J.D. Meier's Blog

Software Engineering, Project Management, and Effectiveness

May, 2011

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Performance Review Template

    • 0 Comments

    It’s that time of year when folks are busy with reviews.  Here is a time-tested template for writing your results in a way that’s easy to defend, while making both your results and your approach shine through:

    This is no ordinary template, and don’t let the simplicity fool you.  It’s evolved over time under the collective scrutiny of many reviewers and people that have used this template to better articulate their impact in a more objective and holistic way.  Here’s why.  It explicitly frames out the following:

    • Results
    • How
    • Evidence
    • Analysis

    “Results” creates space to write about your bottom line results.  This answers the question, “What did you deliver?”, but more importantly, frames it in the context of outcomes and impact.  It’s less about whether you did X, Y, or Z, and more about the actual impact you delivered.  Your results.

    “How” creates space to write about how you achieved your results.  This is especially important if you are trying to highlight and show how your approach demonstrates skills or competencies at a higher level.   This is where you can highlight things like teamwork, cross-group collaboration, leadership skills, etc.

    “Evidence” creates space to share all the quotes, quantities, and qualitative feedback about your impact.  This is the place where you can truly make it obvious that your results and impact are more than just your subjective view.  Nothing speaks stronger than a few powerful quotes from a few of the right people.

    “Analysis” creates space for you to write about the highs and lows.  A simple way to target and frame this is to think in terms of three things going well, and three things to improve.

    Check out the Performance Review Template and I’ll be interested to know what tips or tricks you have for articulating your impact and making your review do justice to the work you’ve done throughout the year.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Portfolios, Programs, and Projects

    • 0 Comments

    Execution excellence as a one-man band is one thing.  Execution excellence for a team or group is another.

    One of the best ways to improve execution excellence for a team or group is to map out the portfolio, programs, and projects.

    image

    Having clarity on the portfolio, programs, and projects is a starting point for mastering execution.

    In patterns & practices, what we did is create a visual roadmap to share the big ticket items.  This helped set expectations with stakeholders in terms of what would ship when.  It also helped build awareness for our internal teams to improve coordination and alignment.

    The Portfolio
    We managed our portfolio in a very simple way.  We simply kept a backlog of projects and initiatives grouped by themes and programs.  At this level, we would do two key things:

    1. Prioritize the projects against demand and commitments.  This would inform our roadmap.
    2. Estimate the size of the project with T-Shirt sizing and do ballpark estimates of people, time, and budget.

    In general, we could manage budgets and resources at the program level, as program level investments.   This helped simplify planning.

    The Programs
    We used programs as organizing themes to group related projects, streamline planning, and simplify communication.  For example, in patterns & practices, we organized our projects into the following programs:

    • Client – We used this program to organize and plan our rich desktop and Web application projects.
    • Engineering Practices – We used this program to organize and plan any security, performance, team development, and application architecture projects.
    • Enterprise Library– We used this program to organize and plan our full Enterprise Library releases, as well as any sustained engineering, and any “Application Blocks.”
    • Mobile – We used this program to organize our projects related to mobile phone scenarios.
    • Web Services – We used this program to organize and plan any of our SOA and Web Services projects.

    By having a backlog of programs and projects, we could establish our “cut line.”  The “cut line” was the line where we’d need more resources and budget in order to execute.  This made it easier to both share what we were working on, as well as push back on demands that exceeded our capacity.  It also facilitated discussions with stakeholders in terms of priorities.  The impact of prioritizing one project over another made it very easy to see the impact in terms of the Roadmap or what would be pushed below the cut line.

    At the program level, we could use high-level user stories and scenarios to get a sense of the size and scope of key projects.  We kept the scenarios high-level so that it was easy to tell the story and paint a quick picture of why the particular project, program, or initiative was important, in a way that stakeholders could relate to.

    The Projects
    At the project level, we got way more specific.  At the project level, we had to get clarity on the demand and the scope.  To do so, we would map out the user stories.  The user stories were collected and prioritized with customers and stakeholders.   The user stories were important because they created a very specific way to scope the project.  They also helped see what skills and experience were crucial to project success.  They also created a way to cut scope at a more atomic level.  They also created a way to flow incremental value throughout the project life cycle.

