I was trying to get a couple vpc's to network together using the Local only network setting the other day with no success. I futzed around for a while with various network settings, etc. and finally decided to ping around for some expert advice. This leads me to another thing I love about my job - not only am I surrounded by tons of smart people at Microsoft, but I also have the privilege of working with some really smart folks on the partner side of the world. I remembered from our fun experiences last year with the CTPs leading up to Beta 2 and needing separate installations for the client and server parts of VSTS. This made for a challenging vpc installation and setup, but fortunately for us we were working with Etienne Tremblay from EDS in our early adopter program. He had all that already figured out and was one of our best contributors of TFS feedback in the program. Etienne has been really great to work with because he's not only a super-smart guy, but he provides excellent feedback and also happily shares tech tips. I owe Etienne some dinner when we're both in Redmond again as he got me up and running with my two vpc's chatting within 10 minutes. I've got a Linux vpc with x-platform Teamprise client on it to successfully access a TFS installation on our Beta 3 Refresh vpc. Pretty cool stuff. Here's what Etienne walked me through:

  • Install the microsoft network loopback adapter on the machine hosting the 2 vpc's
  • Go into network configuration for the loopback adapter and set a static ip address such as 192.168.2.1 with subnet mask 255.255.255.0
  • On the network adapter settings for both vpc's set those to the new loopback adapter selection
  • Start both vpc's
  • In the network configurations for both vpc's set a static ip address for one as 192.168.2.2 and the other to 192.168.2.3 (or similar)
  • In the Linux vpc I used the IP address for the TFS server name since it's friendly name was not mapped on that system

That's pretty much it (without the step by step instructions of course, but it gives you the basic idea). Thanks Etienne!