So every other blog you read today probably has information in it about the Visual Studio 2005 Team System software that was announced today @ Tech-Ed.  I think Chris Sells has the best round-up of must read links about Team System so far so I won't try and outlink him.  I can try and out scoop him though.  You probably have not noticed the welcome messages in each of the Team System Newsgroups posted by their respective Product Unit Managers. 

Rick Laplant Posted to the General Discussion Group. Here is a snippet that explains his background and what drew him to lead his team.  

“My name is Rick LaPlante and I'm the General Manager of Visual Studio Team
System.  I've been with Microsoft 16 years (that's 112 in dog & MS employee
years).  All of that time has been spent in the developer division, or many
precursors to what we currently call the developer division.  I spent many
years as part of the Visual C++ team and ended up running the program
management team and driving the product definition.  I was the development
manager for MS' own internal tools team (where we built the initial versions
of many of the same technologies we're shipping with VSTS today).  I am
passionate about how people build software to make businesses more
productive, and the world a better, more interesting place.  From my first
days on the Microsoft C 5.1 product until now, I'm always amazed at the
value that people create using our software tools.  But in all that time, I've
never had the opportunity to build a "version 1" product and business from
idea to delivery.  This is what we've done with the Visual Studio Team
System.  We stepped back and looked at the market for lifecycle tools, did a
ton of customer research, and realized that what was missing was a suite of
integrated tools the were very approachable, and extremely customizable.”

Julia Liuson Posted the Architect Group:

“Welcome to the Visual Studio Team System Architect discussion group!  Today,
we are very excited to announce the Visual Studio Team System family of
lifecycle tools.  We look forward building a vibrant community around our
tools platform, and involve customers and partners alike to help us make you
successful in building high quality software solutions.“

Keith Rowe Posted to the Project Manager Group:

“I'm Keith Rowe, Product Unit Manager for the Visual Studio Team System tools
for project managers.  I started with Microsoft in 1990 leading the team
that built our first C++ compiler.  Since then, I've wandered around the
company doing start-up projects on a number of teams:  Interactive
Television, MSN, MSNBC, and PC Games.  While the list is a little eclectic,
they all taught me different things about building and shipping great
products and services.  I've had lots of different titles, but it always
comes back to project management.  I returned to Developer Division last
year to join the VSTS team to pour all that project management experience
into this exciting new suite of tools.

Visual Studio 2005 Team System delivers many different project management
tools.  We collect all the work items on your project - requirements,
features, tasks, bugs, issues, risks - in a single server-side database that
the whole team can share.  You can view, edit, track and analyze those work
items from a number of different tools that you already know: Visual Studio,
Microsoft Excel, Microsoft Project, and Windows SharePoint Services.  Each
team member can use the tool they are most comfortable with and everyone
else sees the updates in their tools.  This enables better planning,
scheduling, collaboration, communication, reporting, and process control.“

Brian Harry Posted in the Team Foundations Group (Think new source control!):

“I'm Brian Harry, Product Unit Manager for Visual Studio Team Foundation.  I've
been with Microsoft 10 years and worked on a variety of technologies.  I
came to Microsoft in Nov '94 when One Tree Software (makers of SourceSafe)
was acquired.  After continuing on SourceSafe for a year or so, I had brief
stint on the Microsoft repository and was then one of the founding members
of what eventually became the Common Language Runtime.  I'm probably best
known (notoriously ?) for a widely distributed and controversial treatise on
deterministic finalization a few years ago.  After working on the .NET
Framework through V1.1 I moved back into the developer tools space and am
excited about helping make development teams more effective through the
Visual Studio Team System.”

These teams are just starting to get on board participating in the public developer communities and I encourage you all to ask them questions and give them whatever feedback you might have. Enjoy!