Erika Ehrli - Adventures with Office Products & Technologies
MSDN & TechNet: Releasing Office, SharePoint, Exchange & Lync Centers and content for developers and IT professionals.
 

  • Erika Ehrli - Adventures with Office Products & Technologies

    Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010 Launch: A Summary of Technical Content that Matters to Developers

    • 3 Comments

    Oh my! The day is finally here! We have been working for months on producing and releasing technical content that matters to developers. So many steps and multiple people at Microsoft and the developer community have contributed heavily to the Office and SharePoint 2010 launch. Today is the happy day when we get to take it all live.

    Many of you enjoyed the content we released during Beta, so we updated most of it and created more for Launch.

    I realize each one of this projects deserves a blog entry, but since you all can’t wait to know about the recently released content, here goes my summary of technical content for developers that we just published on MSDN. This should matter to everyone interested in taking a deep dive into developing solutions with Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010.

    Office 2010

    Updated MSDN Office Developer Center

     MSDN Office Developer Center

    Find quick links to developer content for Office 2010 and 2007 Microsoft Office system products and technologies.

    We updated our top pages and added links to a lot of Office 2010 content that we just published. Don’t miss product specific content from the following pages:

  • Access Developer Center
  • Excel Developer Center
  • InfoPath Developer Center
  • Office Fluent User Interface Developer Center
  • Open XML Developer Center
  • Outlook Developer Center
  • Project Developer Center
  • Visio Developer Center
  • Word Developer Center
  • Updated Office 2010 Developer Center

    Office 2010 Developer Center

    This page points you to Office 2010 innovations that matter to developers and features Office 2010 and recently published content.

    Get Started Developing with Office 2010

    Developing with Office 2010 

    Find application compatibility tools, how-to videos, articles, references, and more in this getting started training.

    Office 2010 is a broadly extensible platform for building information worker productivity solutions and developing for Office with Visual Studio 2010 makes this easy. This seven modules initiatives show you how to get started developing with Office 2010 and present multiple videos including new Office 2010 Visual How-tos!

    Office 2010 and Visual Studio 2010

     Develop Solutions for Microsoft Office 2010

    Visual Studio 2010 includes new project templates for creating solutions that target both 32-bit and 64-bit versions of Microsoft Office 2010. Beth Massi and I worked on a series of Video How-tos for Office 2010 and Visual Studio 2010.

    What’s New in Office 2010?

     Office 2010 Product Guides

    Download the product guides for your favorite Microsoft Office programs. The guides were created by our Office MVPs. Each guide provides an at-a-glance overview, a closer look at many new and improved features, and instructions to help you find the features you want quickly and easily:

    Thanks Stephanie Krieger!

    SharePoint 2010

    Improved MSDN SharePoint Developer Center


    MSDN SharePoint Developer Center

    Find quick links to developer content for SharePoint Server 2010, SharePoint Foundation 2010, SharePoint Server 2007, and Windows SharePoint Services 3.0.

    We used to publish all the WSS 3.0 on this site. The SharePoint documentation teams worked on revamping the MSDN SharePoint Developer Center and turned it into the new home for SharePoint 2010 content as well. Here’s a few pages you should not miss:

    1. Products
    2. Learn
    3. Downloads
    4. Resource Centers
    5. My personal favorite: Developer Top 10 Resource Center. Thank you Randall!

    Getting Started with SharePoint 2010


    Get Started Developing on SharePoint 2010

    Are you an ASP.NET developer who is ready to learn more about SharePoint 2010? Visit the Getting Started page to view screencasts and hands-on labs about working with SharePoint 2010 developer features that are familiar to ASP.NET developers, such as web parts and workflow.

    Use these 10 modules to get started with development for SharePoint 2010 using Visual Studio 2010. We updated all the videos, hands-on labs, and added virtual labs and developer quick notes for some modules in this training. We also updated the Silverlight training control that displays all this content and enabled comments and social media sharing on our pages.

    SharePoint 2010 Advanced Developer Training

    SharePoint Advanced Developer Training
    SharePoint Advanced Developer Training

    If you are looking for black-belt content, this is it! For developers, SharePoint 2010 provides a business collaboration platform to rapidly build solutions and respond to business needs. SharePoint 2010 Advanced Developer Training offers technical training as self-paced modules and hosted labs for SharePoint 2007 professionals who want to upgrade their skills to SharePoint 2010. You can find a similar training for ITPros here: SharePoint 2010 Advanced IT Pro Training

     SharePoint Developer Tools in Visual Studio 2010

    Visual Studio 2010 includes new project templates for creating solutions that target SharePoint 2010 Solutions. Download a Visual Studio 2010 trial. Learn about SharePoint project creation, debugging, and solution deployment.

    Beth Massi and I worked on a series of Video How-tos for SharePoint 2010 and Visual Studio 2010.

    Finally, don’t miss the Launch Events!

    Office 2010 Launch Events

    Watch the keynote, join the virtual launch conversation, and participate in on-demand sessions for the global launch on May 12, starting at 11 a.m. EDT.

  • Erika Ehrli - Adventures with Office Products & Technologies

    Office 2010 How-Do I Videos for Developers

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    I uploaded a cool Word 2010 video to our Facebook group and people seemed to like it.

    Roganov Ivan made this request: “Only one video? I want more! 2010!”

    Done deal! We have about 20 more Office 2010 and about 30 SharePoint 2010 in the works now. Some more went live recently and were published to the MSN/Bing platform. You can find our recently published videos here:

    Note: Videos from MSN/BING are streamed and video quality is adjusted after a few seconds depending on your bandwidth. Eric White has a post that talks about this in more detail.

    Soon you will be able to find most of this videos featured at the MSDN Office Developer Center, the MSDN SharePoint Developer Center, and our new Facebook fan page.

    Enjoy!

  • Erika Ehrli - Adventures with Office Products & Technologies

    Open XML SDK 2.0 RTM is live! Find Articles, Videos, Code Samples, and Resources on MSDN

    • 1 Comments

    I’ve been incredibly passionate about Open XML since it’s early beginnings. I remember back in the day I was very excited about the possibility of generating .NET server-side Word, Excel, and PowerPoint documents. I also had the opportunity to manage the Open XML Format SDK 1.0 documentation release, design a poster, and I also wrote for a few years a series of blog posts and MSDN technical articles about Open XML, the SDK, and how to use it.

    Since then, the Open XML Format SDK has evolved significantly proving us a .NET API, documentation, and tools to help us simplify our task of generating documents programmatically.

    What is the Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office?

    The Open XML Format SDK 2.0  is a superset of the Open XML SDK 1.0. In addition to the functionality provided by the Open XML SDK 1.0, it leverages.NET Language-Integrated Query (LINQ) and provides classes to construct and query the contents of parts within a package. You can use functional construction for composing documents, and LINQ queries for extracting information from documents.

    The SDK is a collection of classes that let developers create and manipulate Open XML documents – documents that adhere to the Office Open XML File Formats Standard. Because the SDK provides an application program interface that lets developers manipulate Open XML documents directly, they can do so without the need for the Office client products themselves in both client and server operating environments.

    Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office offers a number of tools and resources to improve programmatic document processing thus making a task of the developer more efficient. The SDK also carries an interoperability improvements for open XML implementers as well as it is  designed to let Open XML developers build high performance client-side or server-side solutions that handle complex operations using only a small amount of program code.

    Microsoft has released an RTM version of Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office today. If you haven’t already, you can download it and find the online documentation versions here:

    ee402630.Download_lg(en-us,MSDN.10)[1] Download the Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office
    This download provides strongly typed part and content classes for use with Open XML documents. http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=c6e744e5-36e9-45f5-8d8c-331df206e0d0
    ee402630.Newsletter_lg(en-us,MSDN.10)[2] MSDN Online version of the Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office
    This reference provides strongly typed part and content classes to manipulate Open XML documents.
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb448854(office.14).aspx

    Distribution and requirement notes

  • Open XML SDK 2.0 is freely redistributable by any solution provider implementing the formats.
  • Office applications are not required to use the Open XML SDK 2.0, and no software purchase is required. Developers can freely use the Open XML SDK to build document processing solutions for Microsoft Office files and for other implementations of the IS29500 standard.

