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Browse by Tags - Jim O'Neil - Technology Evangelist - Site Home - MSDN Blogs

Browse by Tags

Browse by Tags
  • Blog Post: .NET from A to Z – The Index

    As you might be aware, this week ended my A-Z series exploring various facets of Microsoft and .NET technologies.  It was actually a lot of fun to explore a different topic each week, and I’m even happier to say I didn’t miss one Monday, making me something like 1 for10 in terms of fulfilling New...
  • Blog Post: Z is for… Zermatt

    Zermatt is, well actually was , the code name for Microsoft’s next generation identity and access management API.   Zermatt is now known by its new code name of “Geneva” Framework, but short of z-index , I was coming up empty on something to cover for this final post of my A-Z series – so let...
  • Blog Post: Y is for… Yield

    Before we talk specifically about the yield keyword, let’s review a few constructs you probably use everyday, namely collection classes like lists and arrays.  We’re quite used to traversing these simply with a foreach loop, and what enables us to do so is that these types implement the System.Collections...
  • Blog Post: X is for… XML Literal

    XML Literal(s) is a feature that Visual Basic developers can call their own! The XML Literal syntax facilitates creating XML documents and elements that support the vast majority of the XML 1.0 specification . Complementing the literals are axis properties that aid in navigating and accessing XML elements...
  • Blog Post: W is for… WeakReference

    With most of the major development technologies from Microsoft beginning with a “W” – Windows Presentation Foundation , Windows Communication Foundation , Windows Workflow Foundation – there was no shortage of choices for today’s post.  But somehow those just seemed too easy, and well, a bit large...
  • Blog Post: V is for… Velocity

    Velocity is the code name (and a cool code name at that) for a highly-scalable, in-memory cache currently in a Community Technology Preview (CTP) stage.  The objective of Velocity is to increase performance by enabling your applications to grab data from the cache versus needing to make expensive...
  • Blog Post: U is for… unchecked

    Welcome to the Memorial Day edition of the A-Z series!  As I flipped through the index of Pro C# 2008 and the .NET 3.5 Platform , I happened upon the unchecked keyword - one of those things I remember seeing once or twice, but couldn’t really recall what it did or how it worked.  As  you...
  • Blog Post: T is for… Tracepoint

    I’ve presented various sessions on Debugging Tips and Tricks as part of the Northeast Roadshow and MSDN Events series, and one of the undiscovered gems in that presentation is that of tracepoints.  Tracepoints have actually been around since Visual Studio 2005, but weren’t all that discoverable...
  • Blog Post: S is for… sqlmetal

    sqlmetal is one of the rare cases where a Microsoft utility or application ends up seeing the light of day with a cool name!  If you’re working with LINQ to SQL you may know what sqlmetal is, but since much of what it does is part of the Visual Studio designer experience there’s a fair chance you...
  • Blog Post: R is for... REST

    REST stands for Representational State Transfer, an acronym coined by Dr. Roy Fielding in 2000 as part of his doctoral dissertation at the University of California, Irvine .  As Dr. Fielding states in Chapter 6, Since 1994, the REST architectural style has been used to guide the design and development...
  • Blog Post: Q is for... Quirks

    Quirks… we all have them, but rather than get too personal, we’ll constrain the domain for this post to web browsers.  In the early days of the web – pre-HTML and CSS (cascading style sheet) standards – browsers varied considerably over what features they implemented and how.  Over time standards...
  • Blog Post: P is for… Partial Method

    By now, most of you are likely familiar with the concept of partial classes , introduced in .NET 2.0 to both C# and Visual Basic .  Simply put, classes can be marked with the partial keyword indicating that their implementation is split over multiple physical source code files.  This technique...
  • Blog Post: O is for… Oomph

    Oomph?!  no, I’m not making it up.  Oomph is a toolkit for developers facilitating the incorporation of microformats into web applications.  Ok, so what are microformats, you ask?  Here’s a definition from the go-to site on the subject, microformats.org : Designed for humans first...
  • Blog Post: N is for… Nullable<T>

    Nullable<T> is a generic structure introduced with the .NET Framework 2.0 to support the concept of an undefined value.  The T in Nullable<T> is a value type; reference types, like strings, support nullability by design.  For instance, in C#: String s = null ; // works fine! Int32...
  • Blog Post: M is for… M

    M is for M:   How cool is that? You really can’t start talking about M without first mentioning Oslo , the code-name for Microsoft’s model-driven development infrastructure.  Oslo was formally introduced at Microsoft PDC back in October 2008, and its overarching goal is to reduce the disconnect...
  • Blog Post: L is for… Lambda

    If the lambda operator and associated lambda expressions are Greek to you, read on!  lambda (λ) here refers to λ-calculus , which is a formal mathematical system introduced in the 1930s.  It’s evolved to become the basis of the functional programming paradigm embodied by F# and languages such...
  • Blog Post: K is for… Key

    ‘Key’ is a rather overloaded term in .NET and programming circles in general. There are database primary and foreign keys, hash keys, keys to styles and templates in WPF, registry keys, key codes for each key on the keyboard, and many others.  For this post, I’m going to touch on the concept of...
  • Blog Post: J is for.. JSON

    No, not the Greek hero who scored the Golden Fleece; this JSON (note – there’s no ‘a’ here) stands for JavaScript Object Notation.   JSON is quite simply a serialization format for data that leverages JavaScript as the encoding mechanism.  With JSON you can encode data structures and arrays...
  • Blog Post: I is for… Isolated Storage

    Isolated storage is a pretty nifty concept that’s actually been part of the .NET Framework since version 1.1 but is getting a bit more attention these days with the adoption of Silverlight and the desire to leverage the client machine for a better user experience. Since Silverlight is a browser-based...
  • Blog Post: H is for… HierarchyID

    hierarchyid is a new system data type in SQL Server 2008 used to represent a position within a hierarchy.  The value of an hierarchyid column is an encoded representation of the path from the root to the given node (row) – kind of like a directory/file path, only using numbers instead of names....
  • Blog Post: G is for… Generation

    Generation refers to a classification of managed memory that the Common Language Runtime (CLR) garbage collector uses to improve its performance.  The CLR garbage collector is an implementation of a tracing garbage collector or more specifically, a generational or ephemeral garbage collector . A...
  • Blog Post: F is for… F#

    F# is the new kid on the block in terms of .NET languages.  Currently in CTP form , it will be one of the .NET languages proper with the release of Visual Studio 2010 and the .NET Framework 4.0. What makes F# different is its focus on being a functional language: F# is all about writing a program...
  • Blog Post: E is for… Extension Method

    Extension methods were added to C# 3.0 and Visual Basic 9.0, coinciding with the release of Visual Studio 2008 and the .NET Framework 3.5.  An extension method allows you to add to the definition of a compiled type, including classes, structures, and interfaces, without explicitly modifying the...
  • Blog Post: D is for... Dependency Property

    Dependency properties came on the scene with .NET 3.0 to support a variety of functionality in Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF), but the construct makes an appearance in Windows Workflow Foundation (WF) as well. At first blush, it may seem to complicate your orderly world of simple CLR properties...
  • Blog Post: C is for... Color

    Dealing with color in .NET isn't always black-and-white, given the existence of distinct Color structures present in two different .NET namespaces. Windows Forms applications make use of the Color structure in the System.Drawing namespace, while Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) applications use...
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