    As you can imagine, when you have clarity on your portfolio, both in terms of a backlog of programs and projects, as well as expressed as roadmap, and you have clarity on your programs in terms of big bucket investments and themes of work, and you have clarity on your projects, in terms of priorities as well as the actual user demand and how the projects relate to one another, you are moving up the stack in terms of execution excellence, organizational maturity, and most of all, simplicity.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Leadership Checklist

    • 0 Comments

    I created a Leadership Checklist to distill and share practices for effective leadership.

    I created this checklist a little bit differently to try something out.  I used a “user story” approach and I wrote each checklist item as a mini-story you can use for self-reflection.  In a way, they can act as unit tests for leadership.  Here are some examples:

    • As a leader, I surround myself with people that balance my weaknesses and amplify my strengths.
    • As a leader, I focus on leading myself first before I take on leading others (self-leadership, team leadership, organizational leadership, etc.)
    • As a leader, I ask solution-focused questions, such as “How might we solve that?”

    It’s a work in progress, but so far the feedback has been positive.  Feel free to share your favorite leadership practice as a one-liner reminder in the comments on the leadership checklist page.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Visualizing Roadmaps for Execution Excellence

    • 0 Comments

    One of the first things I do to get a handle on execution is to map out the work in flight in the form of a roadmap.

    When there are multiple teams shipping stuff, one of the best ways to improve coordination, collaboration, and planning is to make a simple roadmap.

    image

    Just even putting the roadmap together is an exercise in clarity.

    The simple roadmap of key events is a great way to set expectations and communicate what’s going on.  When there is a lot going on, it’s easy to get overwhelmed and lose track of the various trains leaving the station.  A simple one-page view helps you stay on top of the trains and anticipate where focus and energy will be.

    When you have multiple workstreams and dependencies, such as with vTeams and initiatives, it’s also helpful to put together a simple roadmap of the workstreams to illustrate the interactions.

    image

    One of the key points of creating effective visualizations of roadmaps is to keep them simple.   You can always drill into details with detailed schedules or detailed Gant charts.  The point of the visualization in this case is to have a very simple, “at a glance” of the work in flight across multiple teams.

    You know you’ve done a good job when you can “glance and go” vs. “stop and stare.”

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    How To Set Goals and Achieve Them

    • 0 Comments

    "I love deadlines.  I like the whooshing sound they make as they fly by."  -- Douglas Adams

    I wrote a step-by-step How To on How To – Set Goals and Achieve Them on Getting Results.com.

    I find setting goals and achieving them is a blend of art and science.  The art part is knowing how to frame the goal in a way that inspires you to action on a regular basis.  The science part is breaking the goal down into actionable steps that you can measure against targets.

    Over the years, the three most important things I learned about goals are:

    1. Factor the inspiration from the perspiration.
    2. The "Why" behind the goal is everything.
    3. You can achieve big goals by taking little steps over time.

    Factor the Inspiration from the Perspiration
    Dream big.  Don’t hack up your dream into little insignificant parts right off the bat.  Inspire yourself with skill.  Find your buttons and push them until that little part of you that wants more from life wakes up and says, I want me some of that.

    Goals are among the best way to change your life or change the world or simply move forward versus slide back.   Create inspirational goals, the kind that light your fire.  That’s your starting point.  That gets you ready for the tough part.

    The perspiration of the goal, or the tough part, is translating the end-in-mind into action.   This is the part where you break the goal down into sub-goals, steps, and actions.  This is the part where you make the goal SMART – specific, measurable, actionable, relevant, and timely.  This is the part where you get clarity on what success looks like along the way, and how you will map out your path to get to your destination.

    The simple lesson here is, dream up compelling goals first and get excited before you start applying the rigor and discipline of making them happen.  Then use the rigor and discipline of making them happen to inspire you along the way, as you make progress toward your goal.