    Open XML content on MSDN

    I want to use the remainder of this post to provide you all with a run down of most popular Open XML programmability content and detailed links to MSDN Developer Portal pages where you can find lots of articles, videos, and code snippets.

    image 

    First, the Open XML Developer Center on MSDN provides you with a mix of community content, articles, learning, getting started, and technical content categorized by scenarios and technologies. Here are detailed links to all our top level entry pages:

    Downloads
    Learn Open XML
    | Getting Started
    | Articles
    | How Do I Videos
    | SDK
    | Training
    | Webcasts and Videos

    Scenarios
    Technologies
    | OPC
    | Excel
    | PowerPoint
    | Word
    Community

    image Second, take a look at our cool Open XML Developer Center on MSDN Silverlight rotator where you can find Open XML Essential resources including latest news about the Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office and community resources.
    image Next, I would like to suggest that you watch our recently published Deep Dive Open XML and the Open XML SDK SharePoint Conference session.

    Using Open XML 2.0 you can create and edit documents on the server without needing to resort to COM-based Office automation. This session presents a basic understanding of how to use Open XML 2.0 for creating documents, spreadsheets, and presentations. It also describes how to use the Open XML SDK and other various tools to make your development life easier. This session provides everything you need to start building document automation processes.

     

    Finally, if you want to take a deep dive into Open XML technical content, here’s a detailed list of most popular MSDN content:

    Book chapter:

    Book Excerpt: Chapter 22: Office Open XML Essentials

    Code samples:

    CG: Sample: Word 2007 Sample: Using Open XML to Improve Automation Performance in Word 2010 for Large Amounts of Data

    Sample: 2007 Office Sample: Building a Server-Side Document Generation Solution Using the Open XML Object Model

    Sample: 2007 Office Sample: Manipulating Office Open XML Format Files

    Sample: 2007 Office Sample: Using the Office Open XML Formats to Support Electronic Health Records Portability and Health Industry Standards

    CG: Sample: 2007 Office Sample: Introducing the Open XML Format External File Converter for Microsoft Office

    CG: Sample: 2007 Office Sample: Creating Documents by Using the Open XML Format SDK 2.0

    CG: Sample: 2007 Office Sample: Open XML File Formats Code Snippets for Visual Studio 2008 Using the Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office

    Columns:

    OfficeTalk: Creating Form Letters in Word by Using Bookmarks and Office Open XML Files

    OfficeTalk: Working with In-Memory Open XML Documents

    OfficeTalk: Programmatically Update Multiple External Data Connections in Excel 2007 by Using Open XML

    Downloads:

    Download: SharePoint 2010 Presentation: Deep Dive into Open XML 2.0 and the Open XML SDK 2.0

    Download: 2007 Office Presentations: Open XML Training Presentations

    Download: 2007 Office System Document: Open XML Developer Map

    Visual How-tos (how-to article + video + code sample):

    Visual How To: Building Word 2007 Documents Using Office Open XML Formats

    Visual How To: Embedding Documents in Word 2007 by Using the Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office

    Visual How To: Adding Images to Documents in Word 2007 by Using the Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office

    Visual How To: Generating Documents with Headers and Footers in Word 2007 by Using the Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office

    Visual How To: Merging Simple Content from Excel 2007 Workbooks and Worksheets by Using the Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office

    Visual How To: Merging PowerPoint 2007 Decks Together by Using the Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office

    Visual How To: Using the Open XML SDK 2.0 Classes Versus Using .Net XML Services

    Visual How To: Retrieving Content from Different Parts: Explicit or Implicit Relationships in the Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office

    Visual How To: Searching for Content in Word 2007 Documents by Using the Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office

    Visual How To: Generating a Word 2007 Document by Using PowerTools for Open XML and Windows PowerShell

    Visual How To: Creating a PowerPoint 2007 Presentation from a Folder of Images by Using the Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office

    Visual How-To: Using XSLT and Open XML to Create a Word 2007 Document

    Visual How To: Using XSLT and Open XML to Create a Word 2007 Document

    Visual How To: Displaying Open XML Spreadsheet Tables in the Browser Using Silverlight

    Technical articles:

    Creating Valid Open XML Documents by Using the Validation Tools in the Open XML Format SDK

    Introducing the Office (2007) Open XML File Formats

    Using the SharePoint Foundation 2010 Managed Client Object Model with the Open XML SDK 2.0

    Accepting Revisions in Open XML Word-Processing Documents

    Working with Numbered Lists in Open XML WordprocessingML

    Working with Numbered Lists in Open XML WordprocessingML

    Introducing the Open XML Format External File Converter for 2007 Office System SP2

    Editing Data in an Excel 2007 Open XML File with VBA

    Creating Documents by Using the Open XML Format SDK Version 2.0 CTP (Part 1 of 3)

    Creating Documents by Using the Open XML Format SDK 2.0 CTP (Part 2 of 3)

    Creating Documents by Using the Open XML Format SDK 2.0 CTP (Part 3 of 3)

    Using Office Open XML to Save Time Without Writing Code

    Taking the 2007 Office System Further with VBA and Open XML Formats

    Using Office Open XML to Customize Document Formatting in the 2007 Office System

    Getting More from Document Themes in the 2007 Office System with Office Open XML

    Creating Business Applications by Using Excel Services and Office Open XML Formats

    Creating a Simple Search and Replace Utility for Word 2007 Open XML Format Documents

    Using Office Open XML Formats to Support Electronic Health Records Portability and Health Industry Standards

    Creating Document Themes with the Office Open XML Formats

    Inserting Repeating Data Items into a Word 2007 Table by Using the Open XML API

    Building Server-Side Document Generation Solutions Using the Open XML Object Model (Part 1 of 2)

    Building Server-Side Document Generation Solutions Using the Open XML Object Model (Part 2 of 2)

    Manipulating Word 2007 Files with the Open XML Format API (Part 1 of 3)

    Manipulating Word 2007 Files with the Open XML Format API (Part 2 of 3)

    Manipulating Word 2007 Files with the Open XML Format API (Part 3 of 3)

    Manipulating Excel 2007 and PowerPoint 2007 Files with the Open XML Format API (Part 1 of 2)

    Manipulating Excel 2007 and PowerPoint 2007 Files with the Open XML Format API (Part 2 of 2)

    Open XML Bloggers

    The cherry on the pie: I also want to provide you links to Microsoft blogs where you can find more news about the latest release of the Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office:

    Enjoy the RTM version of the SDK and have fun with your document generation scenarios and solutions.

  • Erika Ehrli - Adventures with Office Products & Technologies

    SharePoint Conference 2009 Developer Videos and Slide Decks on MSDN

    • 3 Comments

    Some developers asked if we could publish some SPC videos and slide decks after the conference on MSDN. While we can’t publish all the conference content, we were able to cherry pick most popular sessions and publish a selection of most popular Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010 develop SPC videos and slide decks.

    Here’s our selection of most popular sessions:

    Office 2010 Videos | SharePoint Conference 2009

    Office 2010 has many new developer oriented features. As a Microsoft Office developer, you can create highly refined user experiences that reduce complexity for users and make them instantly more productive. The following five videos represent a selection of most popular Office developer track sessions from the SharePoint Conference 2009.

    SharePoint 2010 Videos | SharePoint Conference 2009

    SharePoint 2010 has many new developer oriented features. Developers can build collaboration applications on the platform features of Microsoft SharePoint 2010, the new tools for SharePoint 2010 make developers more productive, and new hosting options for SharePoint solutions provide more flexibility in deployment. The following five videos represent a selection of most popular SharePoint developer track sessions from the SharePoint Conference 2009.

