Expression Blend and Design

The team blog of the Expression Blend and Design products.

  • Expression Blend and Design

    Designing FreeCell using Expression and Visual Studio Toolsets

    • 1 Comments

    Unni Ravindranathan [1], Program Manager on Expression Interactive Designer, has an article published on Coding4Fun [2] called Designing FreeCell using Expression and Visual Studio Toolsets [3]. In the article Unni tells how he re-created the game FreeCell using the January CTP of Expression Interactive Designer and Visual Studio 2005 Express and he describes his experiences on the brief one-day journey and how much fun it turned out to be.

    If you're a parent or an educator (or even a kid!) then, while you're looking at the Coding4Fun website, you might be interested in the Kids' Programming Language [4]

    [1] http://blogs.msdn.com/unnir/

    [2] http://msdn.microsoft.com/coding4fun/

    [3] http://msdn.microsoft.com/coding4fun/coolapplications/wvfreecell/default.aspx

    [4] http://msdn.microsoft.com/coding4fun/coolapplications/kpl/default.aspx

  • Expression Blend and Design

    Saturday Afternoon Fever with Expression Graphic Designer

    • 1 Comments
    On his blog, Claudio Castelli [1] has published some artwork which he created with Expression Graphic Designer [2]. The piece we'd like to spotlight is called La febbre del Sabato Pomeriggio (Saturday Afternoon Fever) [3]. It is, in Claudio's own words, an expressionist-grotesque digital painting about an Italian provincial main street on Saturday afternoon where everyone goes for the simple pleasure of walking and seeing others. Claudio also tells us: "the great thing about using Expression is that I can 'print the paint', maintaining a large canvas size in a lossless quality (original size being 135cm x 175 cm)".

    Check out Claudio's
    animation videos [4], too. Well worth a look.

    [1]
    http://www.kurageart.com
    [2] http://blogs.msdn.com/expression/archive/2006/01/24/517135.aspx
    [3] hhttp://www.kurageart.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=28&Itemid=28
    [4] http://www.kurageart.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=category&sectionid=4&id=13&Itemid=28
  • Expression Blend and Design

    How to create Aqua Gel Buttons

    • 1 Comments
    Valentin Iliescu [1] deserves another mention for his tutorial on creating aqua gel buttons [2].



    [1]
    http://www.valil.com
    [2] http://spaces.msn.com/viliescu/blog/cns!A7CD34FAB0459777!252.entry
  • Expression Blend and Design

    License Your Expression Programs

    • 1 Comments

    After you buy and install any Expression program, you should immediately license your software to avoid future interruption of the programs. If you don’t license them, the programs will stop running after 60 days or possibly sooner if you have used a trial product key. When you start any unlicensed Expression program, a dialog box may prompt you to enter your product key to license the program. If you’ve closed that dialog without licensing your software or the dialog doesn’t appear, use the following steps to license your software instead:

     

    ·          To license Expression Blend, Expression Design, or Expression Media, start the program, choose Help > Enter Product Key, and then enter your product key which appears on a sticker on your software box; if you bought Expression Studio, licensing just one of these programs will also license the other two.

    ·          To license Expression Web, enter your product key when prompted during the installation process. If you installed Expression Web with a trial product key, you can license the installed trial program by doing the following: Close Expression Web and open your Control Panel in Windows. Double-click Programs and Features (Windows Vista) or Add or Remove Programs (Windows XP), select Microsoft Expression Web Trial in the list of installed programs, and click Change. In the installer dialog, select Convert and click Continue, and then follow the onscreen instructions to enter your product key.

  • Expression Blend and Design

    Overview of New Features in Expression Blend 3 + SketchFlow: Part 1

    • 1 Comments

    As you all have probably seen by now, we released the release candidate of Expression Blend 3 + SketchFlow to coincide with the release of Silverlight 3 today. The previous post was just a short one letting you know about the release and where to download everything from. In this post, let’s actually go over in a bit more detail on some of the new features.

