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Time Management Tips #22 - Close the Flood Gates

Time Management Tips #22 - Close the Flood Gates

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UntitledIf you are really behind, and want to dig yourself out, and get back on top things, then close the flood gate.

Don't take on new things.

Time management tips #22 is close the flood gates.  It's all too easy to reopen the door, let things slip in, and keep taking on new things, without first finishing what's already on your overloaded plate.  Closing the flood gate simply means stop randomizing and churning on new work that you don't have the time, capacity, bandwidth, attention, or energy to focus on.  If you keep taking on more, it's not a service to anybody, especially yourself.

Whenever I find myself buried among a sea of open work, unfinished tasks, and things to do, I close the flood gate.  I stand guard at the door of incoming requests, and I put all of my focus on the open work.

It's easy to stretch past capacity.  You say yes to things you think will finish a little faster than they actually do.  Things come up.  You didn't have a buffer for when things go wrong.  The key is to recognize when you're past your capacity, and to take decisive action.

No new work.  Full focus on the work that is wearing you down, or blocking your ability to flow value. 

The problem is work will still come your way.  Have a place to put it.  A simple list is fine.  You can review it and prioritize it when you're read to take on more things.  The trap to avoid is dabbling in new work, dabbling in unfinished work, and throwing more balls in the air, than you can possibly juggle.

Don't create your own problem by taking on work past your capacity.
If somebody assigns work to you, do them a favor, and let them know you're at capacity, and when you expect to free up.
If you see new work as higher value than what's already on your plate, consider trading up for it, and letting your open work go.
If you have so much open work that you're spending more time managing it, than finishing it, then consider shelving the lower priority work.  Put it on the shelf for another day.  Temporary let it go, while you concentrate your focus on a vital few things to complete them.

You'll be surprised what you're capable of with focus and priorities and concentrated effort in small batches of time.

Close the flood gate, narrow your focus, flow your value.

For work-life balance skills , check out 30 Days of Getting Results, and for a work-life balance system check out Agile Results at Getting Results.com.

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