    Enjoy!

  • Erika Ehrli - Adventures with Office Products & Technologies

    MSDN Office and SharePoint Developer Centers are wearing a new skin!

    • 0 Comments

    Someone recently asked me (in Twitter) if I was keeping some nice stories in draft and waiting for things to go live to push the “publish” button in my blog, Twitter, and Facebook. The answer is yes! I am keeping a lot in draft mode. This is why I keep saying that this are exciting times for Office and SharePoint developers.

    There’s few things for Microsoft people that bring more happiness than approaching RTM and start talking. As we get closer to that day, our team decided to start releasing new content and improved experiences for MSDN sites.

    Today I want to share that a few minutes ago we re-launched the MSDN Office Developer Center and the MSDN SharePoint Developer Center with a new skin that matches our Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010 branding.

    This is the first time that Office and SharePoint MSDN sites blend with the product brand. Although this is only a visual update, it sets an exciting new look as we prepare for RTM.

    image

    image

    Take a look yourself and see the nice difference made possible thanks to our new branded skin.

    Who said developers don’t like pretty?

    Enjoy!

  • Erika Ehrli - Adventures with Office Products & Technologies

    MSDN Office and SharePoint in Facebook and Twitter

    • 0 Comments

    Our social media community is growing and we want to provide better support and more features to our followers. We are moving from a Facebook Group to a Facebook Fan Page.

    This will allow us to provide more frequent updates including news to developer content released weekly.

    Please follow us and become a fan of MSDN Office and SharePoint Developer Centers in Facebook.

     We'll be closing down the group, so please become a fan of our page http://www.facebook.com/pages/MSDN-Office-and-SharePoint-Developer-Centers/321737938338 and tell your friends.

    You can also find us in Twitter here: http://twitter.com/msdn_office

  • Erika Ehrli - Adventures with Office Products & Technologies

    Office and SharePoint 2010 Developer: RSS Feeds

    • 0 Comments

    The following RSS feeds are now live with headlines from July 1, 2009 to February 19, 2010. The feeds include headlines for all of the Office and SharePoint Getting Started content, as well as the Channel 9 learning courses for SharePoint and Office.

     dd183105.rss_button(en-us,MSDN.10)[2]MSDN: Microsoft Office Developer Center

    http://www.microsoft.com/feeds/msdn/en-us/office/rss.xml

     dd183105.rss_button(en-us,MSDN.10)[2]MSDN: Microsoft Office 2010

    http://www.microsoft.com/feeds/msdn/en-us/office/rss2010.xml

     dd183105.rss_button(en-us,MSDN.10)[2]MSDN Office: Community Submitted Content

    http://www.microsoft.com/feeds/msdn/en-us/office/communitycontent.xml

     dd183105.rss_button(en-us,MSDN.10)[2]MSDN: Microsoft Office Developer Center - Video

    http://www.microsoft.com/feeds/msdn/en-us/office/video.xml

     dd183105.rss_button(en-us,MSDN.10)[2]MSDN: Microsoft SharePoint Developer Portal

    http://www.microsoft.com/feeds/msdn/en-us/sharepoint/rss.xml

     dd183105.rss_button(en-us,MSDN.10)[2]MSDN: Microsoft SharePoint 2010

    http://www.microsoft.com/feeds/msdn/en-us/sharepoint/rss2010.xml

    And here’s a monthly recap of MSDN Office and SharePoint content published, with a spike in October and November:

    clip_image004

    The feeds will be dynamically pulled into multiple MSDN Developer Centers, as well as serve as the baseline for our Twitter and Facebook feeds.

    Subscribe to this feeds and keep up with all the latest developer news about Office and SharePoint 2010.

  • Erika Ehrli - Adventures with Office Products & Technologies

    Extending the Outlook Social Connector

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    I am one of those persons who has 25 apps running at the same time. I always have multiple instances of Explorer, VS, Office docs, and other apps running at all times. The one app I never close and I frequently visit is Outlook.

    One of the neat new additions to Outlook 2010 is the the Outlook Social Connector (OSC). The Microsoft Outlook Social Connector is an add-in that surfaces social network data including friends, profiles, activities, and status information from social networks in Microsoft Outlook.

    I really like the idea of bringing a lot of updates from multiple social networks sites where I have multiple personal and MSDN Office accounts to the one app where I spend a great deal of my day: Outlook.

    Microsoft announced yesterday the availability of the Microsoft Outlook Social Connector (OSC) Beta (February Update) and a refresh about partnering with LinkedIn, Facebook, and MySpace.

    You can download the latest version of the Outlook Social Connector from the Microsoft Download Center.  Please be sure to read the detailed instructions and if necessary remove the earlier Outlook Social Connector Beta.  (More details are here)

    What’s more cool about the Outlook Social Connector is that you can extend it. In addition to LinkedIn, Facebook, and Myspace providers, you’ll also be able to write your own.

    This diagram shows the Outlook Social Connector provider architecture:

    Ee829696.a4167918-433d-4f74-a6dc-d58fc3c46b10(en-us,office.14)[1]

    If you are a developer and you are interested in extending the Outlook Social Connector, I recommend that you check this blogs, articles, and resources:

    1. MSDN article: Developing an Outlook Social Connector Provider: This article discusses the interfaces that a Microsoft Outlook Social Connector provider (OSC provider) must implement. The OSC provider extensibility interfaces provide a way for disparate social networks to show friend, activity, and relationship information in Outlook. An OSC provider component must implement the ISocialProvider, ISocialSession, ISocialProfile, and ISocialPerson interfaces. These interfaces expose methods and properties that allow the OSC to communicate with a social network independently of the APIs provided by the social network.
    2. Download sample code: ODC Provider Templates: Outlook Sample: Outlook Social Connector Provider: This project contains a sample Outlook Social Connector provider and several provider templates (in C++, C#, and Visual Basic) for Microsoft Outlook 2010 Beta, Microsoft Office Outlook 2007, and Microsoft Office Outlook 2003.
    3. Blog: Angela Chu-Hatoun (WONG) has a great blog post oriented not so much for the end user but for the developer who might want to develop an OSC provider for a social network site.
    4. Blog: Outlook Team blog: Developing a provider for the Outlook Social Connector

    Additionally, as mentioned by Stephen Griffin, later on the Outlook team will be shipping the OSC as an add-in for Outlook 2007 and 2003, so you can get all that social goodness even if you’re not yet on Outlook 2010!

  • Erika Ehrli - Adventures with Office Products & Technologies

    New: Office Developer Atlas

    • 1 Comments

    The Office Product Marketing group has released a new Silverlight-based training set to introduce you to developer investments in 2010 including VBA, Fluent UI, and the Office Backstage.

    The app was released yesterday to MSDN and you can access it from this link:

    http://www.microsoft.com/resources/msdn/en-us/office/media/Atlas/Default.html

    I’ll update this post with a link to an MSDN Dev Center landing page with more info as soon as it’s live.

    In the meantime, here’s more info cross-posted from John Durant’s blog:

    The Office Developer Atlas interactive training tool (built using Silverlight technology) is a great way for you to come up to speed on what developing productivity solutions with Office is all about. We've called it an atlas because it's designed to give you a series of training segments that help you orient yourself in the world of Office development.

    OfficeDeveloperAtlas0[1]

    The first three segments that we have included in the initial release of Office Developer Atlas include:

    1) Making users instantly productive through VBA

    2) The Microsoft Office Backstage view

    3) The Microsoft Office Fluent UI (Ribbon)

    In each section, you'll find a short explanatory video, an example that demonstrates the kinds of solutions you can build with the targeted technology, and links to rich content on how to convert your awareness to technical skill. Here are a couple more screenshots:

    OfficeDeveloperAtlas1[1]

    OfficeDeveloperAtlas2[1]

    We'll be adding more modules to the training environment, and all you need is a Web browser to start using it. Enjoy, and please send your feedback and ideas for more training modules.

