Looking for a way to interact around data – take a look at the MSR DataDepot, a place to communicate around datasets – essentially bringing together the idea of blogging/wikis and scientific data.  I especially like the idea of mixing and matching datasets and creating new plots.

DataDepot is a set of tools for collaboratively uploading, sharing, and analyzing data. You can use DataDepot to track personal data, to explore public data, and to engage with scientific data.

Blog your data

Want to 'datablog' your running miles or your commute times or your grocery spending? DataDepot provides a simple way to track any type of data over time. You can add data via the web or your phone, then annotate, view, analyze, and add related content to your data.

Visualize your data

Data are visualized over time in an interactive Silverlight graph object. You can zoom in on your data to see statistics for a particular time span and to compare to the overall dataset.

Engage with data
Basic Statistical Overview
For each individual data track we provide a basic stastical overview, including an average, min and max, and standard deviation. For example, in the morning commute time datablog above, we see this person's commute averages 73 minutes, maxed out at 99 minutes, and has a standard deviation of 11 minutes.
Add related content
For each data page, you can add comments and wiki content.
Add an automated data source
Using our API, data can be added programmatically to create a 'sensor' that captures values for a data source as they change over time. Here we see a 'sensor' for the price of gas in the U.S. The political polling data shown above are also collected automatically every day using our API.
Combining data
You can "mix and match" datasets by creating a combined track. To do so, click Create a Track at the top of any page, then select 'A track that combines existing tracks...'. Using the dialogue boxes, select as many tracks as you would like to include in your combined tracks, then complete the short wizard to finalize your combined track.
Cross Posted from Dan Fay's Blog (http://blogs.msdn.com/dan_fay)