statcounter tracker
Education - Site Home - MSDN Blogs
The Australian Education Blog
Ray Fleming's take on what's interesting in Education IT in Australia

  • Education

    Windows 8 in Education: Windows Store apps and deployment

    • 3 Comments

    This is part two of a set of articles on Windows 8 deployment in education. To start at the beginning, take a look at yesterday’s “Windows 8 in Education: Deployment Planning Guide

    The use of Windows 8 on devices in education brings many new benefits, features and technology capabilities. One prominent feature is the Windows Store and the new Windows 8 apps. Educational institutions can purchase or create apps for Windows 8 that use the new user interface of Windows 8, and use these alongside apps and resources that they used on previous versions of Windows.

    I’ve noticed though that existence of the Windows Store has often raised new questions (especially from schools). The questions include:

    • Why don’t I just block the Windows Store, and not let users install any apps
    • What is the best way to deploy Windows Store apps in an educational environment?
    • Do all the apps for my students and staff need to come from the Windows Store?
    • Can I use existing deployment technologies and processes to deploy apps?

    This guide, written specifically for Windows 8 in education, offers advice on app deployment strategies, and gives you considerations to help you selecting the right one(s). It is written for IT managers in education institutions, and also to give them the information to advise leaders and teachers on the agreed strategy.

    imageSome of the decisions that you’ll need to make, and that this guide will help you with, include:

    • How much freedom is it appropriate to give on selecting and installing new apps (and should this be different for staff and students)?
    • Should my strategy be different for institution-owned and individually-owned devices?
    • If a device is dedicated to a single user, do I need a different strategy than for shared devices?
    • Who owns apps when they are bought?

    The two fundamental models of app distribution that are explained in the guide are:

    • Windows Store: using a Microsoft account, and purchasing apps using a similar model that consumers and others will use
    • Sideloading: deploying apps directly to devices yourself, without using the Windows Store

    Sideloading Windows 8 apps

    The deployment guide for Windows Store apps provides an overview of what ‘sideloading’ is all about:

     

    Sideloading is a process for installing Windows Store apps without using the Windows Store. To sideload an app, you must have access to the app installation files (.appx and related files), which you can obtain from the app developer (either internally or from an independent software vendor). You cannot obtain app installation files to be used for sideloading through the Windows Store.

    For apps you install by sideloading, you are responsible for validating and signing them, as sideloading bypasses the validation  requirements of the Windows Store. Also, you are responsible for deploying any app updates to their users.

    IT pros often perform sideloading by using an enterprise app store. An enterprise app store provides similar features to the Windows Store but is exclusive to an organization. You can create such a store by using an electronic distribution system, such as Microsoft SystemCenter 2012 Configuration Manager with Service Pack (SP) 1 or Windows Intune. An enterprise app store allows you to manage the app through the entire software life cycle, including deployment, updates, supersedence, and uninstallation.

     

    Sideloading allows you to deploy an app to a device, for use by all users on the device with their own individual account, or just to a specific account (for example, you might deploy a timetable app to any user, whereas you’d only make a behaviour monitoring app available to a staff user). And you can get apps for sideloading from different places – we don’t make you buy everything through the Windows Store. It’s pretty much as you do on PCs today – you can buy directly from a software company, or through a catalogue, or in an online store.

    Sideloaded apps can be deployed to devices at multiple stages (eg when you first install the computer operating system, or later in its lifetime), and using different tools (Windows Intune, SystemCenter, the Microsoft Deployment Toolkit, or you can even use the command line). And apps can also be sideloaded onto student-owned PCs, assuming you have the right licences setup.

    The model of app deployment could be more complex than today’s model, because there are more kinds of apps, and more deployment options. The value in this guide is to explain the different processes, along with their benefits and limits, to help you to find the model that’s going to work for your users, your institution, and your mix of device ownerships.

    Learn MoreRead the full guide: “Windows Store Apps: A Deployment Guide for Education”

  • Education

    Can education customers get Yammer free?

    • 3 Comments

    Yammer on a cloudWe announced recently that Yammer for education customers will be free of charge this Spring (that's, Spring in the Northern Hemisphere, or as we would call it in Australia, 'Autumn/early Winter'), through your Office 365 for Education subscription (which is also free). Which means that educational institutions are able to have a communication system (through Office 365’s email and Lync service), collaboration and document storage (through Office 365’s SharePoint and OneDrive), and secure social networking and collaboration (through Yammer) – all of which is free.