  • Erika Ehrli - Adventures with Office Products & Technologies

    Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010 Blogs of Notice <OPML/>

    • 1 Comments

    Blogs are super fun! Many product teams for Office and SharePoint are blogging about new features added to the 2010 release.

    Here’s some blogs I recommend following:

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    <outline text="Microsoft Office 2010 Engineering" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.technet.com/office2010/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="The Office Blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.office.com/b/MainFeed.aspx?Type=BlogsOnly" />
            <
    outline text="Access Team Blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/access/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="Excel Team Blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/excel/rss.xml" />
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    outline text="Excel Services" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/cumgranosalis/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="Outlook Team Blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/outlook/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="Ryan's Look at Outlook Programmability" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/rgregg/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="Exchange API" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/exchangedev/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="Word Team Blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/microsoft_office_word/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="InfoPath Team Blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/infopath/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="Project Team Blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/project/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="Project Programmability" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/project_programmability/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="PowerPoint Team Blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/powerpoint/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="Visio Team Blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/visio/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="PerformancePoint Team Blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/performancepoint/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="BCS Team Blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/bcs/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="Office Client Developer Content and Resources" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/officedevdocs/rss.xml" />
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    outline text="Brian Jones and Zeyad Rajabi: Office Solutions" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/brian_jones/rss.xml" />
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    outline text="John R. Durant's: Office Development" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/johnrdurant/rss.xml" />
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    outline text="Gray Knowlton: Office Development" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.technet.com/gray_knowlton/rss.xml" />
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    outline text="Doug Mahugh: Office Interoperability" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/dmahugh/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="Eric White: Open XML" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/ericwhite/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="Frank Rice: Fluent UI, Backstage, and Open XML" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/frice/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="SharePoint Team Blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/sharepoint/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="Randall Isenhour: SharePoint Content and Resources" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/randalli/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="Andrew May: Discussion from a Documentation Point of View" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/andrew_may/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="SharePoint Developer Documentation Team Blog" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/sharepointdeveloperdocs/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="Arpan Shaw" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/arpans/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="Paul Andrew: SharePoint Development" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/pandrew/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="Paul Stubbs: OBA, SharePoint, and Channel 9" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/pstubbs/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="Steve Fox: OBA" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/steve_fox/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="Donovan Follette: OBA, Office, and Channel 9" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/donovanf/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="Erika Ehrli: MSDN, Office and SharePoint Development" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.msdn.com/erikaehrli/rss.xml" />
            <
    outline text="Office Global Experience" type="rss" xmlUrl="http://blogs.technet.com/office_global_experience/rss.xml" />
        </
    body>
    </opml>

    ee402630.opml_trans(en-us,MSDN.10)[1] Download this OPML

    You can easily download and import this OPML to Outlook 2007 or Outlook 2010:

    image

    image

    image

    dd183105.rss_button(en-us,MSDN.10)[2] Also, if you are interested, here’s a previous post with pointers to RSS feeds for Office and SharePoint developers.

  • Erika Ehrli - Adventures with Office Products & Technologies

    What’s New for Developers in Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010?

    • 0 Comments

    The upcoming release of Office and SharePoint offers a wealth of interesting new scenarios and solutions that can be built thanks to new features and improvements added to different Office and SharePoint products and technologies. There’s more possibilities to integrate Office and SharePoint to build rich client-server solutions using tools such as Visual Studio 2010, SharePoint Designer 2010, InfoPath 2010, and Access 2010.

    Some of you already had an opportunity to play with the Betas and write code, read lots of blogs, twitter feeds, and some MSDN articles and videos. Some others are eager to get the final release to start building solutions and are already starting to ramp-up. In either case, I realize there’s a lot of information out there already and it’s always helpful to get some advice on where to start.

    I find it fascinating to learn new technologies, and I truly enjoy working on training content and article plans. For those eager to learn as well, I’ll take you along with me on a joyride of learning what’s new for developers on Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010.

    I’ve spent the last months working in content plans for upcoming MSDN articles, Visual How-tos, and MSDN site projects. Happily, there’s already plenty articles, code samples, and videos on our publishing pipe to cover the most interesting features and scenarios. We started releasing some content in October after the SPC 2009 and in November for Beta. We have much more to come in the following months and it’s a great time to catch-up on blogging as there’s so much to share in the following months. This are exciting times for Office and SharePoint developers!

    With this blog post, I am starting a series of posts that will guide you through the most interesting 2010 features and resources available for developers. I’ll be tagging this series as learn2010.

    I’ll start by introducing the top places/content I recommend if you want to learn more about Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010 development.

     Developing with Office 2010

    Videos: The 5-10+ min intros

    Key Pillars of Office 2010 Development, the 3 + hours intro to Office 2010 development

    The links below provide videos, downloads, and technical articles specific to each pillar.

    Web sites and training content for developers

    Developing with SharePoint 2010

    Videos: The 5-10+ min intros

    Key Pillars of SharePoint 2010 Development, the 3 + hours intro to SharePoint 2010 development

    The links below provide videos, downloads, and hands-on labs specific to each pillar.

  • Getting Started: Building Web Parts in SharePoint 2010
  • What Developers Need to Know About SharePoint 2010
  • Building Blocks for Web Part Development in SharePoint 2010
  • Accessing SharePoint 2010 Data and Objects with Server-Side APIs
  • Accessing SharePoint 2010 Data and Objects with Client-Side APIs
  • Accessing External Data with Business Connectivity Services in SharePoint 2010
  • Developing Business Processes with SharePoint 2010 Workflows
  • Creating Silverlight User Interfaces for SharePoint 2010 Solutions
  • Sandboxed Solutions for Web Parts in SharePoint 2010
  • Creating Dialog Boxes and Ribbon Controls for SharePoint 2010

    Web sites and training content for developers

  • MSDN SharePoint Developer Center
  • SharePoint 2010 (Beta) Home Page
  • SharePoint 2010 Upgrade Resource Center
  • SharePoint 2010 Community
  • SharePoint 2010 Developer Workshop

    While generic, the links above can help you understand the big picture. As we approach the launch, I will be drilling-down into more detailed info about developing solutions using specific features pertaining to key pillars of Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010 development. I’ll try and share more videos, links to articles, pointers to interesting blog posts, and code samples for each piece so you can continue to learn more about features that you find particularly interesting.

  • Erika Ehrli - Adventures with Office Products & Technologies

    Getting Started with Office 2010 Development

    • 0 Comments

    It’s been an exciting week with all the recent announcements at PDC. Today, at PDC we announced the availability of our public Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010 Betas. Lots of developers from the community who have been monitoring the new developer investments on Office 2010 can start creating solutions with the latest features. You can find links to all our downloads here:

    Download the 2010 Betas

    Office 2010 Beta
    Office Professional Plus 2010 Beta

    Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, Outlook, Access, Publisher, InfoPath, Communicator, SharePoint Workspace, and Office Web Apps.

    You can learn more about the benefits of Office 2010 by downloading the beta from www.microsoft.com/2010

    Office 2010 Developer Content on MSDN

    Today, I am also happy to share the availability of our new Office 2010 developer pages on MSDN. We launched a few minutes ago a set of pages that provide Office 2010 developer learning resources including Channel 9 videos, developer references, articles, feeds to Office 2010 bloggers and community resources, and our very first three Office 2010 Visual How-to videos!

    We will start publishing more Office 2010 VHTs soon.

    Office 2010 (Beta) Developer Center

    We have updated our Office 2010 (Beta) Developer Center with more community content and links to developer specific resources. We will add more links to content and videos as we continue publishing.

