J.D. Meier's Blog

Software Engineering, Project Management, and Effectiveness

How To Read 10,000 Words a Minute

How To Read 10,000 Words a Minute

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Want to read faster? What if you could read and think at extreme speeds?   I wrote a post that reveals the program that I’ve used to exponentially improve my reading and thinking speeds.  I’m back in the 1,000+ words per minute camp, and working towards 10,000 words per minute:

Even if you could read just a little faster, imagine how much time you get back each day, considering all the email and information you have to process each day.  Imagine how much more time you get back if you can read 1,000 words a minute, or more.  Imagine all the books you could read, how quickly you can clear you email, and how much easier you can stay on top of things.

There are a lot of reasons that hold people back from reading much faster than they ever thought possible.  One of the main reasons is people just don’t’ know what they are capable of.  Another reason is that people say their words in their throat, even when they are reading to themselves, and this is incredibly slow, compared to what our minds are capable of.  Another reason is that we aren’t use to moving or using our eyes even close to what they are capable of.

In the post, I share the program I use and how it trains you to stop subvocalizing, how to scan and process information at extreme speeds, and how to retrain and build your eyes to go much faster than they are used to.

This is one of the ultimate secret weapons in your toolbox for gaining more time, keeping your email inbox clear, and learning at a much faster rate, than people are used to.

Check out How To Read 10,000 Words Per Minute.    Even if you don’t get the program, you can at least see how the mechanics work, and you can better appreciate how you can exponentially improve your own reading speeds and ability to think and process much faster. 

This is truly one of the ultimate personal development tools that pays back every single day (assuming that you have to read and process information each day.)