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  • Blog Post: Detection keys for Visual Studio 2012

    Administrators and developers who need to detect if Visual Studio 2012 is installed on a machine can use similar keys as those used for past releases like Visual Studio 2010 . In general, these detection keys are always found in the 32-bit registry hive with a pattern like: Core product: HKLM\Software...
  • Blog Post: Detection keys for .NET Framework 4.0 and Visual Studio 2010

    Now that Microsoft .NET Framework 4.0 and Visual Studio 2010 have been released, developers may wonder how to detect them on the system. As with previous releases, we support registry detection of either product family and Windows Installer component detection for Visual Studio. Detecting either product...
  • Blog Post: Detecting Visual Studio 2008 Service Pack 1

    The Visual Studio 2008 RTM and SP1 detection keys are largely the same as the Visual Studio 2005 SP1 detection keys , and are documented below. But there is a caveat for released and upcoming versions: the shared detection value can be overwritten by an older installation of the same release. For...
  • Blog Post: Microsoft .NET Framework 2.0 Service Pack 1, and How to Detect It

    No doubt you've heard the Microsoft .NET Framework 3.5 was released . Aaron Stebner has posted a list of links to 3.5, as well as 2.0 Service Pack 1 (SP1) and 3.0 SP1. It's important to note that if you install 3.5 you're actually getting 2.0 SP1 and 3.0 SP1 both. The .NET Framework 3.5 consists of the...
  • Blog Post: Detecting Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1

    Now that Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 is released, it can be detected programmatically in various ways. Registry detection is recommended for ease and is less impacted by future changes to the product installation. Because there are many different Visual Studio 2005 editions and service pack 1 patch...
  • Blog Post: Detecting Patches in .NET 2.0 and Visual Studio 2005

    Aaron Stebner posted some sample code to detect whether the .NET Framework 1.0, 1.1, or 2.0 were installed and at what service pack level they are. Basically, the .NET Framework installation writes a common, version-specific registry key in the following location along with an SP level registry...
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