    Developing with Office 2010

    Office 2010 Beta is a broadly extensible platform for building information worker productivity solutions and developing for Office with Visual Studio 2010 makes this easy. The following six key initiatives show you how to get started developing with Office 2010.

    image

    1 | Getting Started Developing with Office 2010

    2 | Extending the Office 2010 Backstage View and Other UI

    3 | Working with Office 2010 Data Through the File Formats and Office APIs

    4 | Integrating External Data and SharePoint 2010 Platform Services in Office 2010 Solutions

    5 | Creating Tracking Applications in Office 2010 and Publishing Them to SharePoint 2010

    6 | Using Office 2010 APIs to Customize Application Behavior and Automate Tasks

     

    I’m still developing Office 2007 solutions. Where can I find the content?

    We have modified our home page so you can find your way to both Office 2007 and Office 2010 developer content. We have a commitment to continue delivering and helping you discover Office 2007 content.

    image

    You should also check the Products tab to find your way to product and version specific developer content.

    image

    Check back often the MSDN Office Developer Center for the latest updates on Office 2010 development and follow us on Twitter for the latest news and twits for new content and cool stories about Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010 development.

    I’d also like to suggest you all read David Hale’s great post on Developer Help Updates for Office 2010 Beta!

    What about SharePoint 2010 developer content?

    In case you missed it, you can find detailed information about our recent SharePoint Conference release here:

    Also, check back often the MSDN SharePoint Developer Center for the latest updates on SharePoint 2010 development.

    Happy coding!

  • Erika Ehrli - Adventures with Office Products & Technologies

    Getting Started with SharePoint 2010 for Developers + New Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010 (Beta) Developer Centers

    • 1 Comments

    It’s always hard to stay away from blogging when there’s so many new things to share and talk about. Today at the SharePoint Developer Conference Keynote, Jeff Teper talked about SharePoint 2010 and Office 2010 features for developers and IT professionals. This is the time to start to blog more about the new release of Office and SharePoint and I am glad that we can all talk now!!!!

    The SharePoint team blog has a good summary of key announcements made today at the conference, so in case you missed the keynote, go check out this blog.

    Here’s a few more cool surprises from the MSDN Office and SharePoint Developer Center team.

    Getting Started with SharePoint 2010

    I had the opportunity to work closely with Paul Andrew, Martin Harwar, the MSDN team, and the SharePoint developer content team during the last few months on the new SharePoint 2010 Getting Started training on MSDN. We released this training a few minutes ago and you can all access it here:

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/sharepoint/ee513147.aspx

    The goal of this training is to show you how to get started with development for SharePoint 2010 using Visual Studio 2010.

    This training provides a Silverlight navigation experience that allows you to navigate between ten different learning tracks or modules and you can even test your skills.

    image

    Each module includes a set of videos, hands-on labs manuals in C# and VB, and a set code samples/snippets that you can also find in Paul Andrew’s blog.

    Here’s a list of all the different modules in this training:

    Module 1: Getting Started: Building Web Parts in SharePoint 2010

    Building Web Parts is one of the most common tasks you will undertake as a developer. SharePoint 2010 and Visual Studio 2010 enable you to create Web Parts quickly and easily. You can use project templates and project item templates to help you get started building standard ASP.NET Web Parts. You can also build a new type of Web Part called a Visual Web Part.

    In this module you will learn how to:

    • Create standard ASP.NET Web Parts for SharePoint 2010.
    • Create Visual Web Parts for SharePoint 2010.
    • Use SharePoint controls and data in Web Parts.

    Module 2: What Developers Need to Know About SharePoint 2010

    Visual Studio 2010 integrates with SharePoint much more closely than in previous versions. Visual Studio 2010 includes SharePoint-specific project types and project item types, and includes powerful packaging, deployment, and debugging features that help increase your efficiency as a SharePoint 2010 developer.

    In this module you will learn how to:

    • Create SharePoint 2010 projects by using Visual Studio 2010.
    • Create SharePoint 2010 project items by using Visual Studio 2010.
    • Package and deploy SharePoint 2010 solutions by using Visual Studio 2010.
    • Explore the SharePoint file system from Visual Studio 2010.
    • Create solutions that use the SharePoint 2010 object hierarchy.

    Module 3: Building Blocks for Web Part Development in SharePoint 2010

    SharePoint 2010 includes many components that help increase your efficiency as a developer. The SharePoint platform includes many built-in Web Parts that you can include in your solution, and provides many more components that you can use in Web Parts that you develop.

    In this module, you will learn how to:

    • Explore all of the built-in Web Parts provided by SharePoint 2010.
    • Configure built-in Web Parts provided by SharePoint 2010.
    • Use SharePoint controls in Web Parts that you develop.
    • Render data in Web Parts that you develop by using data controls.

    Module 4: Accessing SharePoint 2010 Data and Objects with Server-Side APIs

    Accessing SharePoint data in server-side solutions is one of the most common tasks that you will perform as a SharePoint developer. SharePoint 2010 provides powerful server-side APIs that enable you to retrieve, add, edit, and delete SharePoint data programmatically. SharePoint 2010 also includes the new LINQ to SharePoint technology that enables you to work with SharePoint data efficiently and easily.

    In this module you will learn how to:

    • Access SharePoint list data programmatically by using the SharePoint server-side APIs.
    • Use LINQ to SharePoint to access SharePoint list data programmatically.
    • Add files to SharePoint document libraries programmatically.
    • Modify files in SharePoint document libraries programmatically.
    • Create and work with content types programmatically.

    Module 5: Accessing SharePoint 2010 Data and Objects with Client-Side APIs

    SharePoint 2010 provides a new client object model that enables you to create SharePoint solutions that run remotely from the SharePoint server farm. For example, the client object model enables you to consume and manipulate SharePoint data in Windows Forms applications, Windows Presentation Framework applications, console applications, Microsoft Silverlight applications, and ASP.NET Web applications.

    In this module you will learn how to:

    • Develop Microsoft .NET Framework applications by using the client object model for SharePoint 2010.
    • Develop Silverlight applications by using the client object model for SharePoint 2010.
    • Access SharePoint data in .NET Framework and Silverlight applications.

    Module 6: Accessing External Data with Business Connectivity Services in SharePoint 2010

    SharePoint 2010 provides a new set of technologies known as Business Connectivity Services for retrieving, editing, updating, and deleting data from external systems. This module provides an overview of Business Connectivity Services, and delves into development examples of using Business Connectivity Services data in custom SharePoint solutions.

    In this module you will learn how to:

    • Create Business Connectivity Services applications.
    • Create and use external content types.
    • Create .NET Types for Business Connectivity Services applications.

    Module 7: Developing Business Processes with SharePoint 2010 Workflows

    SharePoint 2010 provides a powerful workflow framework that enables you to implement custom business processes that are driven by SharePoint data.

    In this module, you will learn how to:

    • Create workflows for SharePoint 2010 solutions.
    • Create workflow events for SharePoint 2010 solutions.
    • Create workflow forms for SharePoint 2010 solutions.
    • Integrate external data with SharePoint workflows.

    Module 8: Creating Silverlight User Interfaces for SharePoint 2010 Solutions

    Silverlight 3.0 provides the opportunity for developers to create the next generation of Rich Internet Applications (RIAs). SharePoint 2010 integrates closely with Microsoft Silverlight to enable you to build compelling user interfaces that interact with SharePoint data.

    In this module you will learn how to:

    • Host Silverlight applications in SharePoint 2010.
    • Build Silverlight Web Parts.
    • Pass data from SharePoint to Silverlight by using Silverlight parameters.
    • Render SharePoint data in Silverlight by using the SharePoint client object model.
    • Render media files from SharePoint in Silverlight applications.