    The Why Behind the Goal is Everything
    There are many ways to kill a dream or kill a goal.  The longer it’s spread out over time and space, the more hurdles and challenges you might have to deal with along the way.  But some goals are dead right out of the gate.

    If your goal lacks life and has no compelling “Why” to drive it, it’s dead in the water.  It doesn’t stand a fighting chance.  If you want your goal to stand the test of time and to help you stay the course, then you need to have a compelling “Why” behind it.  The “Why” is the generator of your juice that makes you go.  You know it’s working when you simply remember “Why” and you are back on track.

    You Can Achieve Big Goals by Taking Little Steps Over Time
    The surprise is that consistent action really does pay off.  It’s a case of slow and steady wins the race.  The trick here is not to go intentionally slow and not to depend on baby steps.  Instead, it’s to find the way forward, and to keep taking action.  Sometimes that means taking little steps.  Those little steps add up over time.

    I integrated these lessons into my How To – Set Goals and Achieve Them to stack the deck in your favor and to help set you up for success in achieving your goals.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Underutilized

    • 0 Comments

    When it comes to people, underutilized does not mean squeeze out more hours, it means unleash more strengths.

    When people have the chance to give their best where they have their best to give, this has an automatic way of taking care of utilization, motivation, impact, etc.  When somebody is in their element, effective managers co-create the goals and get out of the way.  It’s among the best ways to get the best results from teams or individuals.  If you want to optimize a team, then unleash the strengths of each individual.

    The power of people in a knowledge worker world is that you get exponential results when people are playing to their strengths.   The simplest way to do this is have people in roles where they spend more time in their strengths and less time in their weaknesses.  Another way to unleash their strength is pair them up with people that compliment their strengths or balance out their weaknesses.

    On the flip side, the simplest way to create low-performing teams is to have people spend more time in their weaknesses and very little time in their strengths.   While this is simple and obvious, the real trick is looking for it and finding ways to bring out people’s best.

    While it’s not always easy, and you often have to get creative, one of the best things you can do for you, your company, the world, is to spend more time in your strengths and help others do the same.  It’s the fittest and the flexible that survive, and it’s your unique strengths that crank up your fit factor.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    Time Management Checklist

    • 2 Comments

    I created a Time Management Checklist on Getting Results.com.

    I’ created time management checklists before, but this is probably the most comprehensive.  It was also the most difficult one.  I wanted to keep it scannable, while sharing the best wisdom, insights, and lessons learned around time management.  Most importantly, I wanted to make it actionable.

    To make it more actionable, I chunked the checklist into the following categories:

    • Core
    • Action
    • Calendar / Schedule
    • Email / Social Media
    • Energy
    • Focus
    • Goals
    • Meetings
    • Motivation
    • Organizing
    • Planning
    • Prioritizing
    • Task Management
    • Timeboxing / Time Budgeting

    Here is the checklist so far:

    If you see key strategies missing, sent me a note.  I want to have a one-stop shop of time management strategies at a glance. 

    On an interesting note, my book, Getting Results the Agile Way was #2 in Germany for Time Management for a while according to Amazon.  I hadn’t really thought of it as a time management book – I thought of it more as a personal empowerment system, but now that I think about it, time management makes perfect sense.  At the end of the day, mastering your time is the key to effectiveness.  (Note that you can read Getting Results the Agile Way for free online.  I want everybody to have the best patterns and practices for making the most of what they’ve got.)

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    How To Use Getting Results the Agile Way with Evernote

    • 0 Comments

    One of the most common questions I get with Getting Results the Agile Way is, “What tools do I use to implement it?”

    The answer is, it depends on how "lightweight" or "heavy" I need to be for a given scenario.  The thing to keep in mind is that the system is stretch to fit because it's based on a simple set of principles, patterns, and practices.  See Values, Principles, and Practices of Getting Results the Agile Way.

    That said, I have a few key scenarios:

    1. Just me.
    2. Pen and Paper.
    3. Evernote.

    The Just Me Scenario
    In the "Just Me" scenario, I don't use any tools.  I just take "mental notes."  I use The Rule of Three to identify three outcomes for the day.  I simply ask the question, "What are the three most important results for today?"  Because it's three things, it's easy to remember, and it helps me stay on track.  Because it's results or outcomes, not activities, I don't get lost in the minutia.