    There are a lot of new features in Expression Blend 3, so this post will be split into two parts. If you want a more comprehensive overview of all new features now, please read our What’s New document.

    SketchFlow
    With SketchFlow, Expression Blend 3 introduces a new set of features designed to make it easier for you to experiment with dynamic user experiences and to create compelling prototypes. Christian Schormann has blogged extensively about this, so please read the following posts for more information: SketchFlow Concepts: An Overview, Sketching and Prototyping in Expression Blend. More…

    Design: Adobe PhotoShop and Adobe Illustrator Support
    You can use Expression Blend 3 to import both Adobe Photoshop (.psd) files and Adobe Illustrator (.ai) files directly into your projects, while retaining layers, shapes, text elements, and more for easy editing inside Expression Blend 3 itself. Janete Perez has more to share on her blog, sunnypixels: Introduction to Importing Photoshop Files, Photoshop Import- Supported Features, Photoshop Import – Merging Layers.

    Design: Revamped Assets panel
    The Asset Library has been redesigned and made into a dockable panel that can remain open while you work on the artboard:

    image

    Assets are categorized for easier searching and organization. Beyond just the UI there have been some really nice under-the-hood changes, and Unni Ravindranathan summaries them in his post: The Blend 3 Asset Library.

    Styling Controls: Creating templates from artwork
    You can use the modified Make Into Control command to select artwork on the artboard and to convert it into a skin (control template) for a control.

    Styling Controls: Creating TextBox Templates from Artwork
    If you use the Make Into Control command and choose either a TextBox control or anything derived from a ContentControl control, Expression Blend 3 will copy typographic properties from any TextBlock object that it finds (in the objects that you are converting) into the appropriate part in the resulting control template.

    States: Improved Support for VSM
    Support for the Silverlight Visual State Manager (VSM) in Expression Blend 3 has been improved with a revised user interface for the States panel:

    image

    The new design and general improvements made allow you to pin various states, draw into state, preview transitions, and more. The full What’s New document contains more details.

    Interactivity: Behaviors
    You can add interactivity to your application, without having to write code, by using behaviors. Behaviors are reusable components that can be directly applied to any object on the artboard, and they are composed of extensible triggers, extensible actions, and behaviors. There have been a lot of blogging on this from all of us, so you can read them all here: Blend 3 Behaviors: Interactivity Without Code, Behaviors : Making Interactivity Easy (and Fun!), Using Behaviors - A Quick Walkthrough, Blend 3: Triggers, Actions, and Behaviors, An Introduction to Behaviors, Triggers, and Actions, Blend 3 Behaviors: A Sample Action, Looking at Behaviors, the Class, Behaviors and Commands, Looking at Triggers and Actions, Behaviors: Writing your own Triggers, Behaviors Under the Hood – API Details and Constraining the Type, Pete’s Collection of Behaviors

    Working with and Generating Data
    Expression Blend 3 makes it easy to prototype, build, and test data-connected applications without having access to live data. Unni is back with an overview of this feature along with a link to other blog posts he liked: Introducing sample data support in Blend 3, Blend 3 Databinding.


    Phew. We are about half-way there with our overview of new features, so stay tuned for Part 2 shortly.

    Cheers!
    Kirupa

  • Expression Blend and Design

    The States Pane and WPF Controls

    • 1 Comments

    Last October I described how to use the States pane in a WPF project with Blend 2 Service Pack 1. Things are even simpler with Expression Blend 3 so in this post I’ll remind you how to use the States pane with WPF controls.

    As you may know, when you create a template for a Silverlight control, the States pane populates with States ready for you to select-and-design. This is because Silverlight controls are designed to work with States, and each Silverlight control advertises the States it works with. But WPF shipped before States did and consequently WPF controls know nothing about States. It’s actually the magic in the WPF Toolkit that makes WPF controls work with States. Blend 3 installs the WPF Toolkit for you automatically, so there is nothing extra you will need to do.