    The beauty of Yammer is that it can be fully integrated into your user database – so you create a private place for just your users to collaborate and mingle, and can enable and disable users easily. And then within Yammer you can create public and private groups – so staff can have private planning and discussion areas that others can’t access. Or groups of students can be placed into individual communities, for classes, subjects, sports and social groups etc. It also has a range of apps for mobile devices, so your users can access it on the go from their iPhone, Windows Phone, Android phones etc

    Yammer for Education

    There has always been a basic free version of Yammer that users can sign up to individually, and create communities and groups, and some education users in Australia have already been using that for some time (some of them with hundreds or thousands of users). But when you want to have organisational control over your users, then in the past you would have had to paid for the full Yammer Enterprise version. But soon, that’s the version that education customers can get free.

    The major difference between Yammer and other social networking systems is that your Yammer network is private, and controlled by you. You don’t have individual teachers uploading lists of students to third-party websites, and managing them outside of your existing systems. Instead, your IT team have full control over your users in the same way that they do for other systems in your school, TAFE or university. Adding and deleting/disabling users is all done centrally. And you have control and visibility of the content and conversations that are happening.

    Yammer logo

    Some of the key features of Yammer that are relevant for education customers are:

    • Create and participate in groups – you can define groups and assign members, or your users can set up their own groups and invite members.
    • Announcements – for everybody, or just specific groups. This can be used to send out important updates that everybody in a group needs (eg a teacher might use an announcement to send out a curriculum assignment)
    • Praise – users can give and receive recognition, and accomplishments and badges appear on profiles
    • Interact with other users – just like other social networks, you can @mention people, see who’s online, create private messages and share conversations. Plus users can create quick polls
    • File and note sharing – users can upload Office documents, PDFs etc and share them across their groups. You can have user-uploaded content, as well as ‘Official content’, which appears higher in search results and content directories.
    • IT managers will love the user management features, including Directory Sync, custom branding, and Keyword Monitoring (this allows you to track the use of sensitive keywords, and get instant alerts if they are used on your Yammer network)

    What do I need to do to get Yammer Enterprise once it is available?

    Once Yammer Enterprise is available, Office 365 Education tenant administrators will receive an activation link in their Office 365 admin portal. You then visit the Office 365 Admin Portal to begin the self-guided provisioning process. There’s a complete Yammer Activation Guide here.  There are also additional resources on activation and provisioning from Yammer.

    Learn MoreLearn more about Yammer

  • Education

    Windows 8 in Education: How to deploy Windows 8 in education

    • 2 Comments

    This is part five of a set of articles on Windows 8 deployment in education. To start at the beginning, take a look at  “Windows 8 in Education: Deployment Planning Guide”, then “Windows 8 in Education: Windows Store apps and deployment”, followed by “Windows 8 in Education: setting up Virtual Desktop Infrastructure in education” and finally “Windows 8 in Education: Deployment Guide for BYOD in Education”.

    The Windows 8 deployment guide for education

    imageThis guide contains advice on how to deploy Windows 8 in education – covering the technical aspects that an IT team will need to know to easily and securely deploy Windows 8 to existing and new computers in a school, TAFE or university. There are a number of key deployment strategies discussed, including deploying standard images on every machine, and light-touch or zero-touch Windows 8 deployments. Even if you have been deploying Windows computers for years, and have a standard mechanism that you’ve used successfully for all of that time, I would still recommend reviewing the alternative mechanisms that have been developed for Windows 8, to ensure that your chosen model is still the most efficient – for both your IT team, and for your users. This is especially critical in a world where users have an expectation of more individual control over their devices, their choice of software, and their modes of use. The way you choose to deploy Windows 8 to your users is going to be one of the first decisions which could ultimately decide how happy your users are with the IT system that you provide – and that’s becoming more key as teaching staff have increasing control over their own use of technology, and whether or not they use your corporate systems.

    As an aside, I used to work for an organisation where the IT team had so tightly controlled what users did, that the impact was that users increasingly ended up building an alternative IT system through a combination of mobile devices and mobile internet services – the upshot was that IT had significantly less visibility and control of users’ activities than if they’d had given users a little more control and flexibility in the first place. And when your users are switching to using third-party web services for their day-to-day activities, you give up huge amounts of control. I’ve heard of scenarios of teaching staff bringing servers into their classroom to allow their students to use collaborative environments, because the IT system provided centrally blocks access to the apps and web-based servers they want to use. The lesson for me from this is that sometimes IT’s insistence on too much control actually leads to radically less control!

