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  • Blog Post: How to get the active Team Foundation Server and Project from an Add-In

    Ed Hintz posted "How to Write a Team Foundation Version Control Add-in for Visual Studio" which is a great guide to writing an add-in to integrate with Team Foundation version control. I won't repeat that info her. If you want to do something that is related to the active Team Server and/or Project from...
  • Blog Post: Flashing Dialogboxes

    This example demonstrates how to flash a dialog in the taskbar after performing a long running operation from the command line. A good example of how this is useful is in the VS Team Foundation version control toolset. Naturally, it includes a command line utility (TF.EXE) to perform source control operations...
  • Blog Post: Overcoming a .NET ListView CheckBoxes quirk

    In the Visual Studio Team Foundation version control UI, we display your pending changes in a ListView control. That ListView has CheckeBoxes set to true as we allow you to perform a variety of operations on the checked items. At the same time we want you to be able to double click on an item in the...
  • Blog Post: Give the .NET loader a hand - how to load assemblies from VS PrivateAssemblies

    This program demonstrates how to use the AppDomain.AssemblyResolve event to help the .NET loader get assemblies loaded that it can't find. The VS Team Foundation edition ships with a number of assemblies you may want to reference in your own apps. Most of the important ones are installed in the GAC...
  • Blog Post: WinForms ListView Performance - ListView collections

    The WinForms ListView has a few very handy collections - CheckedItems and CheckedIndices. SelectedItems is a collection of the ListViewItems that are selected. SelectedIndices is a collection of the indexes of the ListViewItems that are selected. Those values can be used to pick out ListViewItems from...
  • Blog Post: WinForms ListView Performance - Initializing checked states

    CheckBoxes in a WinForms ListView are of course a bit simpler to use than dealing the underlying Win32 control directly. WinForms deals with the ListView structures and the WM_NOTIFY messages. Of course this comes at a cost. Here's a simple demonstration of how to tweak things for better performance...
  • Blog Post: WinForms ListView Performance

    While working on improving the performance of the version control UI for Visual Studio Team Foundation Server, I encountered a number of potential problems with the WinForms ListView control. As it turns out, adding items to a ListView can be VERY expensive if the list is sorted (as they should be...
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