    This means that when you create a new template for a WPF control, the States pane is empty initially. But it only takes a few moments to add the correctly-named States and from there you’re on par with the Silverlight experience and you’re ready to select-and-design as usual.

    So, here’s a list of the WPF controls that work with States along with the state groups and states you’ll need to add.

    Button, GridViewColumnHeader, RepeatButton

    CommonStates:

            Normal, MouseOver, Pressed, Disabled

    FocusStates:

            Unfocused, Focused

    CheckBox, RadioButton

    CommonStates:

            Normal, MouseOver, Pressed, Disabled

    CheckStates:

            Unchecked, Checked, Indeterminate

    FocusStates:

            Unfocused, Focused

    ListBoxItem

    CommonStates:

            Normal, MouseOver

    SelectionStates:

            Unselected, Selected

    FocusStates:

           Unfocused, Focused

    ProgressBar

    CommonStates:

            Determinate, Indeterminate

    FocusStates:

            Unfocused, Focused

    TextBox, RichTextBox

    CommonStates:

           Normal, MouseOver, Disabled, ReadOnly

    FocusStates:

            Unfocused, Focused

    Hopefully this helps you to be more productive in WPF when working with states!

    -Steve

  • Expression Blend and Design

    Blend 3 Samples Deconstructed

    • 1 Comments

    In my previous post, I mentioned that most of the samples from previous versions of Expression Blend have been uploaded to our gallery. One thing that is common with all of the samples is that Celso Gomes had a hand in making them.

    Recently, Celso started deconstructing how many of the samples work at his site: http://www.nibblestutorials.net:

    nibblesTutorial_v2

    Go check out Celso’s site if you are interested in learning more about how these samples work.

    Cheers!
    Kirupa :)

  • Expression Blend and Design

    Hatching Effect Shader for both Siverlight and WPF

    • 1 Comments

    Hi everyone,
    As you all may know, both Silverlight 3 and WPF 3.5 SP1 introduced support for effects and shaders. One of the features that I work on in Expression Blend is to make sure that you can use these custom effects easily.

    Beyond just writing the functionality for making the effects work inside Blend, I enjoy writing custom effects as well, so in this post let me show you an example of a hatching shader effect I created.

    Here is a small example containing some shapes and an image:

    image

    The same example, with my hatching shader effect applied, looks as follows:

    image

    This effect is quite versatile in when and where you can apply it. For example, let’s say I have SketchFlow application that looks like the following screenshot:

    image

    By just applying this shader effect, you can go from what you see above to something that looks even more prototype-ish:

    image

    You can read more about this shader effect on my blog post that goes into greater detail on this here: http://digitalepiphania.com/blog/2009/07/01/hatching-effect-for-silverlight-3-and-wpf-35-sp1/

    For playing with this on your own, you can get the installer for this from the following location: http://digitalepiphania.com/Downloads/HatchingEffectSetup.msi

    - Charles

  • Expression Blend and Design

    Storyboards, Visual States and SketchFlow Animations

    • 1 Comments

    What are these things – are they different ways of doing the same task? When would I use one in preference to another? Do they all work in all project types?

    This post will try to answer those questions by describing the animation and control customization tools that are available to you in Expression Blend 3 + SketchFlow, and discussing what jobs each tool is meant to do. I’ll be classifying project types along two independent axes: WPF or Silverlight, and Blend or SketchFlow.

