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  • Blog Post: Why Windows Installer May Require so much Disk Space

    Windows Installer is an engine for performing transactional installations. When installing a product for the fist time, most often few or no files to be installed are already present on the machine. But when upgrading or patching a product, most often those files are replaced so copies must be kept if...
  • Blog Post: Visual Studio and .NET Log Collection Utility

    Setup and deployment is a tricky business. Machines can be in many different and often unforeseen states that cause setup to fail. But rarely will setup actually crash, and that is why setup logs are vital to diagnose install, repair, and uninstall problems. Setup applications for Visual Studio and...
  • Blog Post: Progress for New Patches

    You asked. We answered. One source of problems for Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 was that VS 2005 SP1 targeted multiple products, and if you had multiple target products installed - most commonly Visual Studio 2005 and SQL Server 2005 that uses our IDE - multiple instances of dialogs would spawn...
  • Blog Post: Unchanged Files Break Patch Uninstall

    I've discussed a couple different reasons that Windows Installer 3.0-style patches - those with the MsiPatchMetadata table in the patch package itself - might not be uninstallable. I explained another reason in a discussion about the new patch build support in Windows Installer XML (WiX) v3 recently...
  • Blog Post: How to Safely Delete Orphaned Patches

    If Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 fails to install, you might find additional .msp files under %WINDIR%\Installer for each failed attempt. You should not simply delete these patches , however, because if one of the patches was applied successfully to one target product, deleting that patch will cause...
  • Blog Post: The Patch Cache and Freeing Space

    When you install a patch using Windows Installer, the .msp file is cached in the %WINDIR%\Installer directory. This accounts for some of the space required by Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 . A single patch is cached only once regardless to how many products the patch applies . Starting with Windows...
  • Blog Post: Detecting Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1

    Now that Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 is released, it can be detected programmatically in various ways. Registry detection is recommended for ease and is less impacted by future changes to the product installation. Because there are many different Visual Studio 2005 editions and service pack 1 patch...
  • Blog Post: Slipstreaming Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1

    Now that Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 is released, some are wondering how to slipstream the patch so they can install Visual Studio 2005 with SP1 already applied. Much of this process is standard practice for Windows Installer packages. Please note this will require a lot of disk space, as you...
  • Blog Post: Save Time and Space for VS 2005 SP1 by Disabling the Patch Cache

    The upcoming Visual Studio 2005 Service Pack 1 can take a while to install and can require a lot of disk installed, and even more disk space while installing the patch. You can save a little of both by disabling the Windows Installer patch caching feature. Before doing so, understand that this patch...
  • Blog Post: Custom Actions under UAC in Vista

    Visual Studio 2005 works for the most part on Windows Vista, but there are some known issues being addressed beyond SP1. One compatibility issue when running on Vista with UAC enabled may actually occur when installing the recently released SP1 beta on certain editions of Visual Studio 2005. User Account...
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