    The Pen and Paper Scenario
    In the Pen and Paper scenario, I carry a little yellow sticky pad.  I like yellow stickies because they are portable and help me free up my mind by writing things down.  The act of writing it down, also forces me to get a bit more clarity.  As a practice, I either write the three results I want for the day on the first note, or I write one outcome per note.  The main reason I write one result per sticky note is so that I can either jot supporting notes, such as tasks, or so I can throw it away when I've achieve that particular result.  It's a simple way to game my day and build a sense of progress.

    I do find that writing things down, even as a simple reference, helps me stay on track way more than just having it in my head.

    The Evernote Scenario
    The Evernote scenario is my high-end scenario.  This is for when I'm dealing with multiple projects, leading teams, etc.  It's still incredibly light-weight, but it helps me stay on top of my game, while juggling many things.  It also helps me quickly see when I have too much open work, or when I'm splitting my time and energy across too many things.  It also helps me see patterns by flipping back through my daily outcomes, weekly outcomes, etc.

    It's hard to believe, but already I've been using Evernote with Getting Results the Agile Way for years.  I just checked the dates of my daily outcomes, and I had switched to Evernote back in 2009.  Time sure flies.  It really does.

    Anyway, I put together a simple step-by-step How To to walk you through setting up Getting Results the Agile Way in Evernote.  Here it is:

    OneNote
    If you’re a OneNote user, and you want to see how to use Getting Results the Agile Way with OneNote, check out Anu’s post on using Getting Results the Agile Way with OneNote.

  • J.D. Meier's Blog

    User Stories for Cloud Enterprise Strategy

    • 0 Comments

    This is a collection of user stories for the cloud.  This collection is a simple way to share the most common scenarios that Enterprise Architects, business leaders, and IT leaders will be facing as they adopt cloud technologies.

    I decided to kill two birds with one stone.  First, I wanted to share a simple example of how to share user stories.  User stories are a powerful way to identify and enumerate the problems, wants, and needs within a given domain.  Having a bird’s-eye view helps you see the forest from the trees so that you can better prioritize as well as see trends and patterns.  Second, I wanted to share a real example that’s relevant and easy to relate to.  In this case, I’m sharing cloud user stories.  I can’t think of a more relevant body of knowledge for this significant inflection point in our industry.

    There are two key outcomes from this post: 1) You can effectively share user stories for a problem space, and 2) You have a good understanding of some of the key challenges facing Enterprise Architects, business leaders, and IT leaders in terms of cloud technologies.

    An example is worth a 1000 words, but one of the things I want you to notice in the user stories below, is the wording.  The secret to wording effective user stories is to use persona-based scenarios with goals.  For example, “As an Enterprise Architect, I want to …” or “As an IT Leader, I need to ….”  Yes, this looks simple, but this phrasing is powerful.  It makes it easy to collect user stories in a fast way.  The mistake is to have a bunch of user stories that are over-generalized and over-loaded.  With user stories, the key is to be clear, simple, and straightforward.  Clever is the enemy.  It should be easy for anybody to read the user stories and easily make sense of them without having to do a bunch of mental gymnastics or parsing.   The simpler the better.

    If you see key stories that I’m missing, feel free to share in the comments.  The beauty of having a map of user stories is that it’s easy to add or reshape the map.   This is the key to being able to leverage multiple smart people in an organized way.