    In the first release of Blend, if you wanted to change the value of a property over time, then the Storyboard was your one option. Using a Storyboard is also known as ‘keyframing’. You create a new Storyboard (or create a BeginStoryboardAction and let that workflow create a Storyboard for you), move the playhead to various times and then use the artboard or the property inspector to change values. Each time you change a value, a keyframe is added to Blend’s Timeline meaning that, at that time, the property has that value. During the interval between keyframes, the property value smoothly takes on intermediate values in a process known as interpolation. By default, the interpolation between two values is linear, meaning the value changes steadily as time passes to form a straight gradient on a graph. And you can control interpolation between keyframes by describing an easing curve. Whether you were changing the Y coordinate of a bouncing ball, or changing the color of a rectangle in a Button template in response to a mouse click, in the first release of Blend you would have used a Storyboard to do it. Something you would have known about, too, is a handoff animation. This is an animation that has no keyframe at time 0 so that, when the Storyboard begins, property values are snapshotted and gradually changed to the value of the earliest keyframe. Handoff animations are important when defining the transition into a control state because you need the animation to be continuous even when it is interrupting an already in-flight transition (say you move the mouse over and then away from a control before the transition into the mouseover state completes).

    Storyboards are available in all project types. They’re just as useful today as ever, and they are worth learning how to use, because at some point you’ll probably need to use them. They give you the most control over animation, but control can come at the cost of some effort.

    For the task of customizing the look and transitions of a control’s visual states, there’s an alternative and arguably simpler mental model than using a Storyboard to define the transition into a state. The simpler mental model is that you draw the control in each of its states then, if it’s important to you, specify how long any of the transitions take. I say ‘draw’ because that’s morally what you’re doing; strictly speaking you select a state in Blend’s States panel, set properties, select another state, and so on, but you’re drafting a static image of how the control looks in each state. You needn’t be concerned with animation, although it’s interesting to note that the runtime that supports this mental model (that runtime is known as the Visual State Manager, or VSM for short) does generate a handoff animation for each state transition. For practical purposes, drawing states and setting transition durations like this gets the job done much of the time without needing to see Blend’s Timeline at all. But, if you need a steady state animation (say you want the blue focus rectangle to pulse all the time a control is focused), then yes you’ll need to open the Timeline and drop a couple of keyframes and set the animation to repeat indefinitely. Or if you want a shiny reflection to flash across a glass button during the transition from Normal to MouseOver, then again you’ll need to know what a Storyboard is.

    Of course you can leverage the Visual State Manager in your own UserControls too. This is because states can apply at the level of the individual control (e.g. in the MouseOver state a Brush is a different color) as well as at the level of a page or scene (e.g. in the ShoppingCartOpen state an otherwise hidden panel is visible). So, you can add states to one of your UserControls that represents a page or scene, set different properties in different states, then use GoToStateActions to drive state changes in response to events.

    The Visual State Manager is fully integrated into Blend Silverlight projects and SketchFlow Silverlight projects. You can also use VSM in WPF projects although, while the UserControl experience is the same as for Siverlight, not all WPF custom controls support VSM. I’ve written previously about the States panel and WPF controls.

    The last tool I’ll mention is the SketchFlow Animation, and this tool is available in SketchFlow projects only, both WPF and Silverlight. A SketchFlow Animation is logically a ‘storyboard’ in the true sense of the word: a sequence of frames that tells a story. When you’re building a prototype, you don��t want to implement a feature fully in order to demonstrate it. Playing back a scripted example of the interaction you have in mind gets the job done at the prototyping stage. So if you want to show off how you imagine your application will reorganize and animate in response to the user dragging a product into the shopping cart, you could create a new SketchFlow animation and then draw a few frames showing how the product gets dragged between containers and how the layout of those containers responds, and even specify the easing between frames.

    For those who like to know how things work under the hood, a SketchFlow Animation is represented internally as a VSM state group. But you don’t need to be familiar with VSM to use a SketchFlow Animation. Nor do you need to be aware of what a Storyboard is, nor be able to use Blend’s Timeline. In a sense, each frame (or state) in a SketchFlow Animation is a keyframe, but at a macro level so that each keyframe defines the entire scene at a point in time rather than the micro keyframes in a Storyboard that define a single property’s value at a point in time.

