I hadn't seen this one referenced anywhere else...so here it is, with no additional comments from me ;)

And then it seems like Jay Greene expanded on this original reporting for an article in the magazine, now available via Yahoo!.  I wish he'd talked to some ISVs to get their opinions, rather than just Mike Ferris from RedHat.  It is funny, though, that Mr. Ferris talks about "how non-innovative this is going to be."

By "this", do you think he meant Avalon and Indigo?  I'm interested in seeing any project that RedHat is leading that's as innovative as either of these.  I had a hard time finding any new innovation from RedHat on the Fedora page, maybe I was looking in the wrong place.  Has RedHat done anything for developers (or users) as interesting as, say, Firefox?

Maybe by "this" he meant the 2006 Windows release?  Below are a few quotes I found about some of the features planned for that release, again I'd be interested in seeing where RedHat is being more innovative.  And we haven't even really started talking about end-user features of Longhorn, we've been focused on the developer platform up til now, so you can expect to hear more about interesting new end-user and managmenet capabilities as we get closer to launch.

 

http://www.entmag.com/news/article.asp?EditorialsID=5509

As part of Longhorn, Allchin said customers can expect to see new features for intelligent auto configuration, such as BIOSes and firmware that can be “automatically updated in a seamless way.” Also, Allchin said Longhorn will include new functionality for server resiliency, such as self-healing characteristics, a more componentized architecture, and additional monitoring services with filters that can “dynamically” flow out to servers

 

http://zdnet.com.com/2100-1104-5327335.html

Some of the features he mentioned were "great roaming support," .Net Framework 2.0, "new browsing capabilities," the "fresh" user interface, improved migrations and deployments, "more resilience to malware" and "a new photo experience."