amazing Grades is a worldwide goodwill book with 101 authors from 13 countries around the world and includes a special bonus chapter by Nasha Fitter of Microsoft.

        Presented by:

        imagePat Wyman, College Professor, author, and Founder & CEO, HowToLearn.com
        Pat is a College Professor, founder and CEO of HowToLearn.com and best-selling author of Amazing Grades:101 Best Ways to Improve Your Grades Faster and Spelling Made Easy: Learn Your Words in Half the Time  

        imageBonnie Terry, Board Certified Educational Therapist and best-selling author, BonnieTerryLearning.com
        Bonnie, best-selling author of School Strategies for ADHD Kids, Five Minutes To Better Reading Skills, and Ten Minutes To Better Study Skills and one of the co-authors of Amazing Grades. She is a Board Certified Educational Therapist and internationally recognized as America's Leading Learning Specialist.  

        imageSusan Kruger, M.Ed, best-selling author, and Founder, StudySkills.com
        Susan is the founder of StudySkills.com and best-selling author of SOAR® Study Skills: A Simple & Efficient System for Getting Better Grades in Less Time. She will be speaking on the best study skills for 21st century learners.

        Make a dateMake a date: Find out more, and register, for the webcast
        The website lists the time in US Pacific Daylight time as 5PM on 23rd, which is on the 24th October for Australia. At 11AM for those in NSW & Victoria; 10AM in Queensland; 10:30AM in South Australia and 8AM in Western Australia

      • Education

        Windows 8 in Education: How to deploy Windows 8 in education

        • 2 Comments

        This is part five of a set of articles on Windows 8 deployment in education. To start at the beginning, take a look at  “Windows 8 in Education: Deployment Planning Guide”, then “Windows 8 in Education: Windows Store apps and deployment”, followed by “Windows 8 in Education: setting up Virtual Desktop Infrastructure in education” and finally “Windows 8 in Education: Deployment Guide for BYOD in Education”.

        The Windows 8 deployment guide for education

        imageThis guide contains advice on how to deploy Windows 8 in education – covering the technical aspects that an IT team will need to know to easily and securely deploy Windows 8 to existing and new computers in a school, TAFE or university. There are a number of key deployment strategies discussed, including deploying standard images on every machine, and light-touch or zero-touch Windows 8 deployments. Even if you have been deploying Windows computers for years, and have a standard mechanism that you’ve used successfully for all of that time, I would still recommend reviewing the alternative mechanisms that have been developed for Windows 8, to ensure that your chosen model is still the most efficient – for both your IT team, and for your users. This is especially critical in a world where users have an expectation of more individual control over their devices, their choice of software, and their modes of use. The way you choose to deploy Windows 8 to your users is going to be one of the first decisions which could ultimately decide how happy your users are with the IT system that you provide – and that’s becoming more key as teaching staff have increasing control over their own use of technology, and whether or not they use your corporate systems.

        As an aside, I used to work for an organisation where the IT team had so tightly controlled what users did, that the impact was that users increasingly ended up building an alternative IT system through a combination of mobile devices and mobile internet services – the upshot was that IT had significantly less visibility and control of users’ activities than if they’d had given users a little more control and flexibility in the first place. And when your users are switching to using third-party web services for their day-to-day activities, you give up huge amounts of control. I’ve heard of scenarios of teaching staff bringing servers into their classroom to allow their students to use collaborative environments, because the IT system provided centrally blocks access to the apps and web-based servers they want to use. The lesson for me from this is that sometimes IT’s insistence on too much control actually leads to radically less control!

        The three primary methods for deploying Windows 8 in education

        You can install Windows 8 onto devices within your institution in many ways. Although deployment strategies for enterprise customers typically apply to educational deployments too, certain requirements make educational deployments unique. All educational environments need to provide not only for administrative staff but also for teachers and students, each of whom has special requirements for their computing environment. Historically, many education users have chosen to deploy a single image to their computers which includes the operating system, all the required application software, drivers and updates. However, the recommended strategy now is to deploy a ‘thin image’ which includes the operating system only, and then to deploy applications, drivers and updates after the initial deployment.

        Either way, you then need to pick one of three primary methods for deploying Windows 8:

        • Manual installation
        • Image-based deployment
        • Automated installation

        This deployment guide for education talks you through each option, including which tools are available from Microsoft to help you make it easier, and the factors that will help you decide between the options available. The four strategies discussed are:

        • High-touch, with retail media
        • High-touch, with a standard image
        • Lite-touch, for higher volume deployments
        • Zero-touch, for very high volume deployments

        To pick the right one, you’ll need to consider how many computers you are deploying to, where your computers are based, what skills are available in the team doing the deployment, which of the combination of free and licensed Microsoft deployment software you have/want to use, and whether or not you’ll also be deploying standard applications at the same time.

        For each option, the Windows 8 deployment guide for education then steps you through the things you’ll need, the decisions you will have to make, and the steps to take – and provides a deep set of reference materials for you to use.

        The final chapter also guides you through the tools available for managing institution-owned computers, so that you can see the benefits, limitations and requirements of each option – and so helping you with the ongoing lifecycle management of your IT systems.

        Pretty obviously, this guide isn’t for everybody – it’s really the thing that will light up the faces of the IT team as they dive down into what quickly becomes an acronym-lovers guide to IT (if you get excited about whether to choose between ADBA, KMS or MAK for Windows activation, this guide’s for you!). But the authors have done a great job of providing good overviews, without throwing too much detail too quickly; and then they have also provided reference links to much deeper detail.

        Learn MoreDownload the Deployment Guide here (PDF)

      • Education

        Webinar on cloud privacy and data sovereignty

        • 2 Comments

        image

        The benefits of cloud computing for public sector organisations run right across the public sector, including education. 
        But as executives explore the opportunities, they often become concerned about data security and the privacy risks associated with online services – and justifiably so.

        We’re running a webinar tomorrow (12 March) at 2PM AEDT, where we’ll tackle the sensitive issue of data privacy head-on to reveal both the potential pain points and how your organisation can mitigate the risks.

        The ability to offer new services. The potential to improve operating efficiencies. Deepening customer engagement. There’s no disputing the upside of the cloud. But balancing individual privacy, corporate security and state sovereignty in this brave new world can prove challenging. In the webinar, our cloud experts will:

        • Explore the potential risks cloud computing presents
        • Share our experience in how real the risks are
        • Offer insights on how to overcome them
        • Reveal what’s needed to undertake a cloud-risk assessment – and how to share your findings with managers

        Two senior Microsoft Australia employees will share their experiences of compliance and security, explain the impact of cloud computing and shed light on data privacy, security and sovereignty.

        imageJames Kavanagh

        Chief Security Officer, Microsoft Australia
        imageShaun Tipson

        Senior Attorney, Microsoft Australia

        The webinar runs tomorrow, Weds 12 March, at 2PM AEDT.

        Register now for the Cloud webinar on 12 March 2014

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