This question came up on an internal C# alias, and I thought the answer would be of general interest. That's assuming that the answer is correct - it's been quite a while.

The .NET IL language provides both a call and callvirt instruction, with the callvirt being used to call virtual functions. But if you look through the code that C# generates, you will see that it generates a "callvirt" even in cases where there is no virtual function involved. Why does it do that?

I went back through the language design notes that I have, and they state quite clearly that we decided to use callvirt on 12/13/1999. Unfortunately, they don't capture our rationale for doing that, so I'm going to have to go from my memory.

We had gotten a report from somebody (likely one of the .NET groups using C# (thought it wasn't yet named C# at that time)) who had written code that called a method on a null pointer, but they didn’t get an exception because the method didn’t access any fields (ie “this” was null, but nothing in the method used it). That method then called another method which did use the this point and threw an exception, and a bit of head-scratching ensued. After they figured it out, they sent us a note about it.

We thought that being able to call a method on a null instance was a bit weird. Peter Golde did some testing to see what the perf impact was of always using callvirt, and it was small enough that we decided to make the change.