    Module 9: Sandboxed Solutions for Web Parts in SharePoint 2010

    SharePoint 2010 provides a new sandbox environment that enables you to run user solutions without affecting the rest of the SharePoint farm. This environment means that users can upload their own custom solutions without requiring intervention from administrators, and without putting the rest of the farm at risk.

    In this module you will learn how to:

    • Explore solution galleries.
    • Create Web Parts for sandboxed solutions.
    • Use sandboxed operations.
    • Differentiate between operations that are allowed in sandboxed solutions and those that are not.

    Module 10: Creating Dialog Boxes and Ribbon Controls for SharePoint 2010

    SharePoint 2010 provides new user interface components, such as server ribbons, and the new dialog platform. As a developer, you can create controls for the server ribbon and dialog boxes for the dialog platform.

    In this module, you will learn how to:

    • Explore the server ribbon.
    • Develop controls for the server ribbon.
    • Explore the dialog platform.
    • Develop solutions by using the dialog platform.

    New MSDN SharePoint 2010 (Beta) Developer Center and MSDN Office 2010 (Beta) Developer Center

    I am also glad to announce the availability of our new MSDN SharePoint 2010 and Office 2010 (Beta) Developer Centers. We will start adding more links to all the SharePoint 2010 and Office 2010 content we can now publish to these pages.

    Office 2010 (Beta) Developer Center
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/office/ee513173.aspx

    SharePoint 2010 (Beta) Developer Center
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/sharepoint/ee514561.aspx

    SharePoint 2010 Upgrade Resource Center
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/sharepoint/ee514557.aspx

    SharePoint 2010 Community
    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/sharepoint/ee633451.aspx

    You can also find links to all the recently SharePoint 2010 developer content published at the SharePoint Developer Docs team blog.

    Enjoy!

  • Erika Ehrli - Adventures with Office Products & Technologies

    MSDN Redesign: Office, SharePoint, and VSTO sites are live!

    • 0 Comments

    I know it’s late at night, but I couldn’t resist. The MSDN Office, SharePoint, and VSTO Developer Center are blue now and match the super cool new MSDN branding and experience. Go take a look and enjoy:

    Office Developer Center

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/office/default.aspx

    image

    SharePoint Developer Center

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/sharepoint/default.aspx

    image

    Office Development with Visual Studio Developer Center

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vsto/default.aspx

    image

    More sites here: http://blogs.msdn.com/lisa/archive/2009/10/17/msdn-com-refresh.aspx

    Office and SharePoint devs - See you in Las Vegas next week!

    I’ll be a the SharePoint Conference in Las Vegas next week. I will be at the Office developer booths at the following times:

    • Monday Oct 12 – 2:30PM- 5:45PM
    • Tuesday Oct 20 – 8:30AM – 10:30AM
    • Wednesday Oct 21 -  2:30PM – 5:45PM

    I’ll also be at the Office Developer and MSDN ATE tables.

    I’d love to talk to you about both the MSDN new experience, great content in the pipe, and all the latest news about Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010. I’ll be blogging more often now that I can talk (starting Monday).

    Also lookout for dev news in twitter: @msdn_office, @erikaec, and @sharepointdev.

    Let the Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010 dev stories begin!

  • Erika Ehrli - Adventures with Office Products & Technologies

    Getting Ready for Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010 + MSDN Redesign + New MSDN Open XML Developer Portal

    • 0 Comments

    It’s been a while since I had an opportunity to blog. When I am quiet it usually means I am up to something :).

    Getting Ready for Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010

    This are exciting times for Office and SharePoint developers. While we have released some interesting news about Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010 already, there’s a lot more coming for the SharePoint Developer Conference and Beta 2.

    We currently have more than 100 items in the publishing queue to be released between the SP Conference and after Beta 2, plus some great improvements and new pages being built for MSDN Office and MSDN SharePoint Developer Centers. Expect a lot of articles, videos, code samples, and more in the upcoming months.

    Moving forward I will focus more on blogging about Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010 for developers and will share related stories and links to others who are doing the same. Here are a few blogs that you should definitely follow if you are interested in developer documentation for Office and SharePoint:

    Office 2010 Developer Documentation and Code Samples

    SharePoint 2010 Developer Documentation and Code Samples

    Office 2010 & SharePoint 2010 Developer Documentation and Stories

    I’ll also be attending the SharePoint Developer Conference. It’s always refreshing to have an opportunity to talk to Office and SharePoint developers. I’ll be at the ATE tables and hanging out at the Office developer booths. Hope to see some of you there.

    MSDN Redesign

    While we work on 2010 content, we are also getting MSDN Office and MSDN SharePoint ready to be revamped with the new MSDN redesign. Scott Hanselman has already shared a preview of this look-and-feel in his blog. Here are a couple snapshots for your delight:

    MSDN_LOCH_HOME_thumb[1] lightframe_thumb[1]

    Soon MSDN Office and MSDN SharePoint will get this look. I particularly like that this new set of UI and improvements make the sites more community focused and looking as fresh and cool as the Expression site and the Silverlight site.

    This are also exciting times to work with the MSDN team. Scott will be blogging more about this project. If you are into MSDN, you should also check out the Inside MSDN & TechNet blog for more news about MSDN improvements.

    Revamped Open XML Developer Center

    If you are into Open XML like me, you may have noticed that in the last couple years we have published a lot more articles, Visual How-tos, and code samples for Open XML developers. We have mainly focused in writing more about the Open XML SDK 2.0.

    For that same reason, the Open XML Developer Center needed to grow and be organized in a way that would simplify discoverability of content and expose better ways to access content, including videos.

    image  image

    Because we didn’t want to wait until Beta 2 to release this site, we decided to take it live yesterday. Open XML SDK 2.0 developers are interested in finding more articles and guidance and we hope the improvements made to this site can simplify the time you spend learning Open XML and using the Open XML SDK 2.0.

    Here are the links that get you to all our new and redesigned pages.

    Home Page
    Downloads
    Learn Open XML
    | Getting Started
    | Articles
    | How Do I Videos
    | SDK
    | Training
    | Webcasts and Videos
    Scenarios
    Technologies
    | OPC
    | Excel
    | PowerPoint
    | Word
    Community

    These pages were optimized for the new MSDN redesign I discussed previously, so they will look even better once MSDN makes the switch to the new MSDN design.

    Eric White from my team owns the content of this portal and will be blogging soon about more details about this project.

    Looking forward to great times and to sharing new content for MSDN Office and MSDN SharePoint!

  • Erika Ehrli - Adventures with Office Products & Technologies

    Open XML SDK 2.0 August CTP, Videos, and 50+ Open XML Code Samples

    • 5 Comments

    Zeyad Rajabi announced this week the availability of the new Open XML SDK 2.0 August CTP. As mentioned by Zeyad, changes to this CTP include:

  • Add semantic level validation support
  • Add markup compatibility/extensibility support
  • General improvements based on your feedback
  • If you are into Open XML Development, you will also be interested in a few more videos and code samples.

    dd183105.video_30(en-us,MSDN.10)[2] Open XML SDK 2.0 Visual How-to Series

    We have released some videos, walkthroughs, and code sample downloads in the last couple weeks:

    Visual How To: Creating a PowerPoint 2007 Presentation from a Folder of Images by Using the Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office
    Visual How To: Merging Simple Content from Excel 2007 Workbooks and Worksheets by Using the Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office
    Visual How To: Using the Open XML SDK 2.0 Classes Versus Using .Net XML Services
    Visual How To: Merging PowerPoint 2007 Decks Together by Using the Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office
    Visual How To: Generating Documents with Headers and Footers in Word 2007 by Using the Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office
    Visual How To: Coding a Long-Running Operation Page in SharePoint Server 2007
    Visual How To: Embedding Documents in Word 2007 by Using the Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office
    Visual How To: Adding Images to Documents in Word 2007 by Using the Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office

    More to come soon.

    dd183105.development_30(en-us,MSDN.10)[2] Open XML SDK 2.0 for Microsoft Office Code Snippets for Visual Studio 2008

    I am also glad to announce that yesterday we published 50+ Open XML code samples packaged as Visual Studio code snippets. The code samples were created by Ken Getz as an update to the previous Open XML Visual Studio 2005 code snippets released a couple years ago. The previous snippets provided samples on manipulating document parts and packages using the System.IO.Packaging namespace. This new set provides more code samples that show how to manipulate document parts and packages using the Open XML SDK 2.0. The snippets were tested and work well with the August CTP released this week.