    Now that you have an idea of what these different pieces do, and when they’re available, you’ll be able to pick the most efficient tool for each animation job you want to do.

    Steve

  • Expression Blend and Design

    Expression Blend Sessions at MIX10

    • 1 Comments

    If you haven’t had a chance to check out the sessions from MIX10 that showcased Expression Blend 4, the links below should help you out:

    Authoring for Windows Phone, Silverlight 4 and WPF 4 with Expression Blend
    by Christian Schormann and Pete Blois

    Get Microsoft Silverlight

     

    Dynamic Layout and Transitions for Microsoft Silverlight 4 with Microsoft Expression Blend
    by Kenny Young

    Get Microsoft Silverlight

     

    Prototyping Rich Microsoft Silverlight Applications with Expression SketchFlow
    by Chris Bernard

    Get Microsoft Silverlight

     

    This post only focuses on the sessions from MIX that are Expression Blend specific. By now, all of the sessions from MIX should be available online, so head over to the MIX Sessions page to view more: http://live.visitmix.com/Sessions

    Cheers,
    Kirupa =)

  • Expression Blend and Design

    Control Storyboards Easily using Behaviors

    • 1 Comments

    It’s been a while since the last article where I promised to write about all of the behaviors that ship with Expression Blend in greater detail. I’ll try to be more prompt in the future. Today, let’s look at the ControlStoryboardAction and the StoryboardCompletedTrigger.

    Storyboards are one of the primary ways you create animations in Silverlight, WPF, and Windows Phone using Expression Blend. Creating a storyboard is fairly easy, but actually using a storyboard such as having it play is not. To help with this, you have the ControlStoryboardAction.

    What is it?

    Simply put, the ControlStoryboardAction is an Action that allows you to select a storyboard and specify what you would like to do to it:

    image

    Let’s look at some of the properties it contains in greater detail.

    Using It

    When it comes to this behavior, there are only two properties that you need to concern yourself with. They are the ControlStoryboardOption and Storyboard properties.

    The ControlStoryboardOption property lists the tasks you would like to perform:

    image

    From here you can choose whether you want to play a storyboard, stop it, toggle between play/pause, pause, resume, or jump to the end.

    The only missing piece so far is knowing which storyboard to affect. Not to worry, because you specify the storyboard using the aptly named Storyboard property:

    image

    This property will list all of the Storyboards your behavior has access to. Once you have selected a Storyboard, you are done!

    StoryboardCompletedTrigger

    Another little behavior component we have is the StoryboardCompletedTrigger:

    sct

    This trigger invokes an Action when a specified storyboard (set via the Storyboard property) has fully run to completion. Of course, because it is a trigger, you can use it with any Action.

    Cheers,
    Kirupa =)

  • Expression Blend and Design

    Check Out The New Pattern (XAML+CS) Library!

    • 1 Comments

    Creating great looking and functioning applications is tough. It requires having a good eye for design, but it also requires some technical knowledge about how to make the design functional.

    As you can probably guess, it is our goal to help you use Expression Blend, Visual Studio, and our related tools to create those great applications. We spend a great deal of time adding new features and making existing features better to help you do just that. Making improvements to the applications is only one side of how we try to help you create great applications, however.

    The other side involves helping you better understand how to actually create great applications, and we try our best to provide some valuable training resources. Some notable shoutouts include the .toolbox and the Expression Community sites. While looking at videos or reading tutorials is useful, we wanted to go further and also provide you with a library of xaml+code samples that showcase something small, something specific, something cool. We felt that, in many cases, simply being able to deconstruct how something was done can be equally (if not more useful) in learning how to do something.

    This library of xaml+code snippets, known better by its friends and family as the Pattern Library, lives as an extension to the Expression Gallery:

    visualPatternLibrary

    You can learn more about the Pattern Library by reading Lars Power’s newsletter article introducing it.

