Krzysztof had a question on StackOverflow around doing MVP triads wtith MEF. He came up with a way to do it that he wasn't happy with and which I told him was pretty hacky :) After chatting with Krzysztof I took a shot and came up with something which looks pretty clean.

   1: using System.ComponentModel.Composition;
   2: using System.Reflection;
   3: using Microsoft.VisualStudio.TestTools.UnitTesting;
   4:  
   5: namespace MVPwithMEF
   6: {
   7:     /// <summary>
   8:     /// Summary description for MVPTriadFixture
   9:     /// </summary>
  10:     [TestClass]
  11:     public class MVPTriadFixture
  12:     {
  13:         [TestMethod]
  14:         public void MVPTriadShouldBeProperlyBuilt()
  15:         {
  16:             var catalog = new AttributedAssemblyPartCatalog(Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly());
  17:             var container = new CompositionContainer(catalog.CreateResolver());
  18:             var shell = container.GetExportedObject<Shell>();
  19:             Assert.IsNotNull(shell);
  20:             Assert.IsNotNull(shell.Presenter);
  21:             Assert.IsNotNull(shell.Presenter.View);
  22:             Assert.IsNotNull(shell.Presenter.Model);
  23:         }
  24:     }
  25:  
  26:     [Export]
  27:     public class Shell
  28:     {
  29:         private IPresenter _presenter = null;
  30:         
  31:         public IPresenter Presenter
  32:         {
  33:             get { return _presenter; }
  34:         }
  35:  
  36:         [ImportingConstructor]
  37:         public Shell(IPresenter presenter)
  38:         {
  39:             _presenter = presenter;
  40:         }
  41:     }
  42:  
  43:     public interface IModel
  44:     {
  45:     }
  46:  
  47:     [Export(typeof(IModel))]
  48:     public class Model : IModel
  49:     {
  50:         
  51:     }
  52:  
  53:     public interface IView
  54:     {
  55:     }
  56:  
  57:     [Export(typeof(IView))]
  58:     public class View : IView
  59:     {
  60:     }
  61:  
  62:     public interface IPresenter
  63:     {
  64:         IView View { get;}
  65:         IModel Model { get; }
  66:     }
  67:  
  68:     [Export(typeof(IPresenter))]
  69:     public class Presenter : IPresenter
  70:     {
  71:  
  72:         private IView _view;
  73:         private IModel _model;
  74:  
  75:         [ImportingConstructor]
  76:         public Presenter(IView view, IModel model)
  77:         {
  78:             _view = view;
  79:             _model = model;
  80:         }
  81:  
  82:         public IView View
  83:         {
  84:             get { return _view; }
  85:         }
  86:  
  87:         public IModel Model
  88:         {
  89:             get { return _model; }
  90:         }
  91:  
  92:     }
  93: }

So what's going on here?

Shell gets injected with Presenter. Presenter gets injected with View and Model. Everything here is singletons, but doesn't have to be.

The difference between our two examples is that the Presenter is getting injected into the shell rather than the View. If the Presenter is creating the View then you can't just grab the View first (as he was doing), or the Presenter will not get created. Well you can do it, but you end up hacking it to bits. Cleaner is to just inject the Presenter and have it expose an IView. We did this in Prism and it worked quite well.

Any questions?

Yes, yes this looks DI containerish. You can use MEF for simple DI stuff (as Krz is doing), but as you get to more complex systems, the experience won't be optimal.