Microsoft Office 2010 Engineering
The official blog of the Microsoft Office product development group

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  • Blog Post: SharePoint List Data Connections in InfoPath 2010

    Hi, my name is Joey Wiggs and I’m a developer on the InfoPath team. In InfoPath 2010, one of the ways in which we've improved our integration with SharePoint Server 2010 is by providing richer capabilities for connecting to and getting data from SharePoint lists. In this post, I will compare SharePoint...
  • Blog Post: Cool Forms! Weather Forecast Form

    This week’s cool form displays your local weather forecast by using a REST Web Service data connection to pull in weather information from an online weather service. There are two views to the form, one minimal and one extended. The form contains linked picture controls that use rules to concatenate...
  • Blog Post: Add a Dynamic Map to a Contact Form using REST Web Services

    Update: Due to a change in the Bing Maps REST Web Service, the steps outlined in this blog post no longer work. We are looking into the possibility of using a different API, and will update this post soon with details. Hi, Phil Newman here from the InfoPath team. In this post, I’ll explain how to use...
  • Blog Post: InfoPath Data Connections: Part 1

    Summary This article is part of a series of documents explaining the Data concept in Microsoft Office InfoPath. This particular article is an overview of how Data Connections work in InfoPath. The intended audience is those who are new to InfoPath and those who use InfoPath, but have not built up...
  • Blog Post: Do You Love Access? We do too!

    And that's why there's all the new-and-cool documentation about how to make your InfoPath forms work well with Access: Design a form template that is based on a Microsoft Access database Add a data connection to a Microsoft Access database Submit form data to a Microsoft Access database ...
  • Blog Post: SQL Server 2005, Part III: Magic of Structured Search

    You were patient enough to read through my ramblings about why Yukon and InfoPath are a match made in heaven , and how to set up basic interop . But these two articles left you dreaming of more. Well, that was their purpose :-). Magic begins: Structure-aware query. Full text search is, ahem, much...
  • Blog Post: UDC File Authoring Tool

    Some time ago, we blogged about the reasons why you'd use UDC files and the anatomy of UDC files . You may be wondering, however, if it's possible to author these files in InfoPath - after all, UDC files are just XML files. You're right - this is definitely possible. Attached to this article is a...
  • Blog Post: InfoPath and Yukon: The Details

    In a recent post , I touched upon the reasons why you might want to go with SQL Server XML columns as the storage for your InfoPath forms. In this article, we'll talk about actually making it work. InfoPath's strength is working with XML data sources: web services. In the implementation below, we...
  • Blog Post: InfoPath and SQL Server 2005: Intro

    SQL Server 2005, also known as Yukon, comes with greatly improved XML support . Just look at it: native XML columns - store XML blobs in your records, along with other data types. These XML columns can be typed or untyped; typed here refers to XSD typing, which provides backend data validation. If an...
  • Blog Post: Submitting to a Database (via Web Services) in InfoPath Forms Services

    If you've ever designed and deployed a form that will be frequently used or require significant data analysis, you have probably looked into maintaining data in a SQL database . With InfoPath 2003 and the InfoPath 2007 rich client, you get what you expect. You create a main database data connection to...
  • Blog Post: More articles from the community

    It's Friday, and on Fridays I usually try to dig up a cool article or two from the community 1) Patrick Tisseghem wrote a beautiful walkthrough on making browser forms show up in a web part - no code required, just follow the screenshots. 2) S.Y.M. Wong-A-Ton published a very detailed paper on...
  • Blog Post: Data Connections in Template Parts

    Template parts allow a form designer to combine view information, rules, schema, default data and other compatible components of a form template into a package that can be distributed to other form designers and inserted into form templates without manual recreation. Data connections, with some restrictions...
  • Blog Post: Using SQL Server 2005 Web Services with InfoPath

    Here’s your problem: You want to use a stored procedure in a database to access your data through InfoPath, but you don’t really want to have to write script for every query to change the stored procedure’s query parameters. We’ve all been there. Well, stop your coding, right now, because SQL Server...
  • Blog Post: Workflow user experience in InfoPath

    Microsoft Office SharePoint workflow can be described as a series of tasks implemented with specific business needs to help people manage their project tasks. In Microsoft Office InfoPath 2007, we provide the workflows user experience for InfoPath forms. Additionally, we enable InfoPath business logic...
  • Blog Post: Web services are a peach, and then? UDDI!

    I’ve been blogging quite a bit about the brave new world of data connection libraries and UDC files. A data connection library is the recommended way to expose data connections for use in enterprise InfoPath forms. Users can easily select an appropriate connection by name and description without needing...
  • Blog Post: Integrated Innovation: Access Data Collection

    One of the major bets we continue to work on delivering is the notion of integrated innovation. Across Office, we have applications that are great at certain tasks and one of our jobs is to try and bring those great technologies together to make a fantastic customer experience. A great demonstrations...
  • Blog Post: The anatomy of a UDC file

    OK, we’ve talked about super-fantastic high end authentication scenarios. We’ve talked about cross-domain security and administrative control. We’ve talked about generating UDC files using InfoPath and consuming them again in the designer. Now let’s drill into the structure of the file itself. UDC...
  • Blog Post: Where do UDC files come from?

    Where do UDC files come from? - I knew you’d ask. (For those of you who are wondering what a UDC file is, you should go read my post entitled " Making data connections work in browser forms .") There are a couple of ways to go about it. UDC files are just xml files with a specific namespace and...
  • Blog Post: Data Connections in Browser Forms

    A while back, I wrote a series of 3 blog posts about authentication that was targeted at advanced enterprise-level scenarios involving multi-tier delegation of credentials for data connections on the server. However, I never took the time to cover the basic scenarios around getting basic data connections...
  • Blog Post: One-to-Many Relationships on Database Connections

    There have been a few questions about how the main database submit data connection works with related tables.  This is an FYI to clear up some of those issues, as I don't think this information ever made it public!   At least one of the relationships for every pair of related tables must include...
  • Blog Post: Advanced server-side authentication for data connections, part 3

    This is the final segment of my three part series. In the first part of this series I introduced the concepts involved in three tier authentication. Then I covered single sign-on with some code. Now we'll go one step further… Authorization using the Web service proxy InfoPath Forms Services...
  • Blog Post: Advanced server-side authentication for data connections, part 2

    In the first part of this series I introduced the concepts involved in three tier authentication. Now let's drill into the details and work with some code. Using Office Single Sign-on with individual mapping An Office Single Sign-on (SSO) application definition, can be set up in one of three...
  • Blog Post: Advanced server-side authentication for data connections, part 1

    To tier three... and beyond! Real-world enterprise applications are seldom restricted to a single server. Anyone who has created a nontrivial multi-tier application in a Windows environment has had to work around a fundamental limitation in NTLM authentication: namely, that NTLM authentication tokens...
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