    The three primary methods for deploying Windows 8 in education

    You can install Windows 8 onto devices within your institution in many ways. Although deployment strategies for enterprise customers typically apply to educational deployments too, certain requirements make educational deployments unique. All educational environments need to provide not only for administrative staff but also for teachers and students, each of whom has special requirements for their computing environment. Historically, many education users have chosen to deploy a single image to their computers which includes the operating system, all the required application software, drivers and updates. However, the recommended strategy now is to deploy a ‘thin image’ which includes the operating system only, and then to deploy applications, drivers and updates after the initial deployment.

    Either way, you then need to pick one of three primary methods for deploying Windows 8:

    • Manual installation
    • Image-based deployment
    • Automated installation

    This deployment guide for education talks you through each option, including which tools are available from Microsoft to help you make it easier, and the factors that will help you decide between the options available. The four strategies discussed are:

    • High-touch, with retail media
    • High-touch, with a standard image
    • Lite-touch, for higher volume deployments
    • Zero-touch, for very high volume deployments

    To pick the right one, you’ll need to consider how many computers you are deploying to, where your computers are based, what skills are available in the team doing the deployment, which of the combination of free and licensed Microsoft deployment software you have/want to use, and whether or not you’ll also be deploying standard applications at the same time.

    For each option, the Windows 8 deployment guide for education then steps you through the things you’ll need, the decisions you will have to make, and the steps to take – and provides a deep set of reference materials for you to use.

    The final chapter also guides you through the tools available for managing institution-owned computers, so that you can see the benefits, limitations and requirements of each option – and so helping you with the ongoing lifecycle management of your IT systems.

    Pretty obviously, this guide isn’t for everybody – it’s really the thing that will light up the faces of the IT team as they dive down into what quickly becomes an acronym-lovers guide to IT (if you get excited about whether to choose between ADBA, KMS or MAK for Windows activation, this guide’s for you!). But the authors have done a great job of providing good overviews, without throwing too much detail too quickly; and then they have also provided reference links to much deeper detail.

    Learn MoreDownload the Deployment Guide here (PDF)

  • Education

    Update 1: The Microsoft Surface offer for schools, TAFEs and universities in Australia

    • 2 Comments

    imageI published the key info yesterday on the Microsoft Surface RT offer for education customers in Australia, which allows schools, TAFEs and universities to buy Surface RT from AU$219.

    Overnight I’ve had a couple of questions from people about the offer, and I’ve also laid my hands on the full Surface RT Offer FAQ document that we published, so here’s a summary:

    Common questions about the Surface RT offer for education

    Is there a minimum order requirement for the Surface RT offer?

    No. Education institutions may buy any quantity of Surface RT for their organisation. Pricing is only available until 31 August 2013. And you can place as many orders as you wish – for example, you could order a dozen now for your staff, and then some for students separately (do bear in mind that the offer is only valid while supplies last).

    How do institutions order their Surface RTs?

    The Surface RT in Education brochure contains an order form (all the forms are linked here). Fill out the order form with a valid purchase order number and send it to SurfaceEDU@microsoft.com. You will get an email back confirming the order and details on fulfilment.

    What does shipping cost?

    We’ve already included that in the price of the offer, so there aren’t any additional shipping charges

    How does Surface RT compare to iPad and Android?

    There are many differences between Surface RT and iPad and Android. One of the most important differences to schools is Surface RT comes with a touch-optimised version of Microsoft Office Home & Student 2013 RT - Word, PowerPoint, Excel and OneNote (the free Windows 8.1 update will also provide an RT version of Outlook). Microsoft Office is among the most popular productivity software in schools and businesses. Its inclusion in Surface RT means that your students and teachers will be ready to get to work on Surface right away.
    Surface RT also lets users multitask between applications, share the device between many users, provides USB and HD video out ports, optional keyboard covers, integration of Internet Explorer 10 to run Flash based websites, lots of storage and a file system, a high quality display, and excellent battery life.

    I’ve heard there are more apps on iOS and Android? What can I expect from Surface RT?

    With over 20,000 educationally-relevant apps worldwide in the Windows Store from many of the biggest names in education, like Khan Academy and leading publishers - there is an app for almost every subject.

    I’ve listed some of my early favourite Windows 8 education apps here, and our worldwide team have featured a list of Windows 8 apps by categories here.

