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Software Engineering, Project Management, and Effectiveness

The Charge: Activating the 10 Human Drives that Make You Feel Alive

The Charge: Activating the 10 Human Drives that Make You Feel Alive

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I wrote another book review: The Charge: Activating the 10 Human Drives that Make You Feel Alive

I've been reading a lot of books lately, looking for ones that I can use at Microsoft.  Microsoft is a challenging environment that pits your skills against some tough challenges.   When you're working in an arena that supports the world, the game gets tougher.  As you move up the stack, there is no shortage of traps, pitfalls, and challenges to stretch and grow you in new ways.

The way I stay on top of the game is primarily through three things:

  1. Books
  2. People
  3. Practice

I read a lot of books, anything from project management, to business skills, to personal development, to leadership and strategy.  It's not like you can ever be too good, and the game is always changing.  Learning the right methodology, method, or technique can be the difference between success and failure.  Some of the best tools are new ways of looking at the world.

People can show you things fast.  Like “monkey see, monkey do”, great habits can rub off on you, if you surround yourself with great people.  People really are the short-cuts.  More precisely, mentors are the absolute short-cuts.  They've been there, and done that, so they can save you a lot of pain and help you avoid dead ends.  They can also light the path to a better way of doing things.  People really are the way to achieve better, faster, cheaper results in the real-world.  When you experience masters in action practicing their craft, you know exactly what I mean.

Practice is taking the science and applying it to the real world.  That's the art part.  While practice doesn't make perfect, it does build skill, and skills are the difference that makes the difference.  Motivation and ability are one thing, but skills are the amplifier of what's possible.  The greatest growth I have seen time and again is when somebody expands their capabilities with new skills.  It's how they change their game, play at a new level, and transform what they are capable of.  It's like a martial artist graduating through the belts.

Anyway, back to my point about books.  The beauty of books is that they are a fast way to learn smarter ways for better days.  One of the most insightful books I've read lately, is The Charge, by Brendon Burchard.  It's a book about how to light your soul on fire and bring out your best in work and life.  What I like about the book is that it introduces a new framework for motivation that goes beyond what we need, and puts a new spin on what we want, backed by the latest neuroscience and positive psychology.

I wrote a book review that gives you a guided tour of the book and what you'll learn:

Note – My book review format is evolving.  I’m trying to develop a format and structure that helps you very quickly get a tour of the book, and really understand what problems the book is solving, and what’s really in it for you.  It doesn’t replace book reviews on Amazon, but it should be a nice supplement in that it gives you a quick bird’s-eye view, as well as deep dives into the content of the book.