    Categories

    • Awareness / Education
    • Architecture
    • Availability
    • Competition
    • Cost
    • Governance and Regulation
    • Industry
    • Integration
    • Operations
    • People
    • Performance
    • Planning
    • Risk
    • Security
    • Service Levels / Quality of Service
    • Solutions
    • Sourcing
    • Strategy
    • Support

    Cloud Enterprise Strategy Scenarios Map

    Category

    Items

    Awareness / Education

    • As a Business Leader, I want Microsoft to define their perspective on Cloud Computing and provide a holistic view of how their products, technologies and services help me
    • As an Enterprise Architect I want to know how the cloud architecture supports my business goals and enterprise architecture
    • As an IT Leader I want details on training and educating my staff in the use and support for the service

    View More…

    • As a Business Leader, I want to understand why I wouldn't go to a proven partner that has a history of doing this for my competition, one that is already providing a similar service as part of our outsourcing agreement
    • As an Enterprise Architect I want to understand how the cloud architecture reduces complexity
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want a way to see what my peers are doing, to learn and support each other
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want actionable guidance for prioritization of ground apps to cloud apps. How do I work out the balance for what should go into the cloud?
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want education on the content myself so that I am well versed in the specific items that apply to my customer
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to know the good, bad, and ugly so that I am not misrepresenting this to the customer based on marketing material
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to understand why I would even consider moving to the cloud. What we have works, why change?
    • As an Enterprise Strategy Architect, I want to understand the perceptions of customers and assumptions they will have that lead to preconceived ideas – and how do I ‘unlearn’ them to get to a better discussion
    • As an Enterprise Strategy Architect, I want to understand the right sequence of steps to educate a customer on cloud
    • As an IT Leader, I want to know where the complexity is in the cloud. Every new paradigm claims to be simpler but still has to deal with the same operational baggage – where is the complexity in cloud solutions?
    • As an IT Leader, I want to know why I wouldn't just go to a traditional outsourcer
    • As an IT Leader, I want to understand how I manage corporate data that may span multiple cloud scenarios
    • As an IT Leader, I want to understand why I would introduce yet another environment into my services and the associated complexity

    Architecture

    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to see reference architecture for compelling cloud scenarios that will help me build a desired end-state for my specific customer scenario
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to see case studies of both success and failure
    • As an Enterprise Strategy Architect, I want to learn about proven Reference Architecture patterns for the cloud.

    View More…

    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to understand Microsoft’s reference models for cloud concepts and terms.
    • As an Enterprise Strategy Architect, I want data movement and management patterns and best practices
    • As an Enterprise Strategy Architect, I want to identify Cloud System Integration Patterns (Cloud-To-Ground, VendorCloud-To-Ground, OurCloud-ToVendorCloud, VendorCloud-to-VendorCloud-to-Ground, etc)

    Availability

    • As a Business Leader, I want to understand geographical redundancy
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to know how to handle disaster recovery in the cloud
    • As an IT Leader, I want to understand the same details I would expect from my own data center (fault tolerance, back up procedures, disaster recovery etc.)

    View More…

    • As a Business Leader, I want to know what happens when the next country decides to block Internet access
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to learn how to evaluate cloud services for availability across all regions I need to cover. (What is the performance? What about support in a global environment?)

    Competition

    • As a Business Leader, I want to know how Microsoft’s cloud offerings compare to the competition, and especially Amazon Web Services
    • As a Business Leader, I want to understand how cloud offerings can give me a leg up on my competition
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want a way to know what competitors are saying and how it should be addressed

    Cost

    • As a Business Leader, I want to understand the cost structure for cloud solutions
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want a way to create a realistic cost model based on the current workload
    • As an IT Leader, I want to know if I need to migrate or rewrite my apps and what are the costs associated with this

    View More…

    • As a Business Leader, how do I manage the transition period in which I probably have to pay twice?
    • As a Business Leader, I want a consistent cost of service so that I can manage against my budget
    • As a Business Leader, I want to know how to manage cloud service subscriptions across a large enterprise to optimize subscription costs
    • As a Business Leader, I want to know that I am not going to incur a large spike in my costs as part of the migration to the cloud
    • As a Business Leader, I want to know what geographic redundancy does to my bandwidth usage and costs
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want a way to assist with the customer presentations and planning discussions
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want a way to identify areas in IT where cost reductions can be had with relatively low risk
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want the costs to be known and predictable so that I can budget accordingly
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to learn how to manage cloud service subscriptions across a large enterprise to optimize subscription costs
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to understand how to build the cost model for the customer
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want understand the taxation impact on Cloud based Transactions (state, Federal, inter-nation)
    • As an IT Leader, I want a clear cost breakdown contrasted against my current costs or if I used my existing environment
    • As an IT Leader, I want to understand how I can implement chargeback within my IT environment to provide more transparency on costs
    • As an IT Leader, I want to understand the cost structure for the cloud solutions