    There are also some fabulous apps from Australian companies that have been released for Windows 8, and provide new learning possibilities with touch devices, plus all the ones I’ve listed here have free versions too:

    But don’t forget, that because Microsoft has optimized the web browsing experience for HTML 5 and Flash, you don’t need lots of specific apps like you do on tablets which can run Flash. For example, you can run the full Mathletics website on a Surface RT, whereas on an iPad you have to download apps containing some parts of the Mathletics resources, because you can’t access a Flash website fully.

    Is this the only device that there are offers for?

    There are lots of Windows 8 computers and tablets available from our partners, and many of them are also running special offers on Windows 8 devices for education customers. You’ll find the info on offers from Lenovo, Acer, HP, Fujitsu and Toshiba over on our main website.

    What is the difference between Windows 8 and Windows RT?

    Windows 8 comes in three versions (Home, Pro and Enterprise) and runs on Intel x86 chipset. Windows RT comes in one version and runs on the ARM chipset. Windows RT devices are lightweight, have thin form factors, and better battery life. Windows 8 x86 devices can run your existing legacy Windows software, and software requiring intense processing power, as well as the new modern Windows 8 apps downloaded from the Windows Store. Windows RT ARM devices can run applications like Microsoft Office 2013 RT and the new modern Windows 8 apps exclusively from the Windows Store. Windows 8 x86 devices running Windows 8 Pro and Windows 8 Enterprise have enterprise level security and manageability features.
    You can read more about the differences on the main Microsoft website under “Which Surface is right for you?

    On the Order Form, what does “Institution tax ID” mean?

    What we’re asking for is the institution’s ABN number. It allows us to check the official purchase order details.

    We’ve already got a Hardware Vendor Panel  that Surface RT isn’t on – can we still order?

    I understand the issue around hardware vendor panels, and recognise that may be an issue for some institutions. You’ll need to check your institution’s processes and guidelines. I know that some people will have to miss out on this offer because of their rules, whilst others have ways of making exceptional one-off purchases.

    I’ve read that Windows RT devices can’t connect to a domain – is that right?

    OK, fair to say that this question came from somebody quite technical, but I know others will be interested in my answer! Although you’re absolutely right that you can’t ‘Domain Join’ a Windows RT device, with Windows 8.1 (which will be a free upgrade) we’ve included a range of significant enhancements to improve manageability using non-domain joined computers.

    Some of the additional capabilities coming to Windows 8.1 are:

    • Workplace Join – giving a middle ground between all or nothing access, allowing a user to work on the device of their choice, and still have access to corporate resources. IT can grant some access rights, and enforce some governance parameters on the device
    • Work Folders – allows a user to sync data to their device for a network user folder, and IT can enforce policies including automated Rights Management (eg as they leave the school, they lose access to the Work Folders on their device & centrally)
    • Improved Mobile Device Management – of course, even though I’d love everybody to use our System Center for management, we’ve included support for Open MDM so that customers can choose from a range of tools. My advice for looking at device management is to consider the role of Intune, because of the capabilities it enables (like having an institutional app store available to Windows 8 devices, whether they are domain-controlled or simply device managed.

    I’d recommend reading the full article on the new features in Windows 8.1 for enterprises on TechNet

    Here’s a downloadable PDF version of the official Surface RT Offer FAQ, if you’d like something to share with colleagues.

     

    Learn MoreYou can either read my overview of the Microsoft Surface RT offer for education customers in Australia from yesterday, or go to  the official offer site to download the Brochure, Pricing and Order Forms

  • Education

    Understanding the Learning Strategies of the 21st Century Learner - Virtual Professional Development webcast series

    • 2 Comments

    Microsoft PIL Webcast header

    Our worldwide Partners in Learning team run a series of Education webcasts focused on providing deep insights into teaching and learning. They are run from the Microsoft global headquarters in Seattle, and feature presenters from around the world. Fortunately for us in Australia, they are scheduled to run twice during the same day, and the one that runs at 5PM Seattle time is Australia-friendly!


    Understanding the Learning Strategies of the 21st Century Learner - webcast

    In the morning of Thursday 24th October in Australia
    (10AM – QLD; 10:30AM – SA; 11AM – NSW/VIC; 8AM – WA)

    Join this great dialogue on the 5 best strategies every 21st century learner needs to succeed in school and in the workplace. Why a capacity to learn is more important than knowing. Topics covered will be:

    • How to remove the roadblocks to learning
    • 3 Steps to understanding everything you read
    • Best Study Skills for 21st century learners
    • Technology strategies that enhance learning

    During the webinar, three ‘Amazing Grades’ books will be given away to the first three attendees asking questions. Amazing Grades is a worldwide goodwill book with 101 authors from 13 countries around the world and includes a special bonus chapter by Nasha Fitter of Microsoft.