    You can download the snippets here:

    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=78bea298-a3f9-44cf-bde0-b4f30dc986df&displaylang=en

    The snippets in this download use the Open XML SDK 2.0 to accomplish many tasks involving Microsoft Excel 2007, Microsoft PowerPoint 2007, and Microsoft Word 2007 documents.

    You can use the enclosed code snippets with the Microsoft Visual Studio® 2008 Code Snippet Manager. Each snippet provides unique functionality that you can reuse within an application. This download provides snippets written in Microsoft Visual Basic.NET® and Microsoft C#® development languages.

    Here’s a list of all the snippets included in this package:

    Microsoft Office Excel Snippets

    Excel: Add custom UI

    Add custom ribbon markup to a specified workbook.

    Excel: Delete comments by user

    Delete comments from a workbook, given an author name. Pass an empty author name to delete all comments.

    Excel: Delete row

    Given a document name, a worksheet name, and a one-based row index, delete a row from the worksheet.

    Excel: Delete worksheet

    Delete the specified sheet from within the specified workbook.

    Excel: Delete XL4 macro sheets

    Given a document name delete all the XL4 macro sheets.

    Excel: Export chart

    Given a workbook and the name of a chart, export the chart to an XML file.

    Excel: Get all sheets

    Retrieve a List of all the sheets in a workbook.

    Excel: Get cell for reading

    Given a document name, a worksheet name, and a cell name, retrieve a reference to the cell for reading. Raise an exception of the cell doesn't exist.

    Excel: Get cell for writing

    Given a spreadsheet document, a sheet name and an address, return a reference to a cell ready to accept a value. Create the cell if necessary.

    Excel: Get cell format

    Given a document name, a worksheet name, and a cell name, return the CellFormat instance associated with the cell.

    Excel: Get cell value

    Given a document name, a worksheet name, and a cell name, get the value of the cell.

    Excel: Get cell value given row and column

    Rertrieve a cell value given its row and column numbers, or a row number and column name.

    Excel: Get column header

    Given a document name, a worksheet name, and a cell name, get the column of the cell and return the content of the first cell in that column.

    Excel: Get defined names

    Given a document name, return a dictionary of defined names.

    Excel: Get hidden rows or columns

    Given a document name, and a worksheet name, return a list of either hidden rows or columns.

    Excel: Get hidden worksheets

    Retrieve a list of all the hidden worksheets in a workbook.

    Excel: Get style border

    Retrieve information about a cell's border.

    Excel: Get style border info

    Get style border information.

    Excel: Get style fill

    Retrieve information about a cell's fill style.

    Excel: Get style fill information

    Retrieve specific font formatting information about a cell.

    Excel: Get style font information

    Retrieve specific font formatting information about a cell.

    Excel: Insert Custom XML

    Insert a custom XML part into a workbook.

    Excel: Insert header or footer

    Insert a header or footer into a workbook.

    Excel: Insert number into cell

    Given a file, a sheet, and a cell, insert a specified numeric value.

    Excel: Insert string into cell

    Given a document name, a worksheet name, a cell name, and a value, insert the text into the specified cell.

    Excel: Insert string into cell

    Insert a string into a specified cell.

    Excel: Set recalc option

    Given a file name, set the recalculation behavior of the workbook. Return the previous calc mode.

    Excel: Worksheet part by name

    Retrieve an entire worksheet part, given its name.

    Microsoft Office PowerPoint Snippets

    PowerPoint: Add comment

    Add a comment to the first slide in a presentation.

    PowerPoint: Delete all comments, by author

    Delete all comments in a PowerPoint presentation for a specific author. Pass an empty string for the author name to delete all comments.

    PowerPoint: Delete slide by title

    Given a presentation and a slide title, delete the slide.

    PowerPoint: Get List of Slide Titles

    Given a presentation file, retrieve a generic list of strings containing the slide titles. Some slide titles might be empty strings.

    PowerPoint: Get slide count

    Given a file name, retrieve the number of slides in the presentation.

    PowerPoint: Get slide index, by title

    Find the zero-based index of a slide within a presentation, given its title.

    PowerPoint: Reorder slides

    Given a PPT deck, an original position, and a new position, attempt to place the slide in the original position into the new position within the deck.

    PowerPoint: Replace image on slide

    Given a presentation, a slide title, and an image file, replace the first image on the selected slide with the new image.

    PowerPoint: Replace slide title

    Given a presentation, a slide title, and a new slide title, find the slide, and modify its title.

    Microsoft Office Word Snippets

    Word: Accept all revisions

    Given a document name and an author name, accept all revisions by the specified author. Pass an empty string for the author to accept all revisions.

    Word: Add Table

    Add a table, including text from an array, to the end of a document.

    Word: Convert DOCM to DOCX

    Convert a macro-enabled document to a standard document.

    Word: Delete all comments

    Given a document name and an author name, delete all comments by the specified author. Pass an empty string for the author to accept all revisions.

    Word: Delete headers and footers

    Delete headers and footers from a document.

    Word: Delete hidden text

    Delete hidden text from a document.

    Word: Extract Styles

    Extract the Styles part from a document, so you can insert it into another document.

    Word: Get application property

    Retrieve the value of an application property from a document.

    Word: Get Content Control

    Retrieve the markup for a specific content control.

    Word: Get core property

    Retrieve the value of a core property from a document.

    Word: Get custom property

    Retrieve a custom property for a document.

    Word: Replace the styles part

    Replace the entire styles part with a styles part extracted from another document.

    Word: Retrieve comments

    Retrieve all the comments from a document in an XDocument instance.

    Word: Retrieve Table of Contents

    Retrieve the table of contents markup, if it exists.

    Word: Set application property

    Given a document name, a property to set, and a value, update the document.

    Word: Set core property

    Set a core Word property (like Version, or LastModifiedBy).

    Word: Set custom property

    Given a document name, a property name/value, and the property type, add a custom property to a document.

    Word: Set print orientation

    Set the print orientation for each section in a document.

    Enjoy!

  • Erika Ehrli - Adventures with Office Products & Technologies

    Are you an Office Developer? Identify yourself as a member of the “Office Developer Guild”

    • 1 Comments

    This will be interesting for all of you who are into Office development: As Office developers, we can start identifying ourselves as active members of the community by joining the “Office Developer Guild” spearheaded by John Durant.

    The developer community for Microsoft Office grand and healthy. And, the knowledge and expertise in our community is pretty vast and deep. To make it easier for us to stay alert about events, up-coming content, etc. and more easily share ideas we now have the “Office Developer Guild”—a group of like-minded professional friends on Facebook. Additional benefits in the ODG include receiving announcements, slightly ahead of everyone else, of up-coming content, events, etc. That way you can tee up your own blog entries in advance! You’ll also receive exclusive messages from community leaders and insiders. As part of the on-going Office developer conversation I’ll be reaching out, asking questions, and soliciting feedback as well.

    Who can join? Anyone who is interested in how to developer productivity solutions with Microsoft Office. This includes Web, SharePoint, SQL Server, Exchange, VBA, XML and other developers--- all of these products & technologies are relevant.

    How to join? Search for my email on Facebook and request to be added: john.durant@microsoft.com. I’ll add you.