    Governance and Regulation

    • As a Business Leader, I want to know how to manage government regulations related to where certain info can be stored. (For large enterprise that have subsidiaries in several countries. A single cloud service may not be able to comply with each countries various regulation needs)
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want a way to address all regulations and restrictions that may be realized for my customers in all areas they do business
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to ensure I am meeting regulatory requirements

    View More…

    • As a Business Leader, I want to know how to adhere to the various government regulations related to pricing and information storage
    • As a Business Leader, I want to understand the environmental impact of moving to the cloud. How will this impact my green initiatives?
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to learn how to adhere to the various government regulations related to pricing and information storage.
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to learn how to manage government regulations related to where certain information can be stored.
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to understand the jurisdiction issues with the cloud and how to mitigate them for my region(s)

    Industry

    • As an Enterprise Strategy Architect, I want to identify the relevant cloud industry trends for the business.

    Integration

    • As a Business Leader, I want to understand how I integrate with my existing systems
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to understand how to integrate cloud solutions with my existing processes
    • As an IT Leader, do I need to move all my integrated apps to the cloud or can I do this progressively? What does this mean when apps are integrated (data, web services…)?

    Operations

    • As an IT Leader, I want to know how many environments do I need and what are the implications and costs (dev/test/pre-prod/prod)
    • As an IT Leader, I want to know how to integrate cloud reporting into my existing reporting infrastructure
    • As an IT Leader, I want to understand release management requirements to ensure they fit with our current procedures or do not create undue overhead

    View More…

    • As an IT Leader, I want to know what the reporting capabilities of the service are. This provides visibility to the business on how the services are performing.
    • As an IT Leader, I want to understand a holistic view on management that spans all cloud scenarios
    • As an IT leader, I want to understand how I model the health of applications that may span private and public clouds or fully deployed in public cloud to ensure I can have better control on service levels.
    • As an IT Leader, I want to understand how I model the health of applications that may span private and public clouds or fully deployed in public cloud to ensure I can have better control on service levels
    • As an IT Leader, what is the flexibility of an organization to decide of when upgrades are appropriate based on their priorities and rhythms and how can I test my environment before upgrading the production environment?

    People

    • As a Business Leader, I want to understand how my workforce must evolve to embrace the cloud
    • As a Business Leader, I want to understand how the cloud impacts my user base globally
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to know what this means to IT teams (Do I need to get rid of people or repurpose the teams -- which means here up leveling, training)

    View More…

    • As a Business Leader, I want to understand how various cloud scenarios impact my workforce levels
    • As an Enterprise Strategy Architect, I want guidance for measuring the impact of moving a system to the cloud (business and IT)

    Performance

    • As a Business Leader, I want to understand how my service level management processes need to cater to online service redelivery
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to know what are the availability, reliability, and scalability of the cloud (What do the SLAs mean? Do they still hold the same commitments?)
    • As an IT Leader, I want to know that I can make quick patches to address immediate quality of service issues

    View More…

    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want the cloud to provide elasticity for my business as it expands and contracts to address seasonal load
    • As an IT Leader, I want to know how to more effectively manage capacity requirements to avoid underutilized infrastructure and leverage online service more effectively
    • As an IT Leader, I want to understand the level of service I can expect for all of my user base

    Planning

    • As a Business Leader, I want to understand how I test the solution before deployment
    • As a Customer, I want to know how to work out the balance for what should go into the cloud – I accept it’s not 0% and not 100% - but how do I find the right balance?
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to develop some guiding architectural principles to help me build strategy and roadmap around Cloud Computing