    Please feel free to download and play with the patterns. If there is something you feel is missing, please feel to let us know or just create it yourself and upload it.

    Cheers,
    Kirupa =)

  • Expression Blend and Design

    Microsoft Expression News

    • 1 Comments

    We released important news today about the Expression family of products.  Please visit the Expression Community site for details.

  • Expression Blend and Design

    Windows Phone 7 Themed Videos

    • 1 Comments

    As you can imagine, shortly after a major release like we had, most of us shift our focus slightly towards talking about and sharing how to use some of the cool new features we released. In this first of a two-part series, I hope to make up for the long period of inactivity on this blog by sharing two Windows Phone focused videos that Unni, Billy, and I recorded for Channel 9.

    Overview of Expression Blend for Windows Phone 7
    The first video on this list is one that walks you through, at a breakneck speed, most of the new features we added to Expression Blend to help make building Windows Phone 7 apps easier:

    Get Microsoft Silverlight

    Through the guise of building a Bing Search application, I cover features ranging from our Device Panel to Application Bar support to creating Sample Data from a Class file. You can learn more about these features by looking at some of my more in-depth Windows Phone 7-focused articles.

    Windows Phone Design Templates
    Billy and Unni are up next to showcase some of the templates they created to make creating common Windows Phone 7 UI layouts really easy:

    Get Microsoft Silverlight

    The templates they created cover a wide range of common UIs that you will see, so feel free to use these directly in your own projects or simply as a source of inspiration. Before you can do any of that, of course, download the templates from codeplex first.

    As always, if you have any questions, feel free to comment below. If you recorded some interesting videos, post them in the comments as well.

    Cheers,
    Kirupa =)

  • Expression Blend and Design

    Limited Time: 30% Discount on Expression Studio 3

    • 0 Comments

    Hi everyone,
    For a limited time, there is a 30% discount on all Microsoft Expression 3 products (Microsoft Expression Studio + Expression Web, both full and upgrade versions) through the Microsoft Online Store for US-based customers:

    save30

    No promo code required at all – just go to the store and add to the shopping cart!

    Cheers,
    Kirupa

  • Expression Blend and Design

    Deep Zoom Composer – Adding Links, Creating Menus, and Creating Slideshows

    • 0 Comments

    Hi everyone,
    As many of you may have noticed, our new release of Deep Zoom Composer contains a lot of new features. Unfortunately, due to time constraints, we did not have time to adequately update our documentation to explain how all of these new features work.

    To help with this, fellow Blender and officemate, Janete Perez has written a few blog posts with some really nice Deep Zoom examples (static screenshots only posted below) highlighting some of our new features:

    Adding Links

    texas

    Creating Menus

    architecture_example

    Slideshow Support

    flowers_slideshow

    So be sure to click on the above links to see them. We hope to have a version of Deep Zoom Composer with the updated documentation available soon, though it will not be in our next release.

    Cheers!
    Kirupa =)

  • Expression Blend and Design

    Expression Blend 3 – Secrets of Working With Data

    • 0 Comments

    Evgeny is back with a great blog post describing some cool features related to the new Sample Data feature we introduced in Expression Blend 3.

    Visit his blog post to go read it: http://etvorun.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!6054141F335D00D3!130.entry

    Cheers!
    Kirupa :)

  • Expression Blend and Design

    Team posts on Styles and Templates

    • 0 Comments
    Check out a couple of personal blog postings from some members of the Expression team.

    Adrian Vinca [1] explains how to create a simple Style which has a Trigger [2].

    Mario Guzzi [3] explains how using Expression Interactive Designer makes things like creating a ListBox which scrolls horizontally [4] really easy.

