IEInternals

A look at Internet Explorer from the inside out. @EricLaw left Microsoft in 2012, but was named an IE MVP in '13 & an IE userAgent (http://useragents.ie) in '14

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  • Blog Post: “Continue” Link Missing from Certificate Error Page?

    A user recently reported that IE11 wasn’t showing the “Continue” link on the certificate error page shown when visiting their 2009-era router’s configuration UI. They were curious why that link wasn’t shown in this instance. The error page’s Continue link is hidden...
  • Blog Post: Proxy-Authentication breaks many applications

    When I first joined Office, I worked on the team responsible for delivering Help, Templates, and ClipArt into the client applications. As we were testing our work in various simulated customer environments, we found a big problem. At least one big customer (tens of thousands of licenses) had a network...
  • Blog Post: Authenticode and Weak Certificate Chains

    Recently, someone attempted to download a deprecated version of the Windows Script debugger . This tool was used to debug scripts prior to the introduction of more powerful, modern tools like those that are built into IE8 and later. The user emailed me when they encountered a very surprising outcome...
  • Blog Post: Understanding Certificate Revocation Checks

    Recently, there’s been some interest in how clients perform Certificate Revocation checks and browsers behave in the event that a revocation check cannot be completed. In today’s post, I’ll explain Internet Explorer’s default behavior and explain how you may change the default...
  • Blog Post: Everything you need to know about Authenticode Code Signing

    In today’s post, I’ll be discussing the use of Authenticode to sign software programs; this post will be of interest primarily to software developers. Large software companies (like Microsoft) often have an entire team dedicated to the code-signing and release process, but even (especially...
  • Blog Post: Certificate Enrollment from the Browser

    Back in Windows XP, an ActiveX control known as XEnroll could be used from the browser to request digital certificates on the client’s behalf. Certificate authorities and others would use this control when a customer purchased a certificate for code signing, server authentication, or other purposes...
  • Blog Post: Understanding Certificate Name Mismatches

    Recently, I received a query from the Windows Mobile team-- they had observed that visiting https://gmail.com triggers a certificate name mismatch error on IEMobile, but doesn’t seem to trigger any error on Windows 7 when using the desktop versions of Internet Explorer or Firefox. Now, long-time readers...
  • Blog Post: Client Certificate Selection Prompt

    The HTTPS protocol allows a secure server to request that the client verify their identity with a client certificate during the initial secure handshake. By presenting a client certificate, the browser helps further defeat man-in-the-middle attacks and authenticates to the web server more securely than...
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