    Presented by:

    imagePat Wyman, College Professor, author, and Founder & CEO, HowToLearn.com
    Pat is a College Professor, founder and CEO of HowToLearn.com and best-selling author of Amazing Grades:101 Best Ways to Improve Your Grades Faster and Spelling Made Easy: Learn Your Words in Half the Time  

    imageBonnie Terry, Board Certified Educational Therapist and best-selling author, BonnieTerryLearning.com
    Bonnie, best-selling author of School Strategies for ADHD Kids, Five Minutes To Better Reading Skills, and Ten Minutes To Better Study Skills and one of the co-authors of Amazing Grades. She is a Board Certified Educational Therapist and internationally recognized as America's Leading Learning Specialist.  

    imageSusan Kruger, M.Ed, best-selling author, and Founder, StudySkills.com
    Susan is the founder of StudySkills.com and best-selling author of SOAR® Study Skills: A Simple & Efficient System for Getting Better Grades in Less Time. She will be speaking on the best study skills for 21st century learners.

    Make a dateMake a date: Find out more, and register, for the webcast
    The website lists the time in US Pacific Daylight time as 5PM on 23rd, which is on the 24th October for Australia. At 11AM for those in NSW & Victoria; 10AM in Queensland; 10:30AM in South Australia and 8AM in Western Australia

  • Education

    Webinar on cloud privacy and data sovereignty

    • 2 Comments

    image

    The benefits of cloud computing for public sector organisations run right across the public sector, including education. 
    But as executives explore the opportunities, they often become concerned about data security and the privacy risks associated with online services – and justifiably so.

    We’re running a webinar tomorrow (12 March) at 2PM AEDT, where we’ll tackle the sensitive issue of data privacy head-on to reveal both the potential pain points and how your organisation can mitigate the risks.

    The ability to offer new services. The potential to improve operating efficiencies. Deepening customer engagement. There’s no disputing the upside of the cloud. But balancing individual privacy, corporate security and state sovereignty in this brave new world can prove challenging. In the webinar, our cloud experts will:

    • Explore the potential risks cloud computing presents
    • Share our experience in how real the risks are
    • Offer insights on how to overcome them
    • Reveal what’s needed to undertake a cloud-risk assessment – and how to share your findings with managers

    Two senior Microsoft Australia employees will share their experiences of compliance and security, explain the impact of cloud computing and shed light on data privacy, security and sovereignty.

    imageJames Kavanagh

    Chief Security Officer, Microsoft Australia
    imageShaun Tipson

    Senior Attorney, Microsoft Australia

    The webinar runs tomorrow, Weds 12 March, at 2PM AEDT.

    Register now for the Cloud webinar on 12 March 2014

  • Education

    Developing education solutions in Office 365

    • 2 Comments

    With so many education customers using Office 365 globally (now in the tens of millions of education uses), there's continuing interest by developers in creating services for customers, running on top of Office. This could mean developing an app for Word, Excel, PowerPoint; or could be developing a system that uses the Office 365 cloud service to deliver an integrated solution.

    Office Dev Centre logoThe team responsible for this at Microsoft are very busy releasing new information and features for developers. You can read about these in the constant updates from the Developer stream on the Office Blogs. And to help a little more, here’s some of the key bits of news that I’ve noticed recently:

    On Demand Training for Office 365 developers 
    I’m a big fan of the Microsoft Virtual Academy, as it contains some excellent technical training that is free and available at any time to technical users and developers. There’s a new course, Introduction to Office 365 Development available, which contains modules on developing Apps for Office and Apps for SharePoint, and a session on the Office 365 APIs that are available for developers to use to more closely integrate to Office across different devices.

    Office 365 APIs Starter Projects for Windows
    There’s a series of samples that the team have created which allows developers to quickly spin up projects that interact with Office 365 using the standard APIs. It lets you do things like create, read, update and delete events in a user’s calendar (so you could add an assignment reminder function to an LMS, to automatically put the assignment into the student’s calendar, and that will then show up on their PC/phone etc). Similar samples allow you to create, read, update and delete files on their SharePoint site

    Office 365 Developer Podcast
    If you want to keep up to date with less reading, then there’s the Office 365 Developer Podcast, where Jeremy Thake talks with people involved with developing Office 365 apps – both within and outside of Microsoft.

    The Office Dev Centre has also been completely updated, with easier access to resources, recordings of events and code samples.