    [1]
    http://blogs.msdn.com/adrianvinca/
    [2] http://blogs.msdn.com/adrianvinca/archive/2006/02/16/532949.aspx
    [3] http://blogs.msdn.com/mariogu/
    [4] http://blogs.msdn.com/mariogu/archive/2006/02/13/531353.aspx
  • Expression Blend and Design

    Valentin Iliescu's Portal UI XBAP

    • 0 Comments
    Valentin Iliescu has developed a XAML Browser Application with a portal interface [1] (similar to Windows Live Beta [2]). Try out moving the panels around or expanding/collapsing them. The application is compatible with the January CTP of the Windows Presentation Foundation [3].

    [1]
    http://www.valil.com/portaluitest/portaluitest.xbap
    [2] http://www.live.com/
    [3] http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?familyid=61DD9CA7-1668-42E4-BD37-03716DD83E53&displaylang=en
  • Expression Blend and Design

    XAML namespace changes for the upcoming February CTP of WPF

    • 0 Comments
    Rob Relyea's [1] blog is worth knowing about if you're interested in Windows Presentation Foundation (and if you're into Expression Interactive Designer then you're interested in WPF!). Rob has blogged about the upcoming XAML namespace changes in the next CTP of WPF [2].

    The February CTP of WPF hasn't yet been released but watch this space.

    [1]
    http://www.longhornblogs.com/rrelyea/default.aspx
    [2] http://www.longhornblogs.com/rrelyea/archive/2006/02/14/XamlMigrator.aspx
  • Expression Blend and Design

    A small 3D tutorial

    • 0 Comments
    Lingesh Palaniappan [1], a Software Design Engineer in Test in the Expression Interactive Designer team, has published a small 3D tutorial [2] on his blog. In the tutorial, Lingesh walks through creating a sample 3D project in Expression Interactive Designer.



    [1]
    http://spaces.msn.com/lingesh
    [2] http://spaces.msn.com/lingesh/blog/cns!B5F8102FAF69E1CC!106.entry

  • Expression Blend and Design

    Expression Interactive Designer: Three Discoveries

    • 0 Comments
    Our evangelist Karsten Januszewski has blogged about his discovery of three time-saving features of Expression Interactive Designer [1].

    [1]
    http://blogs.msdn.com/karstenj/archive/2006/02/10/529742.aspx
  • Expression Blend and Design

    Top Ten UI Development Breakthroughs In Windows Presentation Foundation

    • 0 Comments
    Ian Griffiths and Chris Sells (the authors of Programming Windows Presentation Foundation [1]) have published an excellent MSDN Magazine article called Top Ten UI Development Breakthroughs In Windows Presentation Foundation [2]. Well worth a read.

    [1]
    http://www.sellsbrothers.com/writing/avbook/
    [2] http://msdn.microsoft.com/windowsvista/building/presentation/default.aspx?pull=/msdnmag/issues/06/01/windowspresentationfoundation/default.aspx
  • Expression Blend and Design

    How do I choose between ASP.NET, Atlas, Windows Forms and WPF?

    • 0 Comments

    In his blog post [1], Tim Sneath answers the following questions about considering when and where to use the most appropriate presentation layer technology:

    • How do Windows Presentation Foundation, XAML and ASP.NET fit together? I've heard you can build web applications using XAML - does that mean that ASP.NET is dead?
    • I've seen comments about "Atlas forever changing the way web apps are implemented", how does Atlas fit into the whole WinFX picture?
    • So WPF is the new rich client technology for building web and standalone applications in WinFX. Where does that leave DirectX and Windows Forms?
    • Windows Forms, ASP.NET/Atlas, DirectX, WPF, Win32 - that's five UI technologies to choose between. How do I decide?

    [1] http://blogs.msdn.com/tims/archive/2006/02/23/538189.aspx

  • Expression Blend and Design

    Where can I go to learn about WPF?

    • 0 Comments
    Tim Sneath, a technical evangelist for Windows Vista, is often asked, "Where can I go to learn about WPF?"

    He enumerates some great resources to answer that question in his
    blog post [1].

    [1]
    http://blogs.msdn.com/tims/archive/2006/02/16/533301.aspx
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