    Host the ODG image: Place the ODG “badge” on your site or blog so that you identify yourself as a member of the “the Guild”. Be sure to announce on the ODG wall that you are hosting the ODG image (shown below).

    mole3y[1]

    Blog, twitter, and help us spread the word

      Bookmark and Share

    Here’s a smaller version of the image that I am hosting on my blog:

    mole3y[1]

    <a href="http://blogs.msdn.com/johnrdurant/archive/2009/07/30/office-developer-guild-is-live.aspx"><img src="http://blogs.msdn.com/blogfiles/johnrdurant/WindowsLiveWriter/OfficeDeveloperGuildisLive_87FB/mole3y%5B1%5D_thumb.png" border="0" width="170" height="88" /></a>

    Hope you all join the “Office Developer Guild!”

  • Erika Ehrli - Adventures with Office Products & Technologies

    Get Started Resources for Fluent UI Extensibility + Download the New Office Developer Resources Ribbon Tab

    • 8 Comments

    I remember all the buzz generated when we announced the new Fluent UI (Ribbon) for Office 2007 applications. The Microsoft Office Fluent UI replaced the previous system of layered menus, toolbars, and task panes with a simpler system optimized for efficiency and discoverability. The new UI, including the Office Fluent Ribbon, provides improved context menus, enhanced screen tips, a Mini toolbar, and keyboard shortcuts that help to improve user efficiency and productivity.

    In Office 2007, the Fluent UI is implemented in several applications in the 2007 Microsoft Office suite, including Access, Excel, Outlook, PowerPoint, and Word. Fluent UI can be customized programmatically thanks to Fluent UI extensibility. MSDN has great articles, VHTs, and downloads that show you how to get started with Fluent UI extensibility.

    In Office 2010, the Fluent UI is available in more Office apps including Visio, InfoPath, Publisher, Outlook (improved), OneNote, and Project. Thanks to the expansion of Fluent UI to more products, developers will be able to provide more custom Fluent UI experiences. As explained by Brian Jones, in Office 2010 the Fluent UI extensibility story has been improved as well. We have added the ability for programmatically activating tabs in the Fluent UI. For example, you can now have your custom tabs behave like built in contextual tabs, where tabs only show when specific events are fired.

    Fluent UI extensibility resources

    If you are interested in learning more about Fluent UI extensibility and get ready for more Fluent UI programming in Office 2010, here’s a list of recommended resources:

    1. Office Fluent User Interface Developer Portal: This should be your first stop for all resources related to Fluent UI extensibility. This portal page provides technical articles, code samples, videos, Visual How-tos, and developer documentation on customizing the Office Fluent UI in the 2007 Microsoft Office release. Soon, we will have more resources for Office 2010.
    2. Customizing the 2007 Office Fluent Ribbon for Developers (Part 1 of 3): Learn how to customize the 2007 Office Fluent user interface. Also learn how new features in Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Tools for the 2007 Microsoft Office System support RAD development of Ribbon customizations.
    3. Customizing the 2007 Office Fluent Ribbon for Developers (Part 2 of 3):This article is the companion to the part one and part three articles of the same name. This article contains detailed reference material about the controls and method signatures of the Ribbon user interface.
    4. Customizing the 2007 Office Fluent Ribbon for Developers (Part 3 of 3): This article is the companion to the part one and part two articles of the same name. This article contains a list of frequently asked questions regarding the Microsoft Office Fluent user interface.
    5. Office System Document: Lists of Control IDs: Download files that list the control IDs for built-in controls in all applications that use the Office Fluent Ribbon.
    6. 2007 Office System Document: UI Style Guide for Solutions and Add Ins: Download guidelines for creating a consistent end-user experience based on the design of the 2007 release of Microsoft Office suites.
    7. Visual Studio Code Snippets for the Office Fluent UI: This download includes Microsoft Visual Basic and Microsoft Visual C# code snippets for use when customizing Microsoft Office Excel 2007, Microsoft Office PowerPoint 2007, and Microsoft Office Word 2007.

    Also, check out the Fluent UI resource centers on TechNet and Office Online.

    Download the New Office Developer Resources Ribbon Tab

    MSDN Office Developer Center (ODC) provides a developer roadmap to understand and work with Office System programs, servers, services, tools and technologies. Since we are developers, we thought it would be great to provide a Office Developer Resources Ribbon Tab that you can download for free.  Frank Rice created a super cool Visual Basic .NET shared add-in in Visual Studio that creates a tab on the Word 2007 Ribbon. 

    image

    This Ribbon tab provides quick access to developer sites on MSDN for Office and SharePoint, as well as a rich set or organized links to Get Started, MSDN Library, Learn, Community, Forums and Support resources that matter to Office/SharePoint developers.

    This is a useful tool for anyone interested in getting quick access to Office and SharePoint developer resources from a frequently used application like Word. Also, if you are into blogging from Word or writing technical documentation related to Office or SharePoint, this a tool that simplifies navigation and discoverability to most popular developer resources. Finally, this is just another great sample of the detailed level of customization you can get with Fluent UI extensibility.

    Frank Rice has created most of the developer content we have about Fluent UI extensibility on MSDN and he is considered our expert in Fluent UI development. Frank shares in his blog post the code and process he followed to create this Ribbon. You can download this free add-in at: http://code.msdn.microsoft.com/OfficeDevResourceTab/. Kudos to Frank for this great sample.

    Enjoy!

  • Erika Ehrli - Adventures with Office Products & Technologies

    What’s New in Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010 (Technical Preview post)

    • 7 Comments

    I was out of town and had to miss the excitement of blogging about the launch of the Office Technical Preview yesterday. Lucky me, today I have tons of links and trackbacks to other blog posts to share!

    What’s New in Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010?

    Yesterday, Stephen Elop announced the technical preview milestone for Microsoft Office 2010 at the WorldWide Partner Conference.

    From the Press Pass:

    Office 2010 and related products will deliver innovative capabilities and provide new levels of flexibility and choice that will help people:

    • Work anywhere with Office Web applications — the lightweight Web browser versions of Word, PowerPoint, Excel and OneNote — that provide access to documents from virtually anywhere and preserve the look and feel of a document regardless of device.
    • Collaborate better with co-authoring in Microsoft Word 2010, Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 and Microsoft OneNote 2010, and advanced e-mail management and calendaring capabilities in Microsoft Outlook 2010, including the option for users to ”ignore” unwanted threads.
    • Bring ideas to life with video and picture editing, broadcast capability in Microsoft PowerPoint 2010, easy document preparation through the new Microsoft Office Backstage view, and new Sparklines in Microsoft Excel 2010 to visualize data and spot trends more quickly.

    Read more here: http://www.microsoft.com/presspass/press/2009/jul09/07-13Office2010WPCPR.mspx

    What’s new in….

    What’s new for developers in Office 2010 and SharePoint 2010 (TP)?

    Office 2010 Roadmap (TP)
    Tools productivity UI Platform Application Extensibility
    • Fluent UI (Ribbon) support added to more products
    • Backstage view and context menu programmability support
    • Excel “slicers” and “sparklines” extensibility
    • Word, OneNote, PowerPoint, Visio, and Outlook enriched APIs.
    • Improved Outlook object model 

    Read more details at John Durant’s great post.

    SharePoint 2010 Roadmap (TP):
    • Visual Studio 2010 SharePoint tool
    • Language Integrated Query to SharePoint
    • Developer Dashboard
    • Business Connectivity Services
    • Client Object Model
    • Silverlight Web Part

    Read more details at Paul Andrew’s post and at the Developer Sneak peek video:

    Office and SharePoint development blogs:

    More links and resources:

    Availability to the Technical Preview program is “by invitation only” and is not broadly available to the public.  There is a waitlist you can sign up for, found here.

    I’ll keep updating this blog entry as I hear more.

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