    View More…

    • As a Business Leader, I want to determine the effort needed to migrate our existing solution. Is this a lift and shift? Is this a rewrite, do we extend?
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want a way to determine the items in the cloud offerings that are relevant to my customer
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want my application portfolio management to inject cloud relevant criteria to decide what moves to the cloud and when (if it all)
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to ensure we are not impacting the ability to realize change
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to know how I can reduce my IT infrastructure burden by bursting capabilities into the cloud when I can’t outsource the whole service to the cloud
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to know what maturity levels for what capabilities I need to ensure to better enable leveraging cloud scenarios
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to understand how I can treat my physical infrastructure assets as more of a fabric and abstract the complexities of OEM devices

    Risk

    • As a Business Leader, I want to know how I can retrieve my IP/Data should I decide to move provider (service lock-in)
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to understand the areas of risk that I am accepting by trusting an external data center and service
    • As an IT Leader, I want to know the blockers that lead to implementation failure

    View More…

    • As a Business Leader, how comfortable is a European company to host in a datacenter that is in the US?
    • As a Business Leader, I want to know what happens if the service is not reliable. What are my options? Can I easily find another solution and get out of the contract?
    • As a Business Leader, I want to understand the risks of depending on a single partner to run my business
    • As a Business Leader, I want to understand what is involved if we decide to return to our existing service
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to be able to test with low risk opportunities if we decide to proceed
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to know how to avoid vendor lock in
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to understand how to identify low risk opportunities for the cloud
    • As an IT Leader, I want to know the blockers for adoption that cause decision paralysis
    • As an IT Leader, I want to know where the complexity is in cloud based solutions

    Security

    • As an Enterprise Architect I want to understand what new security risks exist in the cloud and what old risks have been mitigated
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to know how I manage identity across cloud scenarios considering I’ve already invested heavily in my internal IT
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to know how to manage privacy and integrity of the data if it’s hosted in the cloud. (How do I restrict access to the data by the hoster, and what do I do about a local copy of the data that is synchronized regularly?)

    View More…

    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to know how to manage accessing cloud services from within the various heterogeneous internal networks
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to understand a holistic view on security that spans all cloud scenarios
    • As an Enterprise Architect, my company has invested in a common directory (AD/SSO). How does this work in the cloud?

    Service Levels / Quality of Service

    • As a Business Leader I want to understand who is liable in the event of a service failure
    • As a Business Leader I want to understand who is liable in the event of a security breach
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to understand what level of technical support is available to myself and my team

    View More…

    • As an Business Leader, I want to know if I’ll have to change my SLA with customers
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to know how the cloud infrastructure is supported

    Solutions

    • As a Business Leader, I want to try before I buy and have access to a proof of concept
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want access to experts that can do analysis on creating solutions to determine the issues, risks, and costs for migration
    • As an IT Leader, I want to understand the balance for what should go in the cloud; I accept it’s not 0% and not 100%, how do I find the right balance

    View More…

    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want a way to assist with the proof of concept
    • As an Enterprise Strategy Architect, I want to know how I can backup our Ground based HPC with the Cloud for on demand scale
    • As an IT Leader, I want my IT strategy to reflect Cloud computing, on-premises and off-premises capabilities

    Sourcing

    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to know how to do partnership management in the cloud. (Managing a partner is hard and when this comes down to the fact that the service can be unavailable it is even more important to do a good job)
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to know how to evaluate whether the application or system is considered core to my business and could be sourced to a partner in the cloud (Can the system or application be hosted outside of the intranet?)
    • As an Enterprise Strategy Architect, I want to know how to use the Cloud for our DR plan. (i.e. fail from Ground to Cloud)

    Strategy

    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to understand Microsoft’s strategy for cloud

    Support

    • As a business leader, I want to know how we integrate with our existing help desk for escalation
    • As a Business Leader, I want to know if there is a reliable support structure (24x7)
    • As an IT Leader, I want to know what happens if something goes wrong; how fast will I be notified of an issue, how long will it take to be addressed, what priority will I be given contrasted against the other consumers of the service?

    View More…

    • As a Business Leader, I want to know what the support implications are in a global environment
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to know how to evaluate or enforce a 24x7 support model with the cloud
    • As an Enterprise Architect, I want to know who I call if I am experiencing an issue with the hosted solution
Page 1 of 1 (9 items)