  • Education

    Integrating Microsoft Office 365 Education with Desire2Learn Learning Environment

    • 2 Comments

    One of the futures of Learning Management Systems is as a key bridge, building integration between different systems within an education institution. In the future, it’s unlikely that we’re going to see a single monolithic system that solves every elearning challenge, but instead a set of best-of-class components effectively interconnected.

    imageOne example is the integration between a Learning Management System (LMS) and the communication and productivity services that an institution uses - in this case, between the Brightspace* D2L Learning Environment and Office 365. It means that students and staff can use their core email, collaboration, communication and productivity suite, whilst within their LMS.

    Through their integration solutions, the Desire2Learn Learning Environment and Microsoft Office 365 services (email, calendar, & more) improve how students and teachers interact online. Institutions can choose any of the integration solutions appropriate to their users.

    The starting point is a single sign on, so that your users don’t have to logon to multiple systems, but then you can go further - opening documents through Office Online, enabling email processes from within your LMS etc

    The Desire2Learning team have published a big set of documentation and resources on the Desire2Learn website.

    Find MoreGet more info in the Desire2Learn "Office 365 integration Technical Guide"

     

    * Brightspace is the new brand name for the Desire2Learn learning products

  • Education

    Sway–a unique way to present ideas and information

    • 2 Comments

    imageYesterday, the Office team introduced a brand new app to the Office portfolio – called Sway, and as the team say on the Sway blog:

      Sway is an entirely different way to express yourself and bring your ideas to life. When your ideas are born, you want to explore, visualize and share them—quickly and easily, wherever you happen to be, and on whatever device you have. You want your ideas to be understood. Sway helps you do just that. It’s a new way for you to create a beautiful, interactive, web-based expression of your ideas, from your phone or browser. It is easy to share your creation and it looks great on any screen. Your ideas have no borders, edges, page breaks, cells or slides. Your mind is a continuous canvas, and Sway brings this canvas to life. Sway helps you focus on the human part: your ideas and how they relate to each other. Sway takes care of the design work—a Sway is ready to share with the world as soon as it is born.  

    There’s a really good Sway video from the team that shows the vision of what they are creating:

    You can read all of the details on the Sway blog, take a look at some sample, and use the links to sign up for the preview version of Sway.

    imageBut to whet your appetite, let me give you an idea of what’s possible with Sway for a complete novice! I created a Sway this afternoon, using a whitepaper I’ve been working on as a starting point. I’ve had no training, but just got stuck in and had a go at creating one. And I think the result is pretty impressive – even more so when you look at it on different devices, and see how it dynamically changes the layout to work on a big PC screen and a small phone screen! I couldn’t imagine how much effort I would have needed before today to create the same high-quality experience.

    Learn MoreView my Sway on Student Attrition in Australian Universities here

     

    What could you do with Sway? Publishing lesson notes? Getting students to create Sways instead of PowerPoints of their work? Publishing university research in a consumer-friendly format?

  • Education

    A Windows 8 tablet for under $90?

    • 2 Comments

    This seems incredible to me! Coles have a 7” Windows 8 touch tablet, with Office 365 Personal, for $89.

    Pendo%20Pad%207

    It’s just one of a few surprises that I have seen this year, as more and more low-cost laptops, tablets and convertibles (tablets with detachable keyboards) have been appearing. But I never expected a tablet under $100 with Office 365 included (which means it also comes with 1TB OneDrive online storage and 60 monthly Skype minutes).

    My daughter’s school is going BYOD for next year, and I’d already decided that I was going to invest in a Surface Pro 3 for her (because of the power of the pen, and because since I got my Surface Pro, it’s made a massive difference to my own notetaking). But my concern was that she may not look after it and it would end up being dragged around without its case.

    But seeing the $89 Pendo Pad in Coles, and then watching Top Gear over the weekend, I’ve hit on the perfect plan! She’s going to be receiving a Surface Pro 3 and a Pendo Pad. The Surface will be her main device, and the Pendo Pad is for some lightweight reading, surfing and Skype. But if the Surface gets damaged, then the Pendo Pad is going to be her main machine whilst the Surface is out of action.

    I got this inspired idea from Top Gear, where the lads are tailed on their journeys in top marque sports cars by a driver in a surprisingly ordinary car. And if they break down, they are forced to switch into the backup car. Imagine the shame of ditching the Ferrari for a 2 door hatchback. Hoping that same challenge will work for my daughter.

    See you at Coles Smile

Page 4 of